Pet food in the u.s. other pet food health, humanization and high quality ingredients in an increasingly value driven global market
 

Pet food in the u.s. other pet food health, humanization and high quality ingredients in an increasingly value driven global market

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Pet food in the u.s. other pet food health, humanization and high quality ingredients in an increasingly value driven global market Document Transcript

  • 1. Get more info on this report!Pet Food in the U.S.: Other Pet Food: Health, Humanization and HighQuality Ingredients in an Increasingly Value-Driven Global MarketJanuary 1, 2009The U.S. pet food market has not just survived the spring 2007 recalls but proven itsresiliency, with 2007 sales up over previous years and healthy growth continuingthrough 2008. Yet heightened safety concerns on the part of pet food makers andconsumers continue to shape product development and marketing, as well as thechoices of pet owners looking for the safest and healthiest products possible. At the topof the list are kibble, canned and raw/frozen foods made with ingredients that arenatural, organic, grain-free/non-allergenic and pure, as well as made in the U.S.A.,locally grown, “whole” (fruits, vegetables, grains, etc.) and human-grade. Foods makingfunctional appeals also continue to proliferate, especially those targeting age- andweight-related conditions via the inclusion of novel ingredients like glucosamine, omegafatty acids, antioxidants and probiotics. In other words, premium pet foods remain theprimary value growth driver in the U.S. market, with ever higher quality ingredientsfueling the premium wave.At the same time, one thing marketers and retailers at all levels of the market cannotafford given the faltering U.S. and global economies is complacency. More than everbefore the ability to convert pet owners to higher priced products—or keep them buyingthem—will depend on marketers’ success in communicating product benefits andtapping into the ever-potent human/animal bond. Helping to make the case are newcelebrity spokespersons like Cesar Millan with his new Dog Whisperer line, and EllenDeGeneres with her co-ownership in Halo Purely for Pets, with other positive trendsincluding rapid growth in the natural supermarket channel and an increasinglyglobalized market in which ingredients suppliers like Cargill are looking to stake adeeper claim in pet food (in Cargill’s case by specifically targeting the U.S. agriculturalretail channel as well as global markets). At the same time, new products continue toflood the market, which saw more entries in 2008 than in any previous year.Pegging 2008 U.S. sales at $17 billion and global sales at $49 billion—and projectingsteady growth through 2013—the report provides market size estimates for the overallretail universe, while quantifying mass-market sales to the marketer/brand share levelusing data from Information Resources, Inc., and also providing market size andmarketer share figures for the natural supermarket channel. The report thoroughlydocuments competitive, new product and retail trends, as well as trends in pet food
  • 2. purchaser demographics and lifestyle pursuits (media and marketing psychographics,Internet usage, “green” involvement, etc.), based on data from Simmons MarketResearch Bureau, BIGresearch, the American Pet Products Association and othersources.Bringing to bear more than 20 years of experience in analyzing this market and drawingon Packaged Facts’ broad cross-category expertise, Pet Food in the U..S pinpointsstrategic directions for current and prospective marketers, with a forward-looking focuson high-growth product segments and market-driving trends. The report provides acomprehensive Market Overview covering cross-market trends. New features of our2009 edition include focus sections on: The global pet food market (sales overall and by world region, marketer shares, new product trends, U.S. export trends, and more); Recall-related product safety initiatives; Cross-channel private-label activity and prospects; Levels of in-store merchandising and price promotions; Pet food purchasers as coupon users.Also included are dozens of images of pet products and consumer and trade ads.Read an excerpt from this report below.Additional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportSmall Animal Food Purchaser Trends and DemographicsFood treats are the most popular type of small animal food, used by 45% of smallanimal owners in 2006, followed closely by bagged pellets at 44%; however, usage offood treats grew by eight percentage points between 2002 and 2006, while baggedpellets declined by a point during the same period.Alfalfa/hay products also experienced substantial growth, increasing by six percentagepoints to reach 41% in 2006. Three other types fall into the 25-35% range:fruits/vegetables, hamster/gerbil mix and special mixes (i.e., for specific animal types).Boxed pellets experienced the largest drop in share in 2006, only being used by 5% ofsmall animal food purchasers (down from 10% in 2002). [Figure 5-12]Slightly more than 2% of U.S. adults (or nearly 2.4 million people) keep a pet rabbit orhamster based on Spring 2008 Simmons data (rabbits and hamsters are the only small
  • 3. animals represented in the survey). Larger households, especially those with children,are more likely than average to keep these two types of small animal pets.Additionally, homemakers, married couples and individuals without a high schooldegree are also more likely than average to own rabbits and hamsters, as areconsumers with an employment income of $20,000-$39,999 or households with acombined income between $50,000-$99,999. [Table 5-19]TABLE OF CONTENTSChapter 1: Executive Summary Scope of Report Report Methodology Global Market Perspective Value of Pet Food Retail Sales Figure 1-1: Global Retail Sales of Pet Food: 2004, 2008 and 2013 (in billions of dollars) Trends by World Region Marketer Shares and Shifts Market Size and Growth U.S. Pet Food Sales Near $17.0 Billion in 2008 2008 Mass-Market Dollar Sales of Pet Food Up, But Volume Sales Down Dog Food Three-Fifths of the Market Market Share by Retail Channel Market to Approach $19 Billion by 2013 Looking Ahead Competitive Overview Top Five Players Control Four-Fifths of the Market Figure 1-2: Top Five U.S. Marketers of Pet Food: 2006 vs. 2008 (percent) Four Companies Dominate Mass-Market Sales Pet Specialty Channel More Fragmented Mega Marketers Tap In to Natural Segment Multinational Powerhouse Cargill Taps Into Feed/Seed Channel Private Label Pet Food Has Room to Grow in the U.S. Pet Food Producers Position on Safety Marketing and New Product Trends Pet Market Advertising at $520 Million in 2007 Marketers Embracing Non-Traditional Media Advertising Positioned on a Few Major Themes Celebrities Kick In 2008 a Record Year for New Pet Food Products Product Premiumization: Natural, Upscale and Functional Appeals Retail and Consumer Trends Economic Concerns and Increased Competition
  • 4. Over 60 Million Households Own Pets Dog/Cat Ownership Rates Edge Up Minorities Over-Index for Semi-Moist and Canned Products Canned Food Is Stronger in Cat ArenaChapter 2: Market Overview Introduction Scope of Report: Three Main Categories Terminology Exclusions Other Marketing Classifications Global Pet Food Market Perspective Value of Pet Food Retail Sales Figure 2-1: Global Retail Sales of Pet Food: 2004, 2008 and 2013 (in billions of dollars) Market Share and Trends by Region Figure 2-2: Share of Global Pet Food Sales by Region: 2008 (percent) Marketer Shares and Shifts Figure 2-3: Pet Food Global Market Leaders: 2008 (percent) Trends in New Product Introductions Figure 2-4: Number of Global Pet Food New Product Launches: Reports and SKUs, 2002-2008 Figure 2-5: Share of Global Pet Food New Product Launches by Region: 2000, 2004 and 2008 (percent) Top Marketing Claims Involve Natural, Functional Appeals Figure 2-6: Top 20 Package Tags/Marketing Claims: By Number of Global Pet Food New Product Launches, 2008 Global Market Outlook Table 2-1: Top Global Pet Food Industry Forecast Factors: 2007 (percent) Table 2-2: Top Global Pet Food Industry Forecast Trends: 2007 (percent) U.S. Pet Food Exports Up 15% Canada, Japan Are Top Export Markets for U.S. Pet Foods Table 2-3: U.S. Exports of Dog & Cat Foods by Leading Country Markets: 2003- 2007 (in thousands of dollars) Table 2-4: U.S. Exports of Dog & Cat Foods by Leading Country Markets: January-September 2007 vs. January-September 2008 (in thousands of dollars) Figure 2-7: Top National Destinations for U.S. Exports of Dog & Cat Foods: January-September 2008 (percent) Table 2-5: U.S. Exports of Dog & Cat Foods by Regional Markets: 2003-2007 (in thousands of dollars) Table 2-6: U.S. Exports of Dog & Cat Foods by Regional Markets: January- September 2007 vs. January-September 2008 (in thousands of dollars) Table 2-7: Export Concentration Ratios for U.S. Exports of Dog & Cat Foods by Top, Top 4 and Top 8 Markets: 2003-September 2008 (% of total dollar value) European Union Down as Export Destination
  • 5. Figure 2-8: Share of Total U.S. Exports of Dog & Cat Foods by Top DestinationMarkets: Canada, Japan and the European Union, 1996 vs. 2008 (% of totaldollar value)Mars Targets Export Growth Markets in AfricaFigure 2-9: Percent of Survey Respondents Ranking Import/Export Trends as“Very Important” to Development of Pet Food Industry: By Global RegionRising Costs, Down Economy Shape Market EnvironmentMarket Size and GrowthPet Food Sales Near $17.0 Billion in 2008Table 2-8: U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Food: 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)2008 Mass-Market Dollar Sales of Pet Food Up, But Volume Sales DownTable 2-9: IRI-Tracked Dollar, Pound and Unit Sales of Pet Food: 2008 vs. 2007(in millions of dollars, pound and unit sales)A Gradual Improvement from 2003 to 2007Figure 2-10: IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food: 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)Dog Food Delivers the Most Dollar GrowthTable 2-10: IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food: By Category, 2003- 2008 (in millionsof dollars)Table 2-11: Annual Growth/Decline in IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food: ByCategory, 2004-2008 (percent)Table 2-12: Total Growth/Decline in IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food: By Category,2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-13: Total Growth/Decline in IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food: By Segment,2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)Market CompositionDog Food Three-Fifths of the MarketFigure 2-11: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food by Category: 2001, 2003,2005, 2007 and 2008 (percent)Figure 2-12: Share of Pet Food Sales in Natural Supermarkets: By Type, 2008(percent)Dry Food Increasing in Market ShareFigure 2-13: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Dog and Cat Food by Form: 2003,2005, 2007 and 2008 (percent)Table 2-14: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food by Form: 2003, 2005 and2007 (percent)Alternative Pet Food Share of SalesIndependent Pet Stores: Share of Sales by Animal TypeTable 2-15: Alternative Pet Food Segment Performance Relative to Total U.S.Pet Food Market: 2003-2007 (percent, growth rate)Table 2-16: Share of Independent Pet Store Pet Supply Sales by Animal Type:2005-2007 (percent)Table 2-17: Pet Food and Treats Share of Category Sales by Animal Type inIndependent Pet Stores: 2006 vs. 2007 (percent)Dog Food Is Top Category in Pet Specialty StoresTable 2-18: Share of Pet Specialty Retailer Sales by Category: 2006 vs. 2007(percent)
  • 6. Market Share by Retail ChannelFigure 2-14: Share of U.S. Pet Food Sales by Retail Outlet Type: 2008 (percent)Household Purchasing of Pet Supplies by Retail Outlet TypeTable 2-19: Household Purchasing of Pet Products by Retail Channel: TotalPurchasers and Sole Purchasers, 2006 vs. 2008 (percent of U.S. householdswith pets)Figure 2-15: Degree of Channel Loyalty Among Purchasers of Pet Supplies byOutlet Type: 2008 (percent of U.S. households with pets)Chain Merchandising Trends in the Mass MarketDry Dog Food the Most Heavily MerchandisedEphemeral vs. Incremental Merchandising GainsPrice Discounting in Chains Is Steepest for Cat FoodTable 2-20: IRI-Tracked Retailer Merchandising Trends for Pet Food: ByCategory and Segment 4th Quarter 2006 through 3rd Quarter 2008 (percent ofsales volume)Table 2-21: IRI-Tracked Promotion of Dog, Cat and Other Pet Food: Ratio ofAverage Promoted Price to Average Overall Price, 2003 - Third Quarter 2008(percent)Market OutlookAll Eyes on the EconomyFigure 2-16: U.S. Grocery Industry Sales Growth: 2001-2007 (percent)Table 2-22: Percentage of Adults with Little or No Confidence in Short-TermProspects for the Economy: April 2003-April 2008 (U.S. adults)Table 2-23: Percentage of Adults Who Are More Practical or Realistic in TheirPurchases, Month Over Month: October 2007-April 2008 (U.S. adults)Pet Market ImpactPet Food Prices, Costs at Record HighsFigure 2-17: Consumer Price Index for Pet Food: 1998-2008Figure 2-18: Producer Price Index for Pet Food: 1998-2008Impact of Spring 2007 Pet Food RecallsFigure 2-19: Effect of Pet Food Recall on Pet Food Sales in Pet Specialty Stores:May 2007 (percent)Figure 2-20: Effect of Pet Food Recall on Pet Specialty Retailer Pet FoodSelection: January 2008 (percent)Figure 2-21: Seasonal Pattern of Pet Food Sales in the Natural SupermarketChannel: January 2005-December 2007Product Premiumization and Premium DemographicsTable 2-24: IRI-Tracked Volume Sales of Pet Food by Category and Segment:2003 - Third Quarter 2008 (in millions of volume units)Table 2-25: Average U.S. Household Expenditures on Pet Food: 1997-2007 (indollars)Figure 2-22: Share of Total U.S. Pet Market Expenditures: $70K+ vs. Under$70K Income Brackets, 1997-2007 (percent)Figure 2-23: Number of New Pet Food Product Introductions: 2001, 2004 and2008Natural/Organic Pet Food Going Strong
  • 7. Figure 2-24: U.S. Retail Sales of Natural Pet Food: 2003, 2007 and 2012 (inmillions of dollars)Pet Humanization a Potent ForceTable 2-26: Mean Number of Veterinary Visits by Human-Animal Bond AmongDog and Cat Households: 2006Table 2-27: Mean Veterinary Expenditures by Human-Animal Bond Among Dogand Cat Households: 2006 (in dollars)Enhancing Pet HealthAging Pet Population Underpins Healthcare BoomFigure 2-25: Percentage of Dogs and Cats Age 6 and Over: 1996 vs. 2006(percent)Number of Dog and Cat Households on the UpsFigure 2-26: Household Penetration Rates for Selected Dog- or Cat-OwningClassifications: 2003 vs. 2008 (percent of U.S. dogor cat-owning households)The Boomer FactorTable 2-28: Dog and Cat Ownership by Adult Age Bracket: 2008 (number,percent and index of U.S. households)Figure 2-27: Dog or Cat Ownership Rates by Age Bracket: 2003 vs. 2008(percent of U.S. households)Figure 2-28: Share of Total U.S. Population Growth for Selected Age Brackets:2007-2015 (percent)Dual-Adult/No-Kid CloutFigure 2-29: Two-Adult Households/No Kids as Pet Owners: 2003 vs. 2008(percent)Celebrities Back Up and Coming Pet Food LinesLooking AheadThe New Value EquationFigure 2-30: Share of Total U.S. Pet Market Expenditures: $70K+ vs. Under$70K Income Brackets: 1997-2007 (percent)Market to Approach $19 Billion by 2013Table 2-29: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Food: 2008-2013 (in millions ofdollars)Additional Market ConsolidationProduct InnovationCompetitive OverviewAcquisitions Intensify Market ConsolidationTable 2-30: Timeline of U.S. Pet Food Market Acquisitions: 2002- 2008Mars Plus NutroCastor & Pollux, Halo Backed by Private Equity FirmsTop Five Players Control Four-Fifths of the MarketFigure 2-31: Top Five U.S. Marketers of Pet Food: 2006 vs. 2008 (percent)Four Companies Dominate Mass-Market SalesFigure 2-32: Top Marketers of Pet Food by Share of IRI-Tracked Sales: 2007 vs.2008 (percent)Table 2-31: Leading Marketers of Pet Food by Share of IRITracked Sales: 1999-2007 (percent)
  • 8. Table 2-32: Leading Marketers of Pet Food: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales byProduct Segment: 2007 vs. 2008 (percent)Pet Specialty Channel More FragmentedFigure 2-33: No. 1 Brand Leaders in Pet Specialty Stores: 2007 (percent)Professional Channel MarketersValue and Superpremium Positioned MarketersSnacks and Treats Specialists, “Springboarding”Natural/Organic Specialists Exclusive to Specialty, Natural ChannelsBrand Leaders in the Natural Supermarket ChannelFigure 2-34: Share of Sales of Pet Products in Natural Supermarkets byMarketer/Brand: 2008 (percent)Mega Marketers Tap In to Natural SegmentRaw/Frozen and Homemade Pet Food SpecialistsNature’s Variety a Leader in Raw/Frozen FoodsFreshpet Makes Refrigerated Pet Food SplashFigure 2-35: IRI-Tracked U.S. Sales of Freshpet Refrigerated Pet Food: 2006-2008 (in millions of dollars)Channel-Specific MarketingMultinational Powerhouse Cargill Taps Into Feed/Seed ChannelCrossing Pet Market LinesTable 2-33: The U.S. Pet Food Market: Selected Leading Marketers and Brands,2008Focus on Private LabelRoom to GrowTable 2-34: Number of U.S. Private-Label Pet Food Product Introductions andSKUs: By Category, 2000-2008Evanger’s and Eagle Pack Report Recall-Related GainsStore-Brand Share Stabilizes at Mass-Market Level Following Steady DeclinesTable 2-35: Private-Label Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Food: By ProductCategory and Segment, 1999-2007 (percent)Mars Plus DoaneWhole Foods and Traders Joe’s Big on Private LabelPetSmart and Petco Heavily Invested in Store BrandsFigure 2-36: National Consumer Advertising Spending for PetSmart and Petco:2006 and 2007 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-36: PetSmart and Petco Pet Food and Treat Private-Label Brands: ByTrademark Name, Usage and Filing DateIndependent Pet Stores Also Making a BidTable 2-37: Purchasing Patterns for Selected Types of Store- Brand Dog and CatFood: By Retail Channel Shopped, 2008 (percent)The Global Private-Label Pet Food PictureThe Future of Private LabelFocus on Pet Food Recalls and Product SafetyCompetitive Impact of Spring 2007 Pet Food RecallsMenu Foods Blindsided But on the MendLawsuits Consolidated, Settled
  • 9. Procter & Gamble’s Iams Unit Loses Sales and ShareMars Fares Well, Snaps up Nutro and Menu Foods PlantPet Food Commission Releases Safety RecommendationsCongress Passes Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007New Regulations Also Possible at the State LevelNew Requirements for Chinese ImportsPet Food Producers Position on SafetyThe New Food Safety Buzzword: TraceabilityProduct Safety Still Under Consumer, Government SpotlightConsumer Website Accuses Nutro of Fielding Unsafe FoodsFDA Targets Evanger’s PlantPetco Distribution Center Raided by FDAMars Recalls Reveal Human-Pet Disease LinkMarketing and New Product TrendsPet Market Advertising at $520 Million in 2007Figure 2-37: Media Breakout of National Consumer Advertising for Pet Food andPet Care Products: 2007 (percent)Marketers Embracing Non-Traditional MediaOnline Marketing and BlogsPet Food “SuperBrands”Advertising Positioned on a Few Major ThemesCelebrities Kick InEllen Buys into HaloCesar Millan Shakes Hands with Castor & Pollux, PetcoRachael Ray Teams Up with Dad’s Pet CareFreshpet Launches Loved Dog TreatsCause-Related Marketing, Public RelationsGoing Green2008 a Record Year for New Pet Food ProductsTable 2-38: Number of New Pet Food Product Introductions: 2001-2008Product Premiumization: Natural, Upscale and Functional AppealsNatural Products Go MainstreamManufacturers Focusing on Fresh IngredientsNew Goodlife Packaging Is Ingredient-FocusedSafety Theme Apparent in Ingredient-Related Product AppealsHuman-Grade Ingredients100% US-Sourced Ingredients and “China-Free”Locally Sourced IngredientsRaw/Frozen FoodsHomemade Pet Food“Holistic Labeling”Functional/Fortified Foods Cover All BasesSpecial Diet FormulasTable 2-39: Household Purchasing of Light/Weight Management and Senior Dryand Canned Dog and Cat Food: 2004 vs. 2008 (U.S. households with dogs orcats)
  • 10. Nutraceutical TreatsConvenience Another Key Premium AppealOne Route to Cost Cutting: Smaller Package SizesTable 2-40: Pet Food Product Selling Points by Package Tags: 2004-2008Examples of AdvertisingRetail TrendsEconomic Concerns and Increased CompetitionThe PetSmart/Petco Dynamic DuoTable 2-41: PetSmart and Petco Combined Sales: 2000-2007 (in millions ofdollars)Company Profile: PetSmart, Inc.Table 2-42: PetSmart Sales: 2000-2007 (in millions of dollars)Slower Expansion an “Economic Precaution”Services, Expertise Key to SuccessCompany Profile: PetcoTable 2-43: Petco Annual Sales: 2000-2007 (in millions of dollars)Changes and ChallengesPromoting Pet RelationshipsCesar Millan and Ellen DeGeneresP.A.L.S., Petco.com and Petco ParkZootoo.com and Pet WelfareOther Top-Ranked Pet Specialty ChainsIndependent Pet Stores: Bad News and Good NewsTable 2-44: Top Challenges Pet Specialty Retailers Face in Next Two Years:2006 vs. 2007 (percent)Table 2-45: Pet Food Share of Category Sales by Animal Type in IndependentPet Stores: 2006 vs. 2007 (percent)Walmart Bullish on Pet SuppliesTarget Also Coming on StrongSupermarkets Hanging on After 2007 RecallsWholesale Clubs and Dollar StoresNatural Supermarkets Going StrongThe Internet EffectLeading E-tailers of Pet Food and SuppliesPet Ownership Trends and DemographicsThe Simmons Survey SystemOver 60 Million Households Own PetsTable 2-46: Pet Ownership in the United States: 2008 (percent and number ofU.S. households)Dog/Cat Ownership Rates Edge UpTable 2-47: Dog and Cat Ownership in the United States: 2004, 2006 and 2008(percent and number of U.S. households)38% of Pet Households Keep Multiple TypesFigure 2-38: Ownership of Multiple Types of Pets: 2008 (percent of pet-owningU.S. households)63% of Pet Households Keep More Than One Pet
  • 11. Table 2-48: Ownership of Multiple Pets of a Single Type: 2008 (percent of U.S.households who keep pets of a given type)Pet Household DemographicsPet Ownership Holds Up Across Age BracketsFigure 2-39: Dog or Cat Ownership Rates by Age Bracket: 2003 vs. 2008(percent of U.S. households)Demographic Variations by Type of PetsTable 2-49: Demographics for Keeping Pets, 2008 (percent, number and indexamong U.S. consumers)Table 2-50: Demographic Overview for Selected Pet Classifications, 2008(percent of U.S. households)Pet Owners as ConsumersHousehold Purchasing of Pet Supplies by Retail Outlet TypeTable 2-51: Household Purchasing of Pet Products by Retail Channel: TotalPurchasers and Sole Purchasers, 2006 vs. 2008 (U.S. households with pets)Table 2-52: Demographic Overview for Selected Pet Product Retail Channels,2008 ( U.S. pet-owning households)Channel Choices in Organic Pet Food PurchasingTable 2-53: Where Groceries Are Most Often Purchased by Selected RetailerType: Shoppers Overall vs. Organic Pet Food Purchasers, August 2008(percentage of U.S. adults)Table 2-54: Where Groceries Are Most Often Purchased by Selected RetailChain: Shoppers Overall vs. Organic Pet Food Purchasers, August 2008(percentage of U.S. adults)Pet Food Purchasing Overview for Dog or Cat OwnersTable 2-55: Household Purchasing of Packaged Dog and Cat Food by Type,2008 (U.S. households with dogs or cats)Pet Owners Are Internet-ProneFigure 2-40: Use/Influence of the Internet: Adults Overall vs. Dog or Cat Owners,2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall vs. dog or cat owners)Figure 2-41: Use/Influence of the Internet: Adults Overall vs. Dog or Cat Owners,2008 (index for U.S. dog or cat owners)Figure 2-42: Dog or Cat Owners as Consumers: Selected Media & MarketingPsychographics, 2008 (percent and index for U.S. dog or cat owners)Not So “Green”Figure 2-43: Dog or Cat Owners as Consumers: Selected “Green”Psychographics, 2008 (percent and index for U.S. dog or cat owners)The Pet Food Coupon ClipperTable 2-56: Indicators for Use of Pet Food Coupons: 2008 (index among dog- orcat-owning households)Bulk of Redemption through Grocery StoresTable 2-57: Coupon Redemption Rates by Selected Retailer Type: 2004-2008(percent)Figure 2-44: Coupon Redemption Rates Among Pet Food Coupon Users: BySelected Retailer Type, 2008 (percent)Grocery vs. Pet Food Coupon Usage Rates
  • 12. Table 2-58: Coupon Usage Rates by Product Type: 2004-2008 (percent) On-Shelf Coupons Generate Highest Usage Table 2-59: Coupon Usage Rates by Product Type: 2004-2008 (percent)Chapter 3: Other Pet Food Market Size and Composition Category Scope Total Other Pet Food Sales at $907 Million in 2008 Figure 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Other Pet Food: 2005, 2008 and 2013 (in millions of dollars) Figure 3-2: Share of Sales of Other Pet Food by Animal Type: 2008 (percent) 2008 IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales Up, Unit Sales Down Table 3-1: IRI-Tracked Dollar and Unit Sales of Other Pet Food: 2008 vs. 2007 (in millions of dollars and units) Sales Recover from Multi-Year Downturn Independent Pet Stores: Share of Sales by Animal Type Figure 3-3: IRI-Tracked Sales of Other Pet Food: 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars) Table 3-2: Share of Independent Pet Store Pet Supply Sales by Animal Type: 2005-2007 (percent) Fish Products: Share of Sales by Product Category Table 3-3: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Fish Products by Category: 2005-2007 (percent) Bird Products: Share of Sales by Product Category Table 3-4: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Bird Products by Category: 2005-2007 (percent) Herptile Products: Share of Sales by Product Category Table 3-5: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Herptile Products by Category: 2005-2007 (percent) Small Mammal Products: Share of Sales by Product Category Table 3-6: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Small Mammal Products by Category: 2005-2007 (percent) Share of Other Pet Food Sales by Retail Channel Figure 3-4: Share of U.S. Other Pet Food Sales by Retail Outlet Type: 2008 (percent) Mass-Market Merchandising Trends for Other Pet Foods Table 3-7: IRI-Tracked Retailer Merchandising Trends for Other Pet Foods: 4th Quarter 2006 through 3rd Quarter 2008 (percent of sales volume) Price Discounting in Chains Is Steepest for Cat Food Table 3-8: IRI-Tracked Promotion of Dog, Cat and Other Pet Food: Ratio of Average Promoted Price to Average Overall Price, 2003 - Third Quarter 2008 (percent) Competitive Trends Marketer Overview Leading Pet Specialty Channel Brands Central Garden & Pet on Top in Mass-Market Outlets
  • 13. Figure 3-5: Top Marketers of Other Pet Food by Share of IRITracked Sales: 2007vs. 2008 (percent)Audubon Park Posts Biggest Dollar GainsWardley and Tetra Control Fish/Reptile SegmentFigure 3-6: Top Marketers of Fish/Reptile Food by Share of IRITracked Sales:2007 vs. 2008 (percent)Table 3-9: Other Pet Food Brand Leaders in Pet Specialty Stores: 2004, 2006and 2007 (percent)Table 3-10: Leading Marketers of Other Pet Food by IRI-Tracked Sales andMarket Share: 2007 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-11: Leading Marketers and Brand of Other Pet Food by Mass-MarketShare: 2007 vs. 2008 (percent)Table 3-12: Marketers and Brands of Other Pet Food by IRITracked Sales andMarket Share: 2007 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-13: Top Ten Other Pet Food Products by Dollar Gain in IRI-TrackedSales: 2007 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-14: Marketers and Brands of Fish/Herptile Food by IRITracked Sales andMarket Share: 2007 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Company ProfilesCentral Garden & Pet: Corporate OverviewA Leader in InnovationSuccess in Pet Specialty, Mass-Market ChannelsHartz Mountain Corp.Corporate OverviewMass-Market Sales SlippingFigure 3-7: IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share of Hartz Mountain Other PetFood: 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)Vitakraft/Sun Seed CoCorporate OverviewAcquisitions Spur Global GrowthA New Leader in the U.S. Pet Specialty MarketFigure 3-8: Percentage of Retailers Citing Sun Seed Brand as No. 1 Brand in PetSpecialty Channel: 2006 vs. 2007 (percent)Marketing and New Product TrendsMarketing TrendsNew Product ThrustsTrends in Bird FoodCook and Serve FoodsBird TreatsNatural and OrganicSingle-Serving SizesFortified FoodsTrends in Small Animal FoodSpecies-Specific FoodsSpecial Diets and SupplementsGourmet Foods
  • 14. Grass Hay “Growing” Foods Trends in Fish Food Fish Treats Expanded Food Choices Gourmet Diets Clean and Clear Water Trends in Herptile Food Live Food Innovations Live vs. Frozen Species-Specific Prepared Foods Medicated Foods Table 3-15: Bird, Small Animal, Fish and Herptile Food: Selected New Product Introductions, 2007-2008 Examples of Other Pet Food Advertising Consumer Focus: Other Pet Food Purchasers Methodology Population Trends: Household Penetration Increasing for All Animal Types Table 3-16: Pet Ownership in the United States: 2008 (percent and number of U.S. Households) Fish Food Purchaser Trends and Demographics Figure 3-9: Type of Freshwater and Saltwater Fish Food Purchased: 1996 vs. 2006 (percent) Figure 3-10: Outlet Where Freshwater and Saltwater Fish Food Flakes Are Purchased: 2006 (percent) Demographics for Keeping Pet Fish Bird Food Purchaser Trends and Demographics Figure 3-11: Types of Bird Food and Packages Purchased in the Past 12 Months: 2002 vs. 2006 (percent) Small Animal Food Purchaser Trends and Demographics Figure 3-12: Type of Small Animal Food Purchased in the Past 12 Months: 2002 vs. 2006 (percent) Reptile Food Purchaser Trends and Demographics Figure 3-13: Type of Reptile Food Purchased in the Past 12 Months: 1996 vs. 2006 (percent) Table 3-17: Demographics for Keeping Pet Fish, 2008 (percent, number and index among U.S. consumers) Table 3-18: Demographics for Keeping Pet Birds, 2008 (percent, number and index among U.S. consumers) Table 3-19: Demographics for Keeping Pet Rabbits or Hamsters, 2008 (percent, number and index among U.S. consumers) Table 3-20: Demographics for Keeping Pet Reptiles, 2008 (percent, number and index among U.S. consumers)Available immediately for Online Download at
  • 15. http://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2088607US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004