Get more info on this report!Nuclear Energy Technologies Worldwide: Components andManufacturingMay 1, 2009Manufacturers of...
Scope and MethodologyThis Specialists in Business Information (SBI) report covers several components of thenuclear energy ...
report examines the countries geared for rapid expansion of their nuclear generatingprograms and looks at the long-term gr...
Outside of North America several nations, including China, Russia, and France, haveindicated their intentions for greater ...
European Nuclear Energy Technology Trends     Table 1-5: Europe Nuclear Electricity Installed Capacity, 2008 to 2013     (...
Through 2013     Reactor Construction Starts Increase     Table 3-5: Total Shutdown Nuclear Reactors by Country     Table ...
Figure 4-2: Share of Shipment Value of Nuclear Energy Components,2004 and 2009Nuclear Energy Technology ExportsTable 4-9: ...
Table 4-25: Estimated Growth of Nuclear Installed Capacity in Asia,     2008 to 2013 (in MWh)     Figure 4-6: Share of Nuc...
and percent)     Company News     Acquisitions and Divestitures     Personnel Changes     Mitsubishi Heavy Industries     ...
Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy     Table 7-1: Spending on Energy Lobbying in 2008     EU Countries Differ on Nuclear ...
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Nuclear energy technologies worldwide components and manufacturing

  1. 1. Get more info on this report!Nuclear Energy Technologies Worldwide: Components andManufacturingMay 1, 2009Manufacturers of nuclear reactor components are entering a pivotal period as the newglobal landscape of global nuclear energy production takes shape. Nations committedto constructing next-generation nuclear facilities that leverage the latest technology willdepend on manufacturers to provide high quality products that foster a safe, secure,and enduring environment for nuclear energy production.Governments, meanwhile, are challenged by the weak global economy that hastightened credit needed to fund some of their long-term nuclear energy initiatives.Suppliers to the nuclear energy construction market are also attempting to keep pacewith increased demand as they struggle to stay afloat with a reduced labor force. Thecompanies, which include Areva and Mitsubishi, are leveraging their economies of scalein energy markets by collaborating and aligning with competitors to gain market shareand increase their installed base of customers.The U.S. is the global leader in nuclear energy technology manufacturing, having a totalmarket value of nearly $45.2 billion in 2002 and growing to an estimated $50.8 billion byyear-end 2009. By 2013, SBI estimates that the U.S. market value will reach $61.1billion, growing at an eleven-year Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 2.8%.The U.S., France, and Japan comprise more than half of the global value of nuclearenergy technology manufacturing. SBI estimates that France’s market value will growfrom $28.9 billion in 2009 to $34.8 billion in 2013 (3.4% CAGR) and Japan will growfrom $19.6 billion to $23.7 billion (3.4%) in 2013. On a share basis, through 2013, thetop three manufacturing nations will maintain their leadership positions, although theywill lose share to other nations such as China and South Korea, which will acceleratetheir manufacturing efforts.On a CAGR basis, however, SBI projects that through 2013 the Netherlands andPakistan will grow at the fastest rates, 15.9% and 31.6%, respectively, and afford thegreatest market opportunities for suppliers to the nuclear technology manufacturingindustry.
  2. 2. Scope and MethodologyThis Specialists in Business Information (SBI) report covers several components of thenuclear energy technology industry around the world, including: Overall market value of nuclear energy technology manufacturing Consumption of nuclear energy compared to other electricity-generating sources, including renewable energy Nuclear power plant installations and their energy-generating capacities Consumer attitudes towards nuclear energy safety and use Innovations in nuclear energy technologies and their future potential Costs and benefits of nuclear energy adoptionMethodologyThe report covers shipments, imports and exports, as well as the economic and markettrends driving the nuclear technology industry. We identify key market trends anddynamics, and profile major market players, outlining their strategies to maximizegrowth and profitability.SBI’s research methodology for this report involved aggregating, synthesizing, andanalyzing data from several sources, including government and several third-partymarket research syndicated data suppliers. We have also conducted in-depth interviewswith leading experts on nuclear energy manufacturing and production potential.Historical data relating to the manufacturing and distribution of products are culled fromgovernment sources. Analysis of these data provides the foundation for our projectionsof overall market size and growth through 2013. Our projections also take into accountdata that indirectly affects the growth of the nuclear energy market, such as informationprovided by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable EnergyLaboratory. Another component of our forecasts is the in-depth interviews we conductedwith industry experts, including: Karen Daifuku, Chief of External Relations and Public Affairs, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, France Colin Hunt, Research Director, Canadian Nuclear Association John Moens, Nuclear Industry Specialist, U.S. Department of Energy Trevor Findley, Director of Nuclear Energy Futures Project, Centre for International Governance Innovation, Waterloo, Canada Leslie Kass, Director, Business Policy and Programs, Nuclear Energy Institute, Washington, DCHow You Will Benefit from this ReportManufacturers of nuclear energy technology used in reactors and its associatedcomponents will benefit from this report by thoroughly understanding the market size ofnuclear energy installations globally and the near-term opportunities for growth. The
  3. 3. report examines the countries geared for rapid expansion of their nuclear generatingprograms and looks at the long-term growth potential for manufacturers of large-scalereactors that leverage next-generation, or Generation III and IV, reactor technologies.Manufacturers will find the report provides a thorough analysis of how companies areinnovating their products to compete.This report also will help: Nuclear industry Research and Development Professionals keep abreast of competitor initiatives, and product innovations Advertising and Public Relations Agencies working with clients in the nuclear energy sector to create targeted and compelling messages about the benefits of nuclear energy technology products Business Development Executives of nuclear energy companies to identify potential partnerships, and detect new product applications. Government executives leading national efforts to grow nuclear energy installation capacities and adopt leading-edge technologiesAdditional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportGlobal Market ValuesThe U.S. is the global leader in nuclear energy technology manufacturing, having a totalmarket value of nearly $45.2 billion in 2002 and growing to an estimated $50.8 billion byyear-end 2009. By 2013, SBI estimates that the U.S. market value will reach $61.1billion, growing at an eleven-year Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 2.8%.The U.S., France, and Japan comprise more than half of the global value of nuclearenergy technology manufacturing. SBI estimates that France’s market value will growfrom $28.9 billion in 2009 to $34.8 billion in 2013 (3.4% CAGR) and Japan will growfrom $19.6 billion to $23.7 billion (3.4%) in 2013. On a share basis, through 2013, thetop three manufacturing nations will maintain their leadership positions, although theywill lose share to other nations such as China and South Korea, which will acceleratetheir manufacturing efforts. On a CAGR basis, however, SBI projects that through 2013the Netherlands and Pakistan will grow at the fastest rates, 15.9% and 31.6%,respectively, and afford the greatest market opportunities for suppliers to the nucleartechnology manufacturing industry.European Nuclear Energy Technology Trends
  4. 4. Outside of North America several nations, including China, Russia, and France, haveindicated their intentions for greater dependence on nuclear energy and acceleratedspending on nuclear manufacturing. Most reactor initiatives through 2030 are plannedfor Asia, where rapidly-growing economies are keeping pace with rising demand forelectricity. South Korea plans to bring eight reactors into operation by 2015 while Japanhas two reactors under construction. India has six reactors being built through 2010 andten additional units are planned well into the next decade. Six large reactors are alreadyunder construction in Russia and due for completion in 2012.Most nuclear energy-focused countries have stepped up their government financing ofresearch and development initiatives due to growing concern about the energy’ssecurity and effect on the environment. Funding from the private sector, however, islargely going to research on development of Generation IV nuclear energy technologies.There is debate over the levels of research and development expenditures on nuclearenergy compared to other emerging energy sources, such as renewables. SBIleveraged data available from the International Energy Association (IEA) to projectfuture expenditures on nuclear research compared to research on other energysources. We estimate that total spending on R&D in nuclear among IEA participatingnations will reach $1.8 billion in 2009, compared to $1.3 billion for fossil fuels and $1.2billion for renewables. By 2013, spending on renewables will rival nuclear energy R&Defforts with governments and private sectors spending $2.7 billion for renewables and$2.4 billion on nuclear.TABLE OF CONTENTSChapter 1: Executive Summary Outlook for World Energy Consumption Figure 1-1: Share of Electricity Generation by Source 2005, 2010 and 2015 Carbon Emissions and the Growth in Demand Reactor Construction Starts Increase Table 1-1: Total Shutdown Nuclear Reactors by Country Skilled Labor Shortage Uranium Supplies Global Market Values Table 1-2: Global Market Value of Nuclear Energy Technology Manufacturing (in $ millions) North American Capacity Table 1-3: North American Share and Generating Capacity of Nuclear Energy, 2002 to 2008 (in MWh) U.S. Shipments of Nuclear Energy Components Table 1-4: U.S. Shipment Value of Nuclear Energy Technology Components, 2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ millions) Nuclear Energy Technology Exports U.S. Imports of Nuclear Energy Components
  5. 5. European Nuclear Energy Technology Trends Table 1-5: Europe Nuclear Electricity Installed Capacity, 2008 to 2013 (in MW hours) Europe’s Aging Energy Infrastructure Asia Market Trends Table 1-6: Asia Share and Generating Capacity of Nuclear Energy, 2002 to 2008 (in MWh) China Nuclear Construction Plans Asia, Europe Poised for Growth Table 1-7: Estimated Growth of Nuclear Installed Capacity in Asia, 2008 to 2013 (in MWh) Table 1-8: Estimated Global Growth of Nuclear Installed Capacity, 2008 to 2013 (in MWh) Research and Development of Generation IV Technology Innovations Differ by Nation Future Nuclear Energy Systems Instrumentation and Control Systems Small Nuclear Power Reactors Consumer Perceptions of Nuclear Energy Adoption of Safety Standards Needed Goals for Nuclear Safety Technologies Improve SafetyChapter 2: Introduction and Overview Report Scope Methodology Terminology Nuclear Reactor Technologies Generation 3 Reactor Designs Table 2-1: Nuclear Reactor Designs Generation IV Nuclear Reactor Designs Uranium ConversionChapter 3: World Nuclear Activities and Technologies Outlook for World Energy Consumption by Source Table 3-1: World Consumption of Energy by Energy Types and Country Group, 2002, 2008, and 2009 (in quadrillion BTUs) Figure 3-1: Global Share of Energy Consumption by Source, 2009 vs. 2013 Table 3-2: Global Electricity Generation by Fuel Source, 2005 to 2030 (trillions of KWh) Figure 3-2: Share of Electricity Generation by Source 2005, 2010 and 2015 (percent) Figure 3-3: U.S. Emissions of Carbon Dioxide in Billions of Metric Tons, 2009 and 2013 Carbon Emissions and the Growth in Demand Table 3-3: World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region (millions of metric tons of CO2) Table 3-4: Estimated Country Nuclear Capacity and Capacity Change
  6. 6. Through 2013 Reactor Construction Starts Increase Table 3-5: Total Shutdown Nuclear Reactors by Country Table 3-6: Nuclear Power Plants Under Construction by Country Table 3-7: Next-Generation Nuclear Reactor Construction Starts by Country Table 3-8: Current Nuclear Reactor Construction by Reactor Type and Megawatts Figure 3-4: Producer Price Index for Key Nuclear Reactor Components, 1999 to 2013 (e) Table 3-9: U.S. Fuel Production Costs, by Fuel Type, 2002 to 2013 (e) (in cents per Kilowatt hours) Table 3-10:U.S. Production and Operation Expenses for Power Generation by Power Source, 2002, 2009 and 2013 (in $ millions) Skilled Labor Shortage Uranium Supplies Table 3-11: U.S. Trend of Uranium Purchases and Sales, 2002 to 2009 (millions of pounds and $ dollars per pound) Nuclear Energy Technology Research Table 3-12: Average Expenditures on Energy Research and Development by IEA Nations, 2000, 2005 with Projections by SBI for 2009 and 2013 (in U.S. $ millions) Research on Nuclear Technology SafeguardsChapter 4: World Nuclear Market Trends Global Market Values Figure 4-1: Compound Annual Growth Rate of Nuclear Energy Technology Market Value by Country, 2002 to 2013 Table 4-1: Global Market Value of Nuclear Energy Technology Manufacturing (in millions of $) Global Nuclear Energy Technology Generating Capacity Table 4-2: Global Share and Generating Capacity of Nuclear Energy (in MWh) North American Capacity Table 4-3: North American Share and Generating Capacity of Nuclear Energy (in MWh) Table 4-4: North American Share and Generating Capacity of Nuclear Energy (in MWh) Table 4-5: U.S. Forecast Share of Nuclear Energy, 2002 to 2013 (watt-hours) Table 4-6: U.S. Share of Nuclear Energy Capacity by State, 2005 to 2008 (in MWh) Table 4-7: U.S. Share of Nuclear Energy Capacity by State, 2008 to 2013 (in MWh) U.S. Shipments of Nuclear Energy Components Table 4-8: U.S. Shipment Value of Nuclear Energy Technology Components, 2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ millions)
  7. 7. Figure 4-2: Share of Shipment Value of Nuclear Energy Components,2004 and 2009Nuclear Energy Technology ExportsTable 4-9: U.S. Export Value of Nuclear Energy Technology Components,2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ millions)Table 4-10: U.S. Export Value of Metal Tanks by Country, 2004 to 2009 (e)(in $ millions)Table 4-11: U.S. Export Value of Metal Cans by Country, 2004 to 2009 (e)(in $ millions)Figure 4-3: Share of U.S. Export Value of Inorganic Chemicals, 2009(percent)U.S. Imports of Nuclear Energy ComponentsTable 4-12: U.S. Import Value of Nuclear Energy Technology Components,2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ millions)Table 4-13: U.S. Import Value of Inorganic Chemicals by Country,2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ millions)Table 4-14: U.S. Import Value of Power Boilers and Heat Exchangers byCountry, 2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ millions)Table 4-15: U.S. Market Value of Nuclear Energy Technology, 2004 to 2009(e) (in $ millions)Figure 4-4: U.S. Imports and Exports as a Percentage of Total Market Value,2004 to 2009Table 4-16: U.S. Shipment and Market Value of Nuclear Energy TechnologyComponents, 2009 to 2013 (e) (in $ millions)Figure 4-5: U.S. Nuclear Energy Technology Manufacturing Market Valueand Growth, 2009 to 2013European Nuclear Energy Technology TrendsTable 4-17: Europe Installed Capacity of Nuclear Energy Technology, 2002to 2008 (e) (in MWh)Table 4-18: Europe Nuclear Electricity Installed Capacity, 2008 to 2013(in MW hours)Table 4-19: Europe Nuclear Electricity Exports, 2002 to 2013 (in MW)Europe’s Aging Energy InfrastructureNations Split on Nuclear AdoptionAsia Market TrendsTable 4-20: Asia Share and Generating Capacity of Nuclear Energy,2002 to 2008 (in MWh)China Nuclear Construction PlansTable 4-21: China’s Operating Nuclear Power PlantsIndia Accelerates Nuclear ActivityTable 4-22: India’s Nuclear Reactor Construction InitiativesJapan Commits to NuclearTable 4-23: Japan’s Nuclear Reactor InitiativesSouth Korea Addresses Nuclear ConcernsTable 4-24: South Korea Nuclear Reactor Installed BaseAsia, Europe Poised for Growth
  8. 8. Table 4-25: Estimated Growth of Nuclear Installed Capacity in Asia, 2008 to 2013 (in MWh) Figure 4-6: Share of Nuclear Energy Installed Capacity in Asia, 2008 and 2013 Table 4-26: Estimated Global Growth of Nuclear Installed Capacity, 2008 to 2013 (in MWh) Figure 4-7: Global Share of Nuclear Energy Installed Capacity, 2008 and 2013 (in MWh)Chapter 5: Manufacturer Profiles Areva Corporate Background Figure 5-1: Areva’s 2008 Share of Revenues by Division (percent) Product and Brand Portfolio Performance Company News Acquisitions and Divestitures Outlook Personnel Changes Bharat Heavy Electricals (BHEL) Corporate Background Products Performance and Outlook Company News Acquisitions and Divestitures Personnel Changes Atomic Energy of Canada (CANDU) Corporate Background Product and Brand Portfolio Performance Figure 5-2: Atomic Energy of Canada 2008 Share of Revenue (in $ millions) Company News Acquisitions and Divestitures Outlook Larsen and Toubro Corporate Background Product and Brand Portfolio Performance and Outlook Figure 5-3: L&T Revenue Trend, 2003 to 2008 (in $ billions and percent) Company News Acquisitions and Divestitures McDermott International Corporate Background Product and Brand Portfolio Performance Figure 5-4: McDermott International’s Revenue, 2005 to 2008 (in $ billions
  9. 9. and percent) Company News Acquisitions and Divestitures Personnel Changes Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Corporate Background Performance Figure 5-5: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Revenues, 2004 to 2008 (in $ billions and percent) Outlook Table 5-1: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Revenues, 2007 and 2008, by Division (in $ billions) Company News Toshiba Westinghouse Corporate Background Product and Brand Portfolio Performance and Outlook Company News General Electric Hitachi Nuclear Energy Corporate Background Figure 5-6: General Electric Co. Energy Infrastructure Division Revenues and Year-Over-Year Growth, 2005 to 2008 (in $ billions) Table 5-2: GE Share of Revenues by Business Unit, 2007 and 2008 Product and Brand Portfolio Company NewsChapter 6: Innovations in Nuclear Energy Technology Research and Development of Generation IV Technology Table 6-1: Certification Status for New Reactor Designs in the U.S. Innovations Differ by Nation Innovations in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Future Nuclear Energy Systems Instrumentation and Control Systems Instrumentation and Control Components Digital I&C Equipment Small Nuclear Power Reactors Small Reactor Prototypes Table 6-2: Small Nuclear Reactor Designs and Locations Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Reactors Toshiba Designs Small Reactor for Japan Molten Salt Reactors (MSR)Chapter 7: Consumers of Nuclear Energy Consumer Perceptions of Nuclear Energy Adoption of Safety Standards Needed Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Goals for Nuclear Safety Technologies Improve Safety
  10. 10. Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy Table 7-1: Spending on Energy Lobbying in 2008 EU Countries Differ on Nuclear Acceptance Table 7-2: Percent of EU Citizens in Favor of Nuclear Energy, by Nation Public Opinion on Nuclear Safety Figure 7-1: U.S. Opinion on Building Nuclear Power Plants Figure 7-2: U.S. Adult Opinions on Nuclear Energy, 2008 One Third of Americans Oppose Nuclear Power ConstructionAppendixAvailable immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=1926673US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004

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