Get more info on this report!The Post-Recession Consumer in the U.S.May 1, 2010As consumer confidence and economic optimis...
Market Insights: A Selection From The ReportConsumer Confidence a Dynamic PhenomenonOne of the most striking findings of t...
Table of ContentsChapter 1 Executive SummaryBackground     Introduction     Overview of the ReportScope and Methodology   ...
Confident Consumers Have More High-Value Life Insurance PoliciesOverview of Shopping Behavior      Anxious Consumers Shop ...
Confident Consumers Go Out More     Anxious and Confident Consumers Choose Same Family and Fast Food     Restaurants     A...
Shifts in Consumer Demographics during the Great Recession       Consumer Confidence a Dynamic Phenomenon       Many Chang...
Table 3-4: Unemployment Rate and Duration of Unemployment among Men by       Age Group, 2009       Multicultural Consumers...
Table 4-2: Attitudes toward Financial Services, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers      Anxious Consumers More Likely to Hire...
Table 5-4: Shopping in New Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers      Confident Consumers on Quest for Quality      Tabl...
Table 5-19: Catalog Shopping in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident     ConsumersPurchasing Patterns     Women More Like...
Table 6-13: Percent Using Store Brands in Drug Stores, Anxious vs. Confident      ConsumersChapter 7 Shopping for the Home...
Chapter 8 How Confident and Anxious Consumers Spend Leisure TimeOverview      Confident Consumers More Physically Fit     ...
Table 8-18: Movie Attendance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers         Confident Consumers Frequent Users of Fast Food Outl...
Table 9-9: Reasons for Buying Cars, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers       American Cars Get More Respect from Confident Co...
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Post-Recession Consumer in the U.S., The

  1. 1. Get more info on this report!The Post-Recession Consumer in the U.S.May 1, 2010As consumer confidence and economic optimism slowly returned in the first half of2010, marketers and market researchers differed sharply over whether the price-conscious consumer who dominated the marketplace during the Great Recession wouldprove to be a temporary aberration or a permanent fixture in the American economy.This Packaged Facts report sifts through five years of Experian Simmons NationalConsumer Study (NCS) data to follow the twists and turns in consumer confidencebefore, during and in the immediate aftermath of the most severe economic downturn in70 years. The report contrasts the attitudes and behavior of consumers on the highestend of the Consumer Confidence Index of the Experian Simmons NCS (“ConfidentConsumers”) with those on the lowest end (“Anxious Consumers”). By doing so, itsheds light on the conflicted mindset of consumers as the recession loses its grip andsuggests how marketers might respond to their customers in an uncertain post-recession economic environment.The first chapter of the report tracks changes in consumer confidence between 2005and 2009, provides in-depth insights into trends affecting the post-recessionenvironment in key areas such as price sensitivity and use of premium brands andhighlights key opportunities in the post-recession consumer market. The next chapterscontrast the demographics of Anxious and Confident Consumers today, analyze howConfident and Anxious Consumers handle their personal finances and provide anoverview of their shopping and spending patterns. Subsequent chapters offer an in-depth view of how Confident and Anxious Consumers shop in supermarkets anddrugstores and how they behave when shopping for the home. Another chapter offersan extensive analysis of how Confident and Anxious Consumers spend leisure time,including home entertainment, going out, and using the Internet and cellphones. Thefinal chapter focuses on Confident and Anxious Consumers in the fashion andautomotive sectors.Read an excerpt from this report below.Additional Information
  2. 2. Market Insights: A Selection From The ReportConsumer Confidence a Dynamic PhenomenonOne of the most striking findings of this Packaged Facts analysis of Experian SimmonsNCS consumer confidence data is that “consumer confidence” is a highly fluid concept.From 2005 through 2009 there were tens millions of Americans who migrated in and outof the ranks of Confident and Anxious Consumers. At the end of this period, thedemographic profile of Confident and Anxious Consumers had been dramaticallytransformed.Many Changes in Demographic Profile of Anxious and Confident ConsumersThe demographic profile of Confident and Anxious Consumers changed radically duringthe recession.Compared to 2005, the Confident Consumer population base now includes a smallerpercentage of non-Hispanic whites (62% vs. 73%) and consequently a higher proportionof multicultural consumers (38% vs. 27%).The same period also saw a reversal in the political composition of ConfidentConsumers. Whereas in 2005, only 24% were Democrats and 41% were Republicans,by 2009 only 24% were Republicans and 41% were Democrats. The percentage ofpolitical conservatives dropped from 45% to 33%, while those identifying asconservative evangelical Christians declined from 38% to 31% of the ConfidentConsumer segment.Marketers Try to Redefine Meaning of Value in Unpredictable Post-RecessionEnvironmentRetailers and marketers are coming to grips with the need to reposition their brands inthe post-recession era. After surviving a period when they and their customers definedvalue purely in terms of price, marketers are searching for strategies that transcend theidea that the main benefit of buying their brands is to save money. A Macy’s executivehas noted that the retailer is “working to more clearly define Macy’s value to ourcustomers in a way that isn’t focused only on price,” and is concentrating on longer-termstrategic issues such as its localization program. A Kimberly-Clark Corp. executive haspointed out the need to focus on innovation that is truly meaningful to customers. Asnoted in Advertising Age (February 1, 2010), “A big part of the coming-out-of-recessionstrategy lies in keeping the value messaging that worked so well in the downturn, butnow redefining the meaning of value. Whether it be through transitional messaging,product mix or innovation, the bottom line of marketing your way out of the recessionboils down to honing your relationship with the consumer.”
  3. 3. Table of ContentsChapter 1 Executive SummaryBackground Introduction Overview of the ReportScope and Methodology Scope of the Market MethodologyTrends and Opportunities Confident Consumers Begin to Return to the Marketplace The “New Frugality”: A Temporary Fad or a Permanent Condition? Post-Recession Consumers Remain Sensitive to Price Brand Names Continue to Appeal to Confident Consumers Increasing Reliance on Online Shopping Likely to Endure Hyperpartisan Political Environment Affects Confidence Marketers Try to Redefine Meaning of Value in Unpredictable Post-Recession Environment Confident Consumers Offer the Best Way Forward for MarketersPersonal Profile of Anxious and Confident Consumers Nearly 48 Million Consumers Categorized as Confident Younger Consumers Maintain Confidence, Older Consumers More Anxious Men in 45+ Age Group Most Likely to Be Anxious Consumers Multicultural Consumers More Confident Regional and Urban Differences Seen Marital Status Impacts Consumer Confidence Larger Households More Confident Education Creates Confident Consumers Job Switching Part of Confident Consumer Profile Managers and Professionals Dominate Confident Consumers Multiple Earners in Household Make for Confident Consumers Views of Life Mirror Level of Economic Confidence Political Orientation Affects Consumer ViewsManaging Personal Finances Confident Consumers Are Careful with Their Money Anxious Consumers More Worried about Banks Confident Consumers Are Informed Buyers of Financial Services Anxious Consumers More Likely to Use Credit Cards Paying Bills Online Favored by Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Less Averse to Risk Anxious and Confident Consumers Equally Likely to Own Investments Savings Accounts More Popular with Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Have More Debt
  4. 4. Confident Consumers Have More High-Value Life Insurance PoliciesOverview of Shopping Behavior Anxious Consumers Shop Less Often Confident Consumers See Shopping as Experience, Not a Chore New Stores Entice Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Look for Good Deals Brand Awareness Higher among Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Are Influencers Environmentally Friendly Companies Favored by Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Prefer to Buy American Anxious Consumers Don’t Like Advertising Product Placement Works with Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Like Cents-Off Coupons Manufacturers’ Incentive Offers Draw Attention from Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising Confident Consumers Are Big Online Spenders Confident Consumers More Inclined to Buy Automobiles and Consumer ElectronicsShopping in Supermarkets and Drug Stores New Foods Entice Confident Consumers Frozen Dinners Get Nod from Anxious Consumers Anxious Consumers Less Interested in Grocery Shopping Little Difference in Use of Cents-Off Coupons in Supermarkets Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising Anxious Consumers Lean toward Store Brands in Supermarkets Confident Consumers Shop More Often in Drug Stores Store Brands More Popular with Anxious Consumers When in Drug StoresShopping for the Home New Consumer Electronics Products Lure Tech-Savvy Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Likely to Shop in Consumer Electronics Stores Homes of Confident Consumers Filled with Electronics Big TVs Found in Confident Consumer Households Confident Consumers Spend More on Home Furnishings and Bed, Bath & Linens Household Appliance Purchases Similar Confident Consumers More Likely to Plan Home Remodeling Projects Similar Patterns in Shopping in Home Improvement StoresHow Confident and Anxious Consumers Spend Leisure Time Anxious and Confident Consumers Share Many Leisure Activities Anxious Consumers Less Involved with the Internet Confident Consumers Tied to the Internet Primetime Viewing Habits Differ Confident Consumers Turn Away from CDs to Downloads Bookstores Still Important Many Differences in Magazine Choices of Men in Anxious and Confident Consumer Segments Cellphones Vital Part of Lifestyle of Confident Consumers
  5. 5. Confident Consumers Go Out More Anxious and Confident Consumers Choose Same Family and Fast Food Restaurants Anxious Consumers Would Rather Stay in the U.S. Cruises Attract Anxious ConsumersConsumer Profiles: Fashion and Automotive Even Confident Consumers Cautious about Spending on Clothes Walmart and Target Top Choices for Anxious and Confident Consumers Store Brands of Women’s Lingerie More Popular among Anxious Consumers Multiple Vehicles Common in Both Anxious and Confident Consumer Households American Cars Get More Respect from Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Dial Back Expectations Confident Consumers More Likely to Spend $30,000 or More for Cars New Car Purchases Planned by Confident ConsumersChapter 2 Trends and OpportunitiesThe Return of the Confident Consumer Confident Consumers Begin to Return to the Marketplace Figure 2-1: Number of Anxious and Confident Consumers, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Figure 2-2: Anxious and Confident Consumers as Percentages of the Adult Population, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Higher-Income Consumers Start to Regain Confidence Table 2-1: Percent of Individuals with Employment Income and Household Income of $100,000 or More Classified as Anxious and Confident Consumers, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009Trends in Post-Recession Consumer Attitudes The “New Frugality”: A Temporary Fad or a Permanent Condition? Post-Recession Consumers Remain Sensitive to Price Table 2-2: Attitudes toward Sales and Bargains, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Coupon Use on the Rise Figure 2-3: Percent Agreeing “Coupons Draw Me to Stores I Don’t Normally Shop,” Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Brand Names Continue to Appeal to Confident Consumers Table 2-3: Attitudes toward Brand Names, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Table 2-4: Purchase of Store Brands for Items Tracked by Experian Simmons NCS, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Consumers Express Mixed Feelings about Pursuing Quality Table 2-5: Attitudes toward Quality, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Increasing Reliance on Online Shopping Likely to Endure among Post-Recession Consumers Table 2-6: Trends in Shopping on the Internet, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
  6. 6. Shifts in Consumer Demographics during the Great Recession Consumer Confidence a Dynamic Phenomenon Many Changes in Demographic Profile of Anxious and Confident Consumers Figure 2-4: Percent of U.S. Adults Identifying as Conservative Christian Evangelicals Who Are Anxious or Confident Consumers Table 2-7: Profile of Confident Consumers by Selected Demographic Characteristics, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Table 2-8: Profile of Anxious Consumers by Selected Demographic Characteristics, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Hyperpartisan Political Environment Affects Consumer Confidence Table 2-9: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers by Party Identification, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Table 2-10: Percent Classified as Confident Consumers by Party Identification, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Table 2-11: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers by Political Orientation, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Figure 2-5: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers, “Very Conservative” vs. All Adults by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Table 2-12: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers by Race and Hispanic Origin, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009 Table 2-13: Percent Classified as Confident Consumers by Race and Hispanic Origin, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009Market Opportunities in the Post-Recession Era Marketers Try to Redefine Meaning of Value in Unpredictable Post-Recession Environment Competing across Categories Seen as Vital after the Recession Marketers Need to Acknowledge that Not All Post-Recession Consumers Are the Same Even Confident Consumers Remain Cautious Confident Consumers Still Offer the Best Way Forward for Marketers Table 2-14: Aggregate Income of Confident Consumer Households Table 2-15: Aggregate Income of Anxious Consumer HouseholdsChapter 3 Personal Profile of Anxious and Confident ConsumersDemographic Highlights Nearly 48 Million Consumers Categorized as Confident Table 3-1: Number of Anxious and Confident Consumers Younger Consumers Maintain Confidence, Older Consumers More Anxious Table 3-2: Anxious and Confident Consumers by Age Group Men in 45+ Age Group Most Likely to Be Anxious Consumers Figure 3-1: Percent Categorized as Anxious Consumers, Under-45 vs. 45-and- Over Age Groups Figure 3-2: Percent Categorized as Anxious Consumers by Gender and Detailed Age Groups Table 3-3: Anxious and Confident Consumers by Gender and Age Group Older Men More Likely to Face Long-Term Unemployment
  7. 7. Table 3-4: Unemployment Rate and Duration of Unemployment among Men by Age Group, 2009 Multicultural Consumers More Confident Table 3-5: Race and Hispanic Origin, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Regional and Urban Differences Seen Table 3-6: Region of Residence, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 3-7: Percent Living in Metro Markets by Size and Region of Market, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Marital Status Impacts Consumer Confidence Table 3-8: Marital Status, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Larger Households More Confident Table 3-9: Size of Household and Presence of Children, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersEmployment and Income Education Creates Confident Consumers Table 3-10: Educational Achievement, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Job Switching Part of Confident Consumer Profile Table 3-11: Job Experience in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Managers and Professionals Dominate Confident Consumers Table 3-12: Employment Profile, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Multiple Earners in Household Make for Confident Consumers Table 3-13: Number of Employed Adults in Household, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 3-14: Household Income, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 3-15: Employment Income, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Homeownership Generates Anxiety Table 3-16: Homeownership Status, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersLife Views of Anxious and Confident Consumers Views of Life Mirror Level of Economic Confidence Table 3-17: Attitudes toward Life, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Political Orientation Affects Consumer Views Table 3-18: Political Profile, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 3-19: Social and Religious Values, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Memberships Highlight Differences between Anxious and Confident Consumers Figure 3-3: Percent Belonging to Any Membership Group, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 3-20: Memberships, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersChapter 4 Managing Personal FinancesOverview Confident Consumers Are Careful with Their Money Table 4-1: Managing Personal Finances, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers More Worried about Banks Figure 4-1: Percent Uncomfortable Trusting Money to a Bank, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Are Informed Buyers of Financial Services
  8. 8. Table 4-2: Attitudes toward Financial Services, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers More Likely to Hire Tax Preparation Service Figure 4-2: Percent Preferring to Have Professional Prepare Taxes, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersUse of Credit Cards Anxious Consumers More Likely to Use Credit Cards Table 4-3: Use of Credit Cards, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers ATM Cards More Popular with Confident Consumers Figure 4-3: Percent with ATM/Debit Card, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Pay Bills Online Table 4-4: Method Used to Pay Bills, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersBanking and Investing Confident Consumers Less Averse to Risk Figure 4-4: Percent Agreeing that Investing in the Stock Market Is Too Risky, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious and Confident Consumers Equally Likely to Own Investments Table 4-5: Investments Owned, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Likely to Have Savings Accounts Table 4-6: Banking and Investments, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Have More Debt Figure 4-5: Percent with Loans of Any Type, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 4-7: Type of Loans, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersInsurance Life Insurance Important to Confident Consumers Table 4-8: Attitudes toward Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Have More High-Value Life Insurance Policies Table 4-9: Ownership of Life Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Homeowners Insurance More Common in Anxious Consumer Segment Table 4-10: Property and Vehicle Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Health Insurance Varies Table 4-11: Ownership of Health Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersChapter 5 Overview of Shopping BehaviorImportance of Shopping Confident Consumers Like to Shop Table 5-1: Attitudes toward Shopping, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Shop Less Often Figure 5-1: Percent Shopping in Department or Discount Store at least Seven Times in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Figure 5-2: Percent Visiting Shopping Mall in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Convenience Stores Attract Confident Consumers Table 5-2: Shopping in Convenience Stores in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers See Shopping as Experience, Not a Chore Table 5-3: Shopping Behavior, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers New Stores Entice Confident Consumers
  9. 9. Table 5-4: Shopping in New Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers on Quest for Quality Table 5-5: Attitudes toward Buying Quality, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Look for Good Deals Table 5-6: Attitudes toward Sales and Bargains, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Brand Awareness Higher among Confident Consumers Table 5-7: Brand Awareness, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Are Influencers Table 5-8: Impact on Others’ Buying Decisions, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Environmentally Friendly Companies Favored by Confident Consumers Table 5-9: Attitudes toward Going Green, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Prefer to Buy American Figure 5-3: Percent Agreeing that They Buy Goods Produced by Own Country When They Can, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersImpact of Advertising and Promotions Anxious Consumers Don’t Like Advertising Table 5-10: Attitudes toward Advertising, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Out-of-Home Ads Work with Confident Consumers Table 5-11: Impact of Out-of-Home Advertising, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Product Placement Works with Confident Consumers Table 5-12: Impact of Product Placement, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Like Cents-Off Coupons Table 5-13: Use of Cents-Off Coupons, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Manufacturers’ Incentive Offers Draw Attention from Confident Consumers Table 5-14: Use of Incentive Offers from Product Manufacturers, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising Table 5-15: Impact of In-Store Promotions and Advertising, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersOnline and Catalog Shopping Confident Consumers Geared toward Online Shopping Table 5-16: Attitudes toward Online Shopping, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 5-17: Online Activities in Last Seven Days (excluding email), Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Are Big Online Spenders Table 5-18: Amount Spent on Internet in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers See Cellphones as Shopping Tool Figure 5-4: Percent Interested in Using Cellphones for Store Purchases, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Catalog Shopping Appeals to Both Segments Figure 5-5: Percent Buying Merchandise from Catalog in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
  10. 10. Table 5-19: Catalog Shopping in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersPurchasing Patterns Women More Likely to Be Primary Shoppers in Confident Consumer Households Table 5-20: Gender of Primary Shopper, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Inclined to Buy Automobiles and Consumer Electronics Table 5-21: Products Bought in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersChapter 6 Shopping in Supermarkets and Drug StoresSupermarkets and Food Stores New Foods Entice Confident Consumers Table 6-1: Attitudes toward Cooking at Home, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 6-2: Attitudes toward Trying New Foods, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Frozen Dinners Get Nod from Anxious Consumers Table 6-3: Attitudes toward Eating Store-Made Meals and Frozen Dinners, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Less Interested in Grocery Shopping Figure 6-1: Percent Agreeing that “Shopping for Groceries Is a Bore,” Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 6-4: Number of times Shopped in Supermarkets and Food Stores in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 6-5: Average Amount Spent per Week in Supermarkets and Food Stores in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Little Difference in Use of Cents-Off Coupons in Supermarkets Table 6-6: Use of Cents-Off Coupons, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising Table 6-7: Impact of In-Store Promotions and Advertising When Food Shopping, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Lean toward Store Brands in Supermarkets Table 6-8: Overview of Purchase of Store Brands in Supermarkets, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 6-9: Percent of Food Product Users Using Store Brands, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 6-10: Percent Using Store Brands for Non-Food Items in Supermarkets, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersDrug Stores Confident Consumers Shop More Often in Drug Stores Table 6-11: Drug Stores Shopped in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Believe in Vitamins Table 6-12: Attitudes toward Vitamins, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Store Brands More Popular with Anxious Consumers When in Drug Stores Figure 6-2: Percent Agreeing that Over-the-Counter Store Brands Work Just as Well as Advertised Brands, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
  11. 11. Table 6-13: Percent Using Store Brands in Drug Stores, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersChapter 7 Shopping for the HomeConsumer Electronics New Consumer Electronics Products Lure Tech-Savvy Confident Consumers Table 7-1: Attitudes toward Consumer Electronics, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Figure 7-1: Percent Buying Consumer Electronics Products in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Figure 7-2: Percent Planning to Buy New Personal Computer in Future, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Likely to Shop in Consumer Electronics Stores Table 7-2: Shopping in Consumer Electronics Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 7-3: Shopping in Office Supply/Computer Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 7-4: Place of Purchase of Selected Consumer Electronics Products, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Homes of Confident Consumers Filled with Electronics Table 7-5: Ownership of Selected Consumer Electronics Products, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Big TVs Found in Confident Consumer Households Table 7-6: Ownership of Television Sets, DVD Players and VCRs, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersHome Furnishings Home Furnishings Shopping Habits Similar Table 7-7: Shopping in Home Furnishings Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Spend More on Home Furnishings and Bed, Bath & Linens Table 7-8: Expenditures on Household Furnishings and Bed, Bath & Linens in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Household Appliance Purchases Similar Figure 7-3: Percent Buying Major Household Appliance in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Figure 7-4: Percent Buying Small/Countertop Appliance in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersHome Improvement Major Home Remodeling Projects More Common among Confident Consumers Figure 7-5: Percent Carrying Out Any Home Remodeling Project, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 7-9: Remodeling Kitchens and Bathrooms, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Similar Patterns in Shopping in Home Improvement Stores Table 7-10: Shopping in Home Improvement Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
  12. 12. Chapter 8 How Confident and Anxious Consumers Spend Leisure TimeOverview Confident Consumers More Physically Fit Table 8-1: Physical Fitness Programs, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious and Confident Consumers Share Many Leisure Activities Table 8-2: Hobbies and Leisure Activities in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Male Consumers Table 8-3: Hobbies and Leisure Activities in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Female ConsumersHome Entertainment Anxious Consumers less Involved with the Internet Table 8-4: Impact of the Internet, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Many Confident Consumers Tied to the Internet Table 8-5: Internet Usage at Home in Last Seven Days (excluding email), Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 8-6: Online Activities in Last Seven Days (excluding email), Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Video-on-Demand More Popular among Confident Consumers Table 8-7: Access to Cable Television, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 8-8: Video-On-Demand Services, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Primetime Viewing Habits Differ Table 8-9: Primetime Viewing, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Turn Away from CDs to Downloads Table 8-10: Purchase of Music in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Bookstores Still Important Table 8-11: Purchase of Books in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Women in Anxious Consumer Segment More Likely to Read Magazines Table 8-12: Most Popular Magazines, Anxious vs. Confident Female Consumers Many Differences in Magazine Choices of Men in Anxious and Confident Consumer Segments Table 8-13: Differences in Magazine Reading Habits, Anxious vs. Confident Male Consumers Table 8-14: Most Popular Magazines, Anxious vs. Confident Male ConsumersStaying in Touch with Family and Friends Cellphones Vital Part of Lifestyle of Confident Consumers Table 8-15: Attitudes toward Cellphones, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Extra Features Important to Confident Consumers Table 8-16: Ownership and Use of Cellphones , Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersGoing Out Confident Consumers Go Out More Table 8-17: Attendance at Live Entertainment Events in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Movies Major Part of Entertainment Agenda for Confident Consumers
  13. 13. Table 8-18: Movie Attendance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Frequent Users of Fast Food Outlets Table 8-19: Use of Family and Fast Food Restaurants in Last 30 Days, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious and Confident Consumers Choose Same Family and Fast Food Restaurants Table 8-20: Family Restaurants Visited Most, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 8-21: Fast Food Restaurants Visited Most, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersTravel Anxious Consumers Would Rather Stay in the U.S. Table 8-22: Attitudes toward Travel, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Table 8-23: Foreign Travel, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Travel Less Frequently Table 8-24: Domestic Travel, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Good Customers for Travel Service Providers Table 8-25: Use of Travel Services, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Cruises Attract Anxious Consumers Table 8-26: Cruise Ship Vacations, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersChapter 9 Consumer Profiles: Fashion and AutomotiveFashion Confident Consumers Follow Fashion Table 9-1: Attitudes toward Fashion, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Even Confident Consumers Cautious about Spending on Clothes Table 9-2: Attitudes toward Buying Clothes, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Walmart and Target Top Choices for Anxious and Confident Consumers Table 9-3: Department/Discount Stores Shopped in Last Three Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Store Brands of Women’s Lingerie More Popular among Anxious Consumers Table 9-4: Percent Buying Store Brands for Women’s Lingerie, Anxious vs. Confident Women Consumers Clothing Choices Analyzed Table 9-5: Men’s Apparel and Accessories Purchased in Last 12 Months by Anxious and Confident Male Consumers Table 9-6: Women’s Apparel and Accessories Purchased in Last 12 Months by Anxious and Confident Female Consumers Confident Consumers More Likely to Buy Watches Figure 9-1: Percent Buying Watch for Self or Others in Past 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersAutomotive Multiple Vehicles Common in Both Anxious and Confident Consumer Households Table 9-7: Profile of Auto Owners, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Drive Fast Table 9-8: Attitudes toward Cars and Driving, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Options Catch Eye of Confident Consumers
  14. 14. Table 9-9: Reasons for Buying Cars, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers American Cars Get More Respect from Confident Consumers Table 9-10: Attitudes toward Foreign and Domestic Cars, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Anxious Consumers Dial Back Expectations Table 9-11: New and Used Cars, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers More Likely to Spend $30,000 or More for Cars Table 9-12: Amount Spent and Method of Financing Most Recent Vehicle, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers Confident Consumers Plan New Car Purchases in Near Future Table 9-13: Next Vehicle Purchase, Anxious vs. Confident ConsumersAvailable immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2604926US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004

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