Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks in the U.S.: Lifestyle Marketing and New Product Development in the New Economy, 3rd Edition
 

Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks in the U.S.: Lifestyle Marketing and New Product Development in the New Economy, 3rd Edition

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Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks in the U.S.: Lifestyle Marketing and New Product Development in the New Economy, 3rd Edition Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks in the U.S.: Lifestyle Marketing and New Product Development in the New Economy, 3rd Edition Document Transcript

  •    Get more info on this report!Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks in the U.S.: Lifestyle Marketing and New ProductDevelopment in the New Economy, 3rd EditionSeptember 1, 2009Estimating U.S. retail sales of packaged snacks at $68 billion in 2008, Packaged Factsprojects sales to near $82 billion by 2013, a total market increase of 20%. Despite thedampening effects of global recession, consumers are snacking more than ever, thanksto pull-backs in restaurant dining, harried lifestyles that reduce opportunities for sit-downmeals, and a growing consensus that several small meals or snacks during the day areactually healthier than the three-squares paradigm. In addition, as the sluggisheconomy fans job-loss fears, health insurance woes, and environmental and socialjustice anxieties, snack consumers are embracing a “value” mentality that prizes qualityand “whole” ingredients, “better for you” recipes, and green production practices. Whilelow prices are always a draw, consumers are looking for snacks with fewer additives orpreservatives, and even spending extra dollars for organic and premium snack treatsthat can boost their flagging spirits over the long climb back to prosperity.To accommodate the complexities of the U.S. market within shifting economic andcultural contexts, and to contextualize these trends within the global marketplace, thisreport investigates not only the raw numbers associated with product launches, salesand market positions, but also the lifestyle patterns and the financial, social and politicalconcerns that contribute to the rise and fall of snacking trends. While organizing snackproducts into sweet and salty/savory categories as in previous editions, this editionsegments the discussion into four topic chapters based on lifestyle and industryclassifications—Value and Traditional, Functional and Fortified, Natural and Organic,and Premium and Gourmet. The analysis focuses on shelf-stable, packaged snackssold throughout the full retail universe, from national brands and private labels to theoften edgier products of niche gourmet and organic players.Custom Packaged Facts survey data inform our research into snacking attitudes,purchasing patterns, and health and wellness across consumer demographics, withInformation Resources, Inc. sales data and Product Launch Analytics data on newproduct introductions helping to quantify key trends marketwide. Product profilesranging from multinational brands such as Frito-Lay and Hershey to start-up andboutique brands such as Sahale Snacks and Endangered Species provide a nuancedlook into the relationship between consumer attitudes and product development,
  • reflecting the running theme of socially conscious marketing as an important valuedriver in economic times good and bad.Research MethodologyThe information contained in Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks in the U.S. was obtainedfrom primary and secondary research. Primary research entailed consultation withindustry participants; on-site examination of retail venues; and extensive Internetcanvassing. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from a range of businesssources, including trade publications and newsletters; articles in consumer businessnewspapers and magazines; government agencies; industry associations; annualreports, 10Ks and other financial releases from public companies; and other reports byPackaged Facts.Sales estimates are based on data from sources including Information Resources, Inc.’s(IRI) InfoScan Review for mass-market channels (supermarkets, drugstores and massmerchandisers other than Walmart), Progressive Grocer’s annual “ConsumerExpenditures Study,” and SPINSscan data from SPINS, Inc., which tracks grocery salesin natural supermarkets. Data on new product introductions are from Product LaunchAnalytics, a Datamonitor service, based on the specified snack product segments.Our analysis of consumer attitudes and demographics primarily derives from ExperianSimmons’ Fall 2008 National Consumer Study, which is based on the responses ofapproximately 25,000 respondents age 18 or over, and from Packaged Facts’ February2009 online poll of 2,600 U.S. adults, conducted to measure specific food purchasingpatterns and attitudes.Table of ContentsChapter 1: Executive Summary Introduction Scope of Report Two Categories: Sweet and Salty/Savory Snack Classifications and IRI Retail Sales Breakouts Report Methodology U.S. Market Trends U.S. Snack Market at $68 Billion Figure 1-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Snack Foods: 2004, 2008 and 2013 (in billions of dollars) IRI-Tracked Snack Market Dollar Growth Consumers Show Gentle Shift Toward Salty/Savory Salty Snack Segment Shows Greatest Dollar Increase Over 5 Years Table 1-1: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks by Segment, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent)
  • Value and Traditional Snacks Austerity Measures May Be Long-Term Evolving Snack Habits Parallel Consumer Focus on Value, Comfort Snack Marketers Streamline, Innovate, Invest Fragmented Lives See More Frequent Snacking Store Brand Snacks Blaze Ahead on Grocery Shelves Sales Data Show Better-for-You Trend in Snack Choices Functional and Fortified Snacks Willingness to Pay Premium for Nutrient-Rich Foods Function: Inherent or Added Benefits, Fewer Undesirables High and Low Health Claims Among Global Snack Launches Functional Ingredients to Watch Packaged Facts Poll Tracks Functional Preferences Yogurt Snacks, Food Bars Dominate in Functional Foods Yogurt Provides Inherent and Added Benefits Food Bars: Vast Adaptability to Nutritional Niches Natural and Organic Snacks Consumers Call for Authenticity in Natural Claims From Green Valleys to Planetary Ethics Backing Up “Natural” with Specific Claims Dannon’s Natural Yogurt as Brand Leader Popcorn, Potato Chips Are High in Natural Claims Frito-Lay: Better-for-You and Natural Natural/Organic Food Shopper Psychographics Newman’s Own Organic Snacks Donate Millions to Charities Premium and Gourmet Snacks Gourmet Snacks Borrow from Natural and Organic Trends Gourmet Consumers Difficult to Pin Down Love of Foreign Foods Correlates with Tastes for Upscale, Exotic Premium, Gourmet Snacks Emphasize Experience of Eating Mission-Driven Companies Support Indulgence Through Good Works Upscale, Artisan Tags Further Define Premium and Gourmet Snacks Chocolate Dominates in Premium Sweet Snacks Flavor Crossovers in Salty/Savory Snacks Creative Blends of Superior Sweet and Savory Ingredients Funky Monkey Fruit Snacks Make Super Berries Crunchy Dagoba Chocolates Uses Acai, Ginger, Nuts, Rosehips, ChiliChapter 2: Snacking Trends Overview Introduction Scope of Report Two Categories: Sweet and Salty/Savory Snack Classifications and IRI Retail Sales Breakouts Report Methodology U.S. Market Trends U.S. Snack Market at $68 Billion Table 2-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Snack Foods, 2004-2008 (in billions of dollars) View slide
  • Supermarkets Account for 42% of Snack MarketFigure 2-1: Share of U.S. Snack Market Sales by Retail Channel, 2008 (percent)IRI-Tracked Snack Market Dollar Growth Since 2004Table 2-2: IRI-Tracked Sales of Snack Foods, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)IRI-Tracked Growth in Sweet SnacksTable 2-3: IRI-Tracked Sales of Sweet Snacks, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)IRI-Tracked Growth in Salty/Savory SnacksTable 2-4: IRI-Tracked Sales of Salty/Savory Snacks, 2004-2008 (in millions ofdollars)Sweet Snacks Claim 57% of IRI-Tracked SalesFigure 2-2: Share of IRI-Tracked Snack Sales: Sweet vs. Salty/Savory, 2008(percent)Table 2-5: Total Growth in IRI-Tracked Sales of Snack Foods by Category:Sweet vs. Salty/Savory, 2004 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars)Consumers Show Gentle Shift Toward Salty/SavoryFigure 2-3: Consumer Preference for Sweet or Salty Snacks, 2004 vs. 2008(percent of U.S. adults)Salty Snack Segment Shows Greatest Dollar Increase Over 5 YearsTable 2-6: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Snacks by Product Segment, 2004-2008(in millions of dollars)Figure 2-4: Top Five Snack Food Segments by IRI-Tracked Dollar Growth, 2004Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-7: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Sweet and Salty/Savory Snack Foodsby Segment, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent)Yogurt Gains in Sweet Snacks Market ShareTable 2-8: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Sweet Snack Foods by ProductCategory, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent)Uptick in Popularity of Less-Processed “Ingredients” as SnacksTable 2-9: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Salty/Savory Snack Foods by ProductCategory, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent)Private Label Gives Big Brands a Run for Their MoneyTable 2-10: IRI-Tracked Sales of Private Label Snacks, 2004-2008 (in millions ofdollars)Recession Still LoomingRising Food CostsTable 2-11: Consumer Price Index for Food at Home and Selected SnackCategories: 1999-2009But Desire to Simplify, Focus on Health Can Work in Favor of SnacksU.S. Snack Market Projected at $81.6 Billion in 2013Table 2-12: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Snack Foods, 2008-2013 (in billions ofdollars)International Market OutlookWorldwide Snack Introductions Climb SteadilyTable 2-13: Global Snack Product Introductions by Geographic Region, 2008(number)Harried Lifestyles, Globalization Spur Sampling View slide
  • Multifaceted Snacks Market Juggles Tastes, Agendas, Finances Environmental, Social Concerns Add Complexity Yogurt, Food Bars, Fruit Snacks Play Up the Healthy Side of Sweet Table 2-14: Global Sweet Snack Product Introductions by Geographic Region, 2008 (number) Table 2-15: Global Salty/Savory Snack Product Introductions by Geographic Region, 2008 (number) “Upscale” Claims Edge Out “Natural” Table 2-16: Global Snack Product Introductions by Top Package Tags/Claims, 2008 (number and percent) Skeptical Consumers Look for More Measurable ClaimsChapter 3: Value and Traditional Snacks Austerity Measures May Be Long-Term Evolving Snack Habits Parallel Consumer Focus on Value, Comfort Snack Marketers Streamline, Innovate, Invest Consumers Look for Simple, Real, Authentic Across Lifestyle Choices Fragmented Lives See More Frequent Snacking Table 3-1: Percentage Who Agree a Lot with Selected Psychographic Statements About Diet and Nutrition, 2004 vs. 2008 (U.S. adults) Both Men and Women Lack Prep Time for Healthy Meals Puzzling (Small) Reduction in Women’s Preference for Easyto-Prepare Foods Cultural, Economic Realities Edge Out Traditional Family Meals Former “Junk Food” Snacks Must Take Up Nutritional Slack Table 3-2: Percentage Who Agree a Lot with Selected Psychographic Statements About Diet and Snacking: Overall and by Gender, 2008 (U.S. adults) Nutrition, Convenience, Comfort Increasingly Driving Choice Even Low Income Consumers Looking for More Than Just Low Price Private Label Sheds Grungy Image for High Quality Chic Store Brand Snacks Blaze Ahead on Grocery Shelves Table 3-3: IRI-Tracked Sales of Private Label Snacks by Product Segment, 2004 vs. 2008 (in dollars) Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, Safeway Labels Target Consumer Values 75% of Bloggers Give Thumbs Up to Whole Foods 365 Brand 7-Eleven Develops Hundreds of “7-Select” Snack Items Bundling 7-Select Snacks with Foodservice Options Increases Visibility Consumers Like Snacks That Multi-Task as Meals or Ingredients Sales Data Show Better-for-You Trend in Snack Choices Table 3-4: Sweet and Salty/Savory Snacks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Growth: 2007 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars) Table 3-5: Sweet Snacks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales and Market Share by Segment, 2004 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars) Table 3-6: Sweet Snacks: Percentage Change in IRI-Tracked Volume and Unit Sales, 52 Weeks Ending October 2008 vs. Year Ago Period Household Usage Rates Also Tilt Toward Healthier Snacks Table 3-7: Percentage Who Use Selected Sweet Snacks, 2004 vs. 2008 (U.S. adults)
  • Love Affair with Sweets Unlikely to Fizzle Out Women Feel More Guilt About Indulgence Than Men Yogurt and Food Bars: The Virtuous Snack (or Breakfast or Lunch) Yogurt’s Popularity Makes Former “Health Food” an Everyday Snack Yogurt Cups Command Lion’s Share of Yogurt Segment Table 3-8: Yogurt and Food Bars: IRI-Tracked Dollar Growth, 2004 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars) Portability, Convenience, Fun Ingredients Add to Yogurt Snacks’ Appeal Food Bars Mix Crunch, Nutrition, Convenience Worldwide Food Bars Handy for Eating on the Run Figure 3-1: Meal of Day Considered Most Important: Men vs. Women, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults) Comfort and Familiarity May Trump Health: M&Ms Mix Sweet Nostalgia with Marketing Savvy Colorful Candies Adapt to Cultural Needs, Change New Formulations Key, But Consumer Relationships Make M&Ms Iconic “My M&Ms” Allow Personalized, Customized Treats for Events, Occasions Salty/Savory Snacks Trail Sweets in Dollar Value, Growth Table 3-9: Salty/Savory Snacks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Growth and Market Share by Segment, 2004 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars) Table 3-10: Salty/Savory Snacks: Percentage Change in IRITracked Volume and Unit Sales, 52 Weeks Ending October 2008 vs. Year Ago Period Salty Snacks Account for Majority of Category All-American Potato Chips Reign as King of Salty Snacks Table 3-11: Potato Chips: Percentage Change in IRI-Tracked Volume and Unit Sales, 52 Weeks Ending October 2008 vs. Year Ago Period Table 3-12: Salty Snacks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Growth and Market Share by Subsegment, 2004 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Comfort and Familiarity Characterize Potato Chip Sales Table 3-13: Household Usage Rates for Potato Chips by Type, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent of U.S. adults) Volume, Unit Sales Down in Most Salty/Savory Segments, Despite Dollar Growth Table 3-14: Percentage Who Use Selected Salty Snacks, 2004 vs. 2008 (U.S. adults) Frozen Hot Snacks Fill In as Meals, Ingredients, at Home and Work Frito-Lay Brand Accounts for Majority of Potato Chip Sales Newest Challenge to Increase Women’s Consumption of Salty Snacks New Focus on Women’s Values, Relationships Three-Pronged Strategy Focuses on Design, Health, Relationships Revamped Packaging in Soothing Tones Begins with Baked Lays Reorganized Aisle Displays Improve Visibility of “Better for You” Snacks Informal Poll Sees Mixed Reactions to “Women’s Aisle” Idea “Only in a Woman’s World” Highlights “Fearlessly Female” Friendships Campaign Success Too Early to CallChapter 4: Functional and Fortified Snacks Consumers Push for Healthier Snack Options
  • Willingness to Pay Premium for Nutrient-Rich FoodsFunctional Growth Rate Healthy Even in Developing CountriesFunctional Foods of All Sorts Defy Global RecessionFunction: Inherent or Added Benefits, Fewer UndesirablesHigh and Low Health Claims Among Global Snack LaunchesTable 4-1: Global Snack Product Introductions: Functional/Fortified and RelatedClaims, 2008 (number and percent)Functional Ingredients to WatchFigure 4-1: Key Functional References in Global Snack Food Introductions, 2008(number)High Fiber, High Protein Are Top Claims; Probiotics Pique InterestTable 4-2: U.S. Snack Product Introductions: Functional/Fortified and RelatedClaims, 2004 vs. 2008 (number and percent)Packaged Facts Poll Tracks Functional PreferencesTable 4-3: Nutritional Content Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and By Gender: Packaged Facts Poll Respondents, February 2009(percent of U.S. adults)Table 4-4: Nutritional Benefits Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and by Gender: Packaged Facts Poll Respondents, February 2009(percent of U.S. adults)Some Correlation Between Age Bracket and Nutritional TargetsYounger Adults Prize Beauty, Energy, and ImmunityTable 4-5: Nutritional Content Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and by Gender: Gen Y Respondents to Packaged Facts Poll, February2009 (percent of U.S. adults age 18-29)Table 4-6: Nutritional Benefits Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and by Gender: Gen Y Respondents to Packaged Facts Poll, February2009 (percent of U.S. adults age 18-29)Table 4-7: Patterns by Age Bracket for Agreeing a Lot with PsychographicStatement, “I Am Usually Quick To Try Out New Nutritional Products, 2008(percent and index of U.S. adults)Functional Concerns Relatively Lower, Gender-Neutral for Gen XBoomers Balance Vanity, Frailty in Nutritional ConcernsTable 4-8: Nutritional Content Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and by Gender: Gen X Respondents to Packaged Facts Poll, February2009 (percent of U.S. adults age 30-44)Table 4-9: Nutritional Benefits Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and by Gender: Gen X Respondents to Packaged Facts Poll, February2009 (percent of U.S. adults age 18-29)Table 4-10: Nutritional Content Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and by Gender: Baby Boomer Respondents to Packaged Facts Poll,February 2009 (percent of U.S. adults age 45-64)Table 4-11: Nutritional Benefits Sought in Food Purchases in Last 12 Months,Overall and by Gender: Baby Boomer Respondents to Packaged Facts Poll,February 2009 (percent of U.S. adults age 18-29)Seniors Skew to Nutrition
  • Table 4-12: Demographic Patterns for Agreeing A Lot with PsychographicStatement, “Nutritional Value Is Most Important in the Foods I Eat,” 2008(number, percent and index of U.S. adults)CPG Partners with Consumers Toward Healthier SnackingConsumer Distrust of Packaged Snacks Gradually WanesFunction Through Inherent Benefits or FortificationTable 4-13: Demographic Patterns for Agreeing a Lot with PsychographicStatement, “Most Snack Foods Are Not Healthy,” 2008 (number, percent andindex of U.S. adults)Yogurt Snacks, Food Bars Dominate in Functional FoodsYogurt Provides Inherent and Added BenefitsTable 4-14: Global Yogurt Introductions: Selected Functional/Fortified andRelated Claims, 2008 (number and percent)U.S. Yogurt Sales Top $3.7 Billion; Unit Sales Up Despite Price IncreaseTable 4-15: Yogurt and Yogurt Drinks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2004 ThroughOctober 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 4-16: Top Yogurt Brands by IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 52 Weeks EndingOctober 5, 2008 (in millions of dollars)Dannon’s Probiotic Activia Yogurt Snack Maintains High ProfileDanone Advertising Continues Despite Recession“100% Healthy” Portfolio Produces Billions Worldwide“Activia Challenge” Promises Better Digestion in Two WeeksNew Activia Fiber Snacks and Dairy Drinks Round Out SelectionDissatisfied Consumers File LawsuitTuberz Yogurt Snacks for Kids Ride Functional WaveStonyfield and Fage Get High Marks, TooFood Bars: Vast Adaptability to Nutritional NichesTable 4-17: Global Food Bar Introductions: Selected Functional Claims. 2008(number and percent)Food Bars Top $2 Billion in IRI-Tracked SalesTable 4-18: Food Bars: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2004 Through October 2008 (inmillions of dollars)Table 4-19: Demographic Indices for Purchasing of Food Bars: By Type, 2008(U.S. adults)Clif, Power Bars Top Energy/Sports FunctionTable 4-20: Top Three Food Bar Brands by IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 52 WeeksEnding October 5, 2008 (in millions of dollars)Sports Snacks Big on Protein, PortabilityBringing Taste Up to ParProSource’s Supreme Protein Bar: Tastes Like “Gourmet Candy”“Team Supreme” Endorsements Hype Great Taste, Muscle-Building PowerAverage Joes Take to the Candy PartBreakfast and Snack Bars Foreground All-Around NutritionProbiotics Hit Cereal Bar Market, Including Max CrunchAttune Foods Pushes Digestive WellnessWellness and Gut Health Growing Nearly Synonymous
  • Savory, Bakery Snacks Play “Wholeness” Card With Grains, Fiber Steer Clear of Simply Fortifying Junk Food: Retool Recipes Instead Especially in Kids’ Snacks, Keep It Real Nabisco’s Wheat Thins Fiber Up the Crunch Food Should Taste Good Combines Fibrous Function with Refreshing Lack of Coyness Functionality Through Natural or Organic Claims Kudos for Kashi Cookies Table 4-21: Kashi TLC Cookies: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2006 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars) Don’t Discount Candy: Gummy Candies Enter Functional Fray Japanese on Anti-Aging Collagen Kick Meiji “100% Pure Fruit Juice” Series Leads Fortified Gummy Market Better-for-You Through Subtraction: “Low” and “No” Claims Prominent Nearly Half of U.S. Adults Purchase Low- or No-Fat Products Table 4-22: Demographic Patterns for Purchasing of Low-Fat or Fat-Free Products, 2008 (percent and index of U.S. adults) Salt Reduction Likely the Next Less-Is-Better Snack Trend Portion Control: 100-Calorie Club Is a Great Idea, No? “Eat Less! It’s Better for You!” Drop in Sales on Some 100-Calorie Products Suggests a Re-Think Table 4-23: Selected 100-Calorie/Low Calorie Snacks: IRITracked Dollar Sales, 2006 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars) Function in Snacks Should Play Up “Natural” Food Goodness Changing Unhealthy Habits Will Require Consumer Effort, TooChapter 5: Natural and Organic Snacks Consumers Call for Authenticity in Natural Claims From Green Valleys to Planetary Ethics “Natural” Credibility Requires Serious Commitment Backing Up “Natural” with Specific Claims Table 5-1: U.S. and Global Snack Product Introductions: Natural and Related Claims, 2008 (number and percent) Cereal Bars Lead in Sweet Snack Natural Claims Table 5-2: Global Sweet Snack Product Introductions: Natural and Related Claims by Product Segment, 2008 (number) Dannon’s Natural Yogurt as Brand Leader Table 5-3: Selected Natural Sweet Snacks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2004 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars) Popcorn, Potato Chips Are High in Natural Claims Table 5-4: Global Salty Snack Product Introductions: Natural and Related Claims by Product Segment, 2008 (number) Lesser Evil Snacks: More Nice, Less Naughty “Snackcident Prevention” Establishes a Healthy Niche Figure 5-1: Lesser Evil Brand Popcorn Products: 2005 Through October 2008 (in dollars) Frito-Lay: Better-for-You and Natural
  • Table 5-5: Selected Natural Salty/Savory Snacks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2004Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars)Sun Chips Pushing Green Agenda with Solar Power, Biodegradable PackagingCompostable Packaging for Sun ChipsWill Consumers Resist “Natural” Versions of Old Favorites?Table 5-6: Selected Natural Frito-Lay Snacks: IRI-Tracked Sales, 2007 ThroughOctober 2008 (in millions of dollars)Tostitos Naturals: “Three Ingredients Is Good.”Sometimes It’s Simpler Not to Think About the DetailsOrganic/Natural Shoppers Hard to Pin DownJust Looking for High QualityConsumers Focus on Taste and ExperienceNatural/Organic Food Shopper PsychographicsTable 5-7: High Indexing “Agree A Lot” Attitudes Among U.S. Adults Who “Agreea Lot” That They Look for Organic/Natural Foods When They Shop, 2008(percent and index)Preferences for Healthy SnacksNatural/Organic Food Shopper DemographicsTable 5-8: Selected Demographics for U.S. Adults Who “Agree a Lot” That TheyLook for Organic/Natural When They Shop for Food, 2008 (percent and index)Don’t Discount Organic Leanings of Lower Educational, Income BracketsOrganic Snack Claims Jump Higher Than Natural Thanks to Verifiable StandardsOrganic Claims Require Fulfillment of USDA-Certified Green PracticesThree Levels of OrganicLevel 1: “100% Organic” on Principal LabelExplorer’s Bounty: 100% Organic Fruit and Chocolate SnacksLevel 2: Made with Organic Ingredients on Principal LabelSafeway’s O Organic for Toddler Marries Organic with FunctionalLevel 3: Organic Ingredients on Ingredients StatementFrito-Lay’s Natural Blue and Yellow Corn Tostitos Include Organic IngredientsNew Administration Endorses Natural, Local, Organic FoodsOrganic Snack Ingredients Gain in Snack Launches WorldwideTenfold Gain in Organic Claims in Snack Launches from 2004 to 2008Canadian, European Brands Use Organics in Wide Variety of Snack LaunchesNewman’s Own Organic Snacks Donate Millions to CharitiesTable 5-9: Selected Organic Sweet Snacks: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2004Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 5-10: Selected Organic Salty/Savory Snacks: IRITracked Dollar Sales,2004 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars)Private Label Organics Ease the Pain of Premium PricingTrader Joe’s: Wallet-Friendly and HipAuthenticity Adds to Value in Economic DowntimesWegmans Grocery Chain Offers Organic Yogurt SnacksSupport of Locally Grown Produce Includes Wegmans Organic Research FarmPrivate Label Natural and Organic Snacks Offer Variety, ValueFair Trade Agreements Support Equitable Labor Practices
  • Producers, Workers, Trade Terms and Pricing All Fall Under Fairtrade Standards Chocolate Production Sees Increased Fair Trade Commitment French Ethiquable Makes Chocolate a Responsible Indulgence Chocolates, Fruit Chips and Cookies Round Out Ethiquable’s Snacks Organic Claims Cluster in Fair Trade Chocolates Major Chocolate Producers and Marketers Adopt Fair Trade Labor, Green Organizations Pushing Hershey, Mars, Nestle Save The Planet Through Snacking?Chapter 6: Premium and Gourmet Snacks Gourmet Snacks Borrow from Natural and Organic Trends Gourmet Consumers Difficult to Pin Down Asians, Grad Degree Holders, High Income Consumers Most Likely Foodies Table 6-1: Percentage of Adults Who Agree a Lot with the Psychographic Statement, “I Try To Eat Gourmet Food Whenever I Can”: By Demographic, 2008 (percent and index of U.S. adults) Figure 6-1: Highest Indexing Demographic Groups for Agreeing a Lot with the Psychographic Statement, “I Try To Eat Gourmet Food Whenever I Can,” 2008 (U.S. adults) But Appetite for Gourmet Treats Spans Demographic Boundaries Love of Foreign Foods Correlates with Tastes for Upscale, Exotic Asians, Grad Degree Holders, High Income Consumers Favor Global Cuisines Table 6-2: Percentage of Adults Who Agree a Lot with the Psychographic Statement, “I Enjoy Eating Foreign Foods”: By Demographic, 2008 (percent and index of U.S. adults) Figure 6-2: Highest Indexing Demographic Groups for Agreeing a Lot with the Psychographic Statement, “I Enjoy Eating Foreign Foods,” 2008 (index and percent of U.S. adults) Gourmet Is More Occasion Than Lifestyle Table 6-3: Psychographic Patterns for Consumers Who Agree a Lot with the Psychographic Statement, “I Try To Eat Gourmet Food Whenever I Can,” 2008 (percent and index of U.S. adults) Strong Affinities for Organic, Nutritious Foods Parallel Gourmet Tastes Even Gung-Ho Gourmets Show Wide Variation in Attitudes, Habits Fast Food is Fabulous! No, It’s Junk! Spicy is Good! No, It’s Yucky! Hurray for Sugar and Fat!—Now We Feel Guilty Premium, Gourmet Snacks Emphasize Experience of Eating Mission-Driven Companies Support Indulgence Through Good Works Upscale, Artisan Tags Further Define Premium and Gourmet Snacks Table 6-4: Global Snack Product Introductions: Upscale, Gourmet and Related Claims, 2008 (number and percent) Chocolate Dominates in Premium Sweet Snacks Table 6-5a: Global Sweet Snack Product Introductions: Upscale, Gourmet and Artisan Claims by Product Segment, 2008 (number) Table 6-5b: U.S. Sweet Snack Product Introductions: Upscale, Gourmet and Artisan Claims by Product Segment, 2008 (number) Flavor Crossovers in Salty/Savory Snacks
  • Table 6-6a: Global Salty/Savory Snack Product Introductions: Upscale, Gourmetand Artisan Claims by Product Segment, 2008 (number)Table 6-6b: U.S. Salty/Savory Snack Product Introductions: Upscale, Gourmetand Artisan Claims by Product Segment, 2008 (number)Creative Blends of Superior Sweet and Savory IngredientsDried Fruits and Berries Mix It Up with Strong Cheeses, Nuts and HerbsClassic Cuisines Lend Gourmet Flavor to Salty/Savory SnacksInternational Flavors Maintain Strong Influence: Wasabi, Chai, Ginger Pump UpTastebudsOther Little Known Ingredients to Watch: Baobab, Noni, Et AlAcai, Gogi: Exotic Super-Foods Up the AnteBrazilian Acai Berries a Purple Miracle for Discerning PalatesFunky Monkey Fruit Snacks Make Super Berries CrunchyInnovative Use of Acai Bodes Well for Trail Mixes, Snack Bars, ChocolateArtisan Snacks a Nexus of Luxury, Gourmet, Function, StewardshipHershey’s Purchase Boosts Dagoba’s Bottom LineTable 6-7: Selected Premium Chocolate Snacks in Box, Bag or Bar Under 3.5Oz: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2004Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 6-8: Selected Premium Chocolate Snacks in Box, Bag or Bar Under 3.5Oz.: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales, Volume Sales and Price per Pound, 52 WeeksEnding October 2008Tibetan Goji Berries: Bright Red, Tangy, Sweet and SourBissinger Introduces Goji GummiesQuinoa, Amaranth: Little Grains, Big NutritionMixes Well with Sweet and Savory IngredientsContributes to Whole Grain, Multigrain, Gluten-Free TrendsAztecs and Amaranth’s PowersThese Days, It’s Gluten-Free, High Protein VersatilityAfrican Fonio is Highly Nutritious But Labor-Intensive to HarvestHigher Dollar Sales for Premium Mass-Market PopcornNewman’s Own, Orville Redenbacher Dollar Sales Up, Unit Sales DownTable 6-9: Selected Premium Kernel Popcorn Brands: IRITracked Dollar Sales,2004 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 6-10: Selected Premium Kernel Popcorn Brands: IRITracked Unit Sales,Volume Sales and Price per Pound, 52Weeks Ending October 2008Frito-Lay Smart Food Introduces Sweet and Savory Popcorn ClustersArtisan Popcorns Emphasize Small Batches, Hands-On AttentionFrench Truffles Grace Susan Rice Popcorn479 Popcorn: So Gourmet It Merits a Wine PairingSweet and Savory Combinations, International FlavorsPremium Nut Snacks Mix Up Fruits, Spices, SeedsSahale Nut Snacks: International Cuisines Inspire “Culinary Magic”Creative, Edgy Mixtures of Sweet and Salty, Fruits and NutsSales Stumble in Mass Market
  • Table 6-11: Selected Premium Sweet/Savory Snacks: IRITracked Dollar Sales, 2004 Through October 2008 (in millions of dollars) Table 6-12: Selected Premium Sweet/Savory Snacks: IRITracked Unit Sales, Volume Sales and Price per Pound, 52 Weeks Ending October 2008 Mission-Driven Upscale: The Sweet Taste of Stewardship Endangered Species Chocolate: Savor Chocolate, Save Our Planet Corporate Streamlining Increases Sales and Thus Donations Concern from ILRF Long-Term Partnerships Promote Species, Habitat, Humanity Berries, Citrus Dress Up High Cacao Contents Dancing Deer Bakery Founded on Philanthropy, Eco-Friendliness 35% of Sweet Home Retail Prices Donated to Homeless Advocacies Premium Ingredients Impart Rich, Whimsical Recipes in Green Packaging Redneck Gourmet Rubs Shoulders with The BestAppendix: Company AddressesAvailable immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=1939946   US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004