Get more info on this report!The Global Footwear Market: Athletic and non-Athletic ShoesAugus...
Table of ContentsChapter 1: Executive Summary      Scope of Report      Product Categories      MethodologyGlobal Footwear...
U.S. Footwear Market     U.S. Footwear Market to Suffer from Thriftier Consumer Habits     Figure 1-9: U.S. Footwear Retai...
Integration Important as Media Preferences Shift     Jimmy Choo Out of The Shoe Box Thinking     Virtual Marketing and Eta...
Global Footwear Market Rises 2% Driven by Asia, Latin America      European Growth Tempers      U.S. Drags the Global Mark...
Table 2-6: U.S. Footwear Import Volume by Top 10 Countries of Origin, 2004-     2008 (in millions of pairs)     Figure 2-6...
Table 2-11: Global Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume Forecast and Year-over-      Year Percentage Change, 2008-2013 (in m...
Non-Store Retail: Catalog     Non-Store Retail: The InternetFootwear Retail Sales by Major Channels     Shoe Stores Remain...
Adidas at Number 2      Other Top Competitors: Puma, Asics, New Balance, C&J Clark      Table 4-1: Selected Footwear Marke...
Figure 4-5: Nike, Inc. Footwear Net Sales and Percent of Total Net Sales, 2005-     2009 (in millions $)     Table 4-4: Ni...
Table 4-10: Under Armour Footwear Product Portfolio     Timeline of Significant Events     Table 4-11: Under Armour Timeli...
Figure 4-16: Share of Jones Apparel Group Total Net Sales by Geographic     Region, 2008 (%)     Footwear Sales     Figure...
Figure 4-21: Adidas AG Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)     Table 4-23: Adidas AG Total Net Sales and Year-over-...
Timeline of Significant Events        Table 4-29: Genesco Inc. Timeline of Significant EventsCrocs        Overview        ...
Figure 5-3: Quarterly Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE), 1992-Q1, 2009(in trillions $)Fashion and Footwear Industrie...
Sustainable Initiatives are Financially Viable      Deckers Finds a Simple Way to Sustainability      Naturalizer and Dres...
Figure 5-15: RSVP Lyndsey Cushioned by Foot Petals     The Science of Footwear     Figure 5-16: Optimus Prime inspired Nik...
Word-of-Mouth: Added-Value for Marketers and Consumers     Footwear Clubs Breed WOM     Social Networking to Play Big Part...
Figure 7-2: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Women’s Footwear Bought inthe Past 12 Months, 2004-2009 (%)Penetration W...
Table 7-13: Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers who Agree a Lot     with the Statement: Shoe Brand or Designer is...
Price, Selection, Quality and Location Top Shoe Retail Drivers     Table 7-21: Top Consumer Shoe Retail Drivers for Men an...
Table 8-3: Demographic Characteristics of Casual Sneaker Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Exercise and Walking Purchasers Sk...
Table 8-12: Demographic Characteristics of Nike Shoe Purchasers, by Sex, 2009(index)Table 8-13: Psychographic Characterist...
Table 8-25: Psychographic Characteristics of Converse Shoe Purchasers, 2009       (index)       Puma Purchasers Demographi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Global Footwear Market: Athletic and non-Athletic Shoes, The

3,299

Published on

1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • nice report.... thanks
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,299
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
114
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Global Footwear Market: Athletic and non-Athletic Shoes, The

  1. 1.    Get more info on this report!The Global Footwear Market: Athletic and non-Athletic ShoesAugust 1, 2009Footwear is a huge and increasingly diversified business, driven by a host ofdemographic, lifestyle and fashion trends. As a result, the industry is being segmentedever more finely as seen in the diversity of mainstream footwear trends — from casualcomfort to sexy stiletto, and the fact that, in recent years, a far greater range of styleshas become acceptable in the U.S. workplace. The liberalization of footwear normscoincided with an era of greed and seemingly endless conspicuous consumption where$150 sneakers and $500 pumps were easily consumed with ever-expanding consumercredit.However, with a new economic reality comes a paradigm shift in the consumer mindset.For some consumers, charge now and pay later has been replaced with pay now ordon’t buy at all. Instead of feeling good about expensive or ostentatious brands as theyhave in the past, many consumers will increasingly feel good about getting the bestvalue, making the smartest choice, or not spending at all in 2009. The surge in frugalityhas brought back a variety of money-saving behaviors from days of yore, such aslayaway and home cooked meals. Even cobblers are making a comeback.Packaged Facts estimates the global footwear market at retail grew two percent overthe 2007 level of $189.3 billion to $192.3 billion in 2008. Though the U.S. market grewat an annual rate of six percent between 2004 and 2008, growth in 2008 was muchmore subdued at less than two percent. For the footwear industry, an ongoingconsumer paradigm shift in attitudes towards greater frugality and less conspicuousconsumption means high-flying fashion brands may suffer at the expense of lessexpensive alternatives. But can the major marketers and retailers adapt?The Global Footwear Market: Athletic and non-Athletic Shoes examines these questionsand many others by looking at the current market, trends, major brands, and consumerpreferences. The report presents concise, thought provoking analysis of various aspectsof the footwear industry and provides a forecast for the market through 2013.
  2. 2. Table of ContentsChapter 1: Executive Summary Scope of Report Product Categories MethodologyGlobal Footwear Market Global Footwear Market Rises 2% Driven by Asia, Latin America Figure 1-1: Global Footwear Retail Market, 2004-2008 (in billions $) Unit Volume Declines Globally Figure 1-2: Global Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs)U.S. Footwear Retail Market U.S. Footwear Market Flat Figure 1-3: U.S. Footwear Retail Market and Percent of Global Footwear Market, 2004-2008 (in billions $) U.S. Unit Volume Declines Figure 1-4: U.S. Footwear Apparent Consumption by Volume and Percent of Global Footwear Market, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs) Imports Dominate U.S. Market Figure 1-5: Share U.S. Footwear Import Volume by Top 10 Countries of Origin, 2008 (%) U.S. Footwear Sales by Consumer Group & Major Product Category Figure 1-6: Share of U.S. Footwear Retail Sales by Consumer Group and Major Product Category, 2008 (%)Global Footwear Market Forecast Global Footwear Market to Reach $238 Billion by 2013 Figure 1-7: Global Footwear Retail Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in billions $).9 Global Unit Volume Consumption to Reach 12.1 Billion Pairs Figure 1-8: Global Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume Forecast, 2008-2013 (in millions of pairs)
  3. 3. U.S. Footwear Market U.S. Footwear Market to Suffer from Thriftier Consumer Habits Figure 1-9: U.S. Footwear Retail Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in billions $) Unit Volume Declines Globally Figure 1-10: U.S. Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume Forecast, 2008-2013 (in millions of pairs)Footwear Retail Sales by Major Channels Figure 1-11: Share of U.S. Footwear Sales by Major Channel, 2008 (%)Competitive Landscape Footwear Market Highly Fragmented Table 1-1: Selected Footwear Marketers with Footwear Sales Greater Than $1 Billion, 2004-2008 (in millions $)Marketplace and Consumer Trends Down Economy Means Thriftier Consumer Fashion and Footwear Industries Feeling the Pinch Figure 1-12: Quarterly Clothing and Clothing Accessory Store Sales, 1992-Q1, 2009 (in billions $) Consumer Footwear Expenditures Kids Footwear Has Three Protections Company Ethics and Added Values Important to Consumers Counterfeiting, a Dangerous Business Industry Hopes to See End Depression-Era Tax Style and Innovation Trends: Personalized Footwear Comfort versus Style: Footwear No longer Easily Categorized Technology Offers Good Shoes and Good Health Aggressive Designs Versus Staid Style Marketing Outreach Recession Time to Engage Loyal Consumers
  4. 4. Integration Important as Media Preferences Shift Jimmy Choo Out of The Shoe Box Thinking Virtual Marketing and Etail Make Most of Recession Dollars All the Simplicity of Email Make Use of Alternative Advertising Media The Puma Past Masher Behavioral Targeting in Diverse Consumer Market Word-of-Mouth Increasingly Important Social Networking to Play Big Part in WOM Don’t Forget the Human Touch Product Placement Opportunities Abound Nike Active in Broadcast Placement Reliance on Sports Icons Shifting More to Celebrity Payless and Summer Rayne Oakes Go GreenFootwear Consumer Men’s Athletic Footwear Penetration Levels Highest at 20% Table 1-2: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Men’s Footwear Bought in the Past 12 Months, 2004-2009 (%) Women’s Non-Athletic Footwear Penetration Levels Highest at 23% Table 1-3: Consumer Penetration Levels for Women’s Footwear Bought in the Past 12 Months, 2004-2009 (%) For Footwear, Consumers Shop Wal-Mart Most Table 1-4: Consumer Penetration Levels for Stores Shopped Most Often for Shoes, by Women, Men and Total Population, 2006-2008 (%)Chapter 2: The Market Scope of Report Product Categories MethodologyGlobal Footwear Market
  5. 5. Global Footwear Market Rises 2% Driven by Asia, Latin America European Growth Tempers U.S. Drags the Global Market Down Figure 2-1: Global Footwear Retail Market, 2004-2008 (in billions $) Global Five-Year Growth at 6% Table 2-1: Global Footwear Retail Market and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Unit Volume Declines Globally Figure 2-2: Global Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs) Table 2-2: Global Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs)U.S. Footwear Retail Market U.S. Footwear Market Flat Figure 2-3: U.S. Footwear Retail Market and Percent of Global Footwear Market, 2004-2008 (in billions $) U.S. Market Losing Global Dominance Table 2-3: U.S. Footwear Retail Market and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) U.S. Unit Volume Declines Figure 2-4: U.S. Footwear Apparent Consumption by Volume and Percent of Global Footwear Market, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs) Table 2-4: U.S. Footwear Apparent Consumption by Volume and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs) Imports Dominate U.S. Market Figure 2-5: U.S. Footwear Import Volume and Percent of Apparent Consumption, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs) Table 2-5: U.S. Footwear Import Volume and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs) China Imports Declining Is Vietnam the New China for U.S. Imports?
  6. 6. Table 2-6: U.S. Footwear Import Volume by Top 10 Countries of Origin, 2004- 2008 (in millions of pairs) Figure 2-6: U.S. Footwear Import Volume Shares, by Top 10 Countries of Origin, 2008 (%) U.S. Footwear Sales by Consumer Group: Women, Men, Kids Table 2-7: U.S. Footwear Retail Market by Consumer Group, Women, Men, Kids, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Figure 2-7: Share of U.S. Footwear Retail Market by Consumer Group, 2008 (%) U.S. Footwear Sales by Major Product Category Table 2-8: U.S. Footwear Retail Market by Major Product Category, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Figure 2-8: Share of U.S. Footwear Retail Market by Major Product Category, 2008 (%) U.S. Footwear Sales by Consumer Group & Major Product Category Women’s, Children’s Athletic Footwear Strong Men’s, Children’s Non-Athletic Decline Table 2-9: U.S. Footwear Retail Market by Consumer & Major Product Type, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Women’s Non-Athletic, Men’s Athletic Growth Stable Figure 2-9: Share of U.S. Footwear Retail Sales by Consumer Group and Major Product Category, 2008 (%)Global Footwear Market Forecast Global Footwear Market to Reach $238 Billion by 2013 Figure 2-10: Global Footwear Retail Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in billions $) Global Growth at Annual Rate of 4% Table 2-10: Global Footwear Retail Market and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2008-2013 (in millions $) Global Unit Volume Consumption to Reach 12.1 Billion Pairs Figure 2-11: Global Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume Forecast, 2008-2013 (in millions of pairs)
  7. 7. Table 2-11: Global Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume Forecast and Year-over- Year Percentage Change, 2008-2013 (in millions of pairs)U.S. Footwear Market U.S. Footwear Market to Suffer from Thriftier Consumer Habits Figure 2-12: U.S. Footwear Retail Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in billions $) U.S. Global Market Share to Drop Two Points by 2013 Overall Growth Estimated at 1% Annually to Reach $48.4 Billion Table 2-12: U.S. Footwear Retail Market Forecast and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Segments to Show Similar Growth Table 2-13: U.S. Footwear Retail Market Forecast by Consumer Group & Major Product Category, 2008-2013 (in millions $) Unit Volume Declines Globally Figure 2-13: U.S. Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume Forecast, 2008-2013 (in millions of pairs) Table 2-14: U.S. Footwear Retail Market Unit Volume Forecast and Year-over- Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions of pairs)Chapter 3: Retail & Distribution Overview Footwear Distribution Method and Class Method: Wholesale or Direct Class: Authorized or Mass Footwear Retail Channels Overview Shoe Stores Discount Shoe Stores Sporting Goods and Athletic Shoe Stores General Merchandise: Mass Discounters General Merchandise: Department Stores and National Chains Apparel: Specialty Apparel Stores Apparel: Off-Pricers
  8. 8. Non-Store Retail: Catalog Non-Store Retail: The InternetFootwear Retail Sales by Major Channels Shoe Stores Remain the Medium of Choice Table 3-1: U.S. Footwear Retail Market by Major Channel, 2004-2008 (in millions $) General Merchandise Stores Still Second, but Struggling Apparel Stores Less of a Force Sporting Goods Stores on the Rise Catalogs Tried and True, Internet Still on Trial Zappos.com Gets in Step Figure 3-1: Share of U.S. Footwear Sales by Major Channel, 2008 (%) Footwear as a Percent of Retailer Sales by Channel Table 3-2: U.S. Footwear Retail Sales as a Percent of Selected Retail Channel Sales, 2004-2008 (%)Retail Channels and Stores by Consumer Preference Footwear Consumers Prefer to Shop at Specialty Apparel Stores Figure 3-2: Consumer Penetration Levels for Type of Retail Shopped Most Often for Shoes, by Adult Users, 2008 (%) Wal-Mart, Payless Still Top Choice for Consumers Kohl’s Hopes Celebrity Will Kick Sales Up a Notch Economy Hard on Off-Pricers Too And from Behind Comes Famous Footwear Table 3-3: Consumer Penetration Levels for Stores Shopped Most Often for Shoes, by Adult Users, 2006-2008 (%)Chapter 4: Competitive Landscape Overview Footwear Market Highly Fragmented Nike the Global Leader
  9. 9. Adidas at Number 2 Other Top Competitors: Puma, Asics, New Balance, C&J Clark Table 4-1: Selected Footwear Marketers with Footwear Sales Greater Than $1.0 Billion, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Athletic Footwear Market More Concentrated at Top Niche Athletic Sales Lower but Offerings Diverse Nike Leads U.S. Footwear Market with Double-Digit Share Followed By Adidas, Jones Apparel in Single Digits Privately Held Companies Share Considerable Table 4-2: Selected Global Footwear Marketers with U.S. Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Figure 4-1: Share of U.S. Footwear Wholesale Market by Selected Company, 2008 (%) Consolidation and Strategic Acquisitions All but Stopped Nike on the Prowl? Skechers Diggin’ in Its Heelys LaCrosse Footwear, Inc. Expands with Sustainable AcquisitionSelected Company ProfilesNike, Inc. Overview Performance Figure 4-2: Nike, Inc. Total Net Sales, 2005-2009 (in millions $) Table 4-3: Nike, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2005-2009 (in millions $) Sales by Product Category Figure 4-3: Share of Nike, Inc. Total Net Sales by Product Category, 2009 (%) Sales by Geographic Region Figure 4-4: Share of Nike, Inc. Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2009 (%) Footwear Sales Solid Despite Economy
  10. 10. Figure 4-5: Nike, Inc. Footwear Net Sales and Percent of Total Net Sales, 2005- 2009 (in millions $) Table 4-4: Nike, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2005-2009 (in millions $) Cole Haan, Converse and Other Sales Did Suffer Figure 4-6: Nike, Inc. Net Sales of Cole Haan, Converse & Other Products and Percent of Total Net Sales, 2005-2009 (in millions $) Table 4-5: Nike, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2005-2009 (in millions $) Brand Portfolio Table 4-6: Nike Brand Portfolio Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-7: Nike Timeline of Significant EventsUnder Armour, Inc. Overview Performance Figure 4-7: Under Armour, Inc. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-8: Under Armour, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Sales by Product Category Figure 4-8: Share of Under Armour, Inc. Total Net Sales by Product Category, 2008 (%) Sales by Geographic Region Figure 4-9: Share of Under Armour, Inc. Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2008 (%) Footwear Sales See Astounding Incremental Growth Figure 4-10: Under Armour, Inc. Footwear Net Sales and Percent of Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-9: Under Armour, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Product Portfolio
  11. 11. Table 4-10: Under Armour Footwear Product Portfolio Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-11: Under Armour Timeline of Significant EventsSkechers, USA Inc. Overview Performance Figure 4-11: Skechers USA, Inc. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-12: Skechers USA, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Sales by Channel Figure 4-12: Share of Skechers USA, Inc. Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%) Sales by Geographic Region Figure 4-13: Share of Skechers USA, Inc. Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2008 (%) Product Portfolio Table 4-13: Skechers USA Footwear Product Portfolio Table 4-14: Skechers USA Licensed Footwear Product Portfolio Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-15: Skechers USA Timeline of Significant EventsJones Apparel Group Overview Performance Figure 4-14: Jones Apparel Group Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-16: Jones Apparel Group Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Sales by Channel Figure 4-15: Share of Jones Apparel Group Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%) Sales by Geographic Region
  12. 12. Figure 4-16: Share of Jones Apparel Group Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2008 (%) Footwear Sales Figure 4-17: Jones Apparel Group Footwear & Accessories Net Sales and Percent of Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)) Table 4-17: Jones Apparel Group Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Brand & Product Portfolio Table 4-18: Jones Apparel Group Footwear Product Portfolio Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-19: Jones Apparel Group Timeline of Significant EventsDeckers Outdoor Corporation Overview Performance Figure 4-18: Deckers Outdoor Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-20: Deckers Outdoor Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Sales by Channel Figure 4-19: Share of Deckers Outdoor Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%) Sales by Geographic Region Figure 4-20: Share of Deckers Outdoor Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2008 (%) Brand Portfolio Table 4-21: Deckers Outdoor Footwear Product Portfolio Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-22: Deckers Outdoor Timeline of Significant EventsAdidas AG Overview Performance
  13. 13. Figure 4-21: Adidas AG Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-23: Adidas AG Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Sales by Product Figure 4-22: Share of Adidas AG Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%) Sales by Geographic Region Figure 4-23: Share of Adidas AG Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2008 (%) Sales by Division Figure 4-24: Share of Adidas AG Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2008 (%) Footwear Sales Grew 11% in 2008 Figure 4-25: Adidas AG Total Footwear Net Sales and Percent of Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-24: Adidas AG Total Footwear Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Brand Portfolio Table 4-25: Adidas AG Footwear Brand Portfolio Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-26: Adidas AG Timeline of Significant EventsGenesco, Inc. Overview Performance Figure 4-26: Genesco Inc. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-27: Adidas AG Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Sales by Division Figure 4-27: Share of Genesco Inc. Total Net Sales by Division, 2008 (%) Brand Portfolio Table 4-28: Genesco Inc. Footwear Brand Portfolio
  14. 14. Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-29: Genesco Inc. Timeline of Significant EventsCrocs Overview Performance Figure 4-28: Crocs, Inc. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-30: Crocs, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Sales by Product Figure 4-29: Share of Crocs, Inc. Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%) Sales by Geographic Region Figure 4-30: Share of Crocs, Inc. Total Net Sales by Geographic Region, 2008 (%) Footwear Sales Figure 4-31: Crocs, Inc. Total Footwear Net Sales and Percent of Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 4-31: Crocs, Inc. Total Footwear Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Brand Portfolio Table 4-32: Crocs, Inc. Footwear Brand Portfolio Timeline of Significant Events Table 4-33: Crocs, Inc. Timeline of Significant EventsChapter 5: Marketplace and Consumer Trends Thriftiness Hot in a Down Economy The Return of the Cobbler Figure 5-1: Total Sales for Footwear and Leather Goods Repair Establishments, 2003-2007 (in millions $) Consumers Cut Back Figure 5-2: Quarterly Retail & Foodservice Sales, 1992-Q1, 2009 (in billions $)
  15. 15. Figure 5-3: Quarterly Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE), 1992-Q1, 2009(in trillions $)Fashion and Footwear Industries Feeling the PinchFigure 5-4: Quarterly Clothing and Clothing Accessory Store Sales, 1992-Q1,2009 (in billions $)High-End Branded Footwear Toughing it OutConsumer Footwear ExpendituresFigure 5-5: Average Annual Footwear Expenditure Per Consumer Unit: AllConsumers Units, 2003-2007 ($)Table 5-1: Average Annual Footwear Expenditure Per Consumer Unit byHousehold Income Before Tax, 2003-2007 ($)Table 5-2: Average Annual Footwear Expenditure Per Consumer Unit by Age ofReference Person, 2003-2007 ($)Table 5-3: Average Annual Footwear Expenditure Per Consumer Unit by Race orEthnic Origin of Reference Person, 2003-2007 ($)Table 5-4: Average Annual Footwear Expenditure Per Consumer Unit by Region,2003-2007 ($)Table 5-5: Average Annual Footwear Expenditure Per Consumer Unit byEducation Level, 2003-2007($)Kids Footwear Has Built-In Protections38 Million Kids by 1212Figure 5-6: Population Forecast of U.S. Kids Age 3-11, 2008-2012 (in millions)An Influential Force with Buying PowerFigure 5-7: Spending Power Forecast of U.S. Kids Age 3-11, 2008-2012 (inbillions $)Cool Licenses Trump AllFigure 5-8: The Inchworm ShoeKids Express Themselves with Crocs’s Jibbitz CharmsCompany Ethics and Added Values Important to ConsumersGlobal Consumers: Will Spend More on Ethical BrandsGreen Particularly Important to Youth to a (Price) Point
  16. 16. Sustainable Initiatives are Financially Viable Deckers Finds a Simple Way to Sustainability Naturalizer and Dress for Success TOMS Shoes One for One Danner and the Fallen Officers Drive Counterfeiting, a Dangerous Business Staggering Consequences Counterfeit Counter-Intelligence Industry Hopes to See End Depression-Era TaxStyle and Innovation Trends Free to Re-Invent Me Make Me Unique: Personalized Footwear Figure 5-9: Adidas’ Customizable Mi Originals Work Shoes Get the Custom Treatment Emotional Pulls the Shoes Strings Too High End Activity Interchangeable Shoes Figure 5-10: Sandals with Interchangeable Upper or Band Finding Comfort in a Pair of Shoes Comfort versus Style: Footwear No Longer Easily Categorized Shoe Comfort Gets More Accessible Comfort Shoe Brands Break the Mold Figure 5-11: Privo’s Acacia Slip-on with Flex-Fit Figure 5-12: Indigo’s Sweetie Pump with ABS Heel Figure 5-13: Unstructured’s Un.radke Ankle Boot Figure 5-14: Kigo Footwear Fashion Finds Comfort
  17. 17. Figure 5-15: RSVP Lyndsey Cushioned by Foot Petals The Science of Footwear Figure 5-16: Optimus Prime inspired Nike Air Trainer "Transformers" Under Armour Gets Sophisticated Technology Offers Good Shoes and Good Health Better Health Through Earthly Footwear at Sky-High prices Spas, Fitness Experts Saw Opportunity Figure 5-17: Masai Barefoot Technology Kaya Figure 5-18: Fit Flops Sandal Figure 5-19: Z-Coil Freedom Experts Conflicted on Fitness Shoe Promises Fall Footwear Stylings: 1980s Revisited, Strong Embellishments and Colors, Aggressive Heels and Boots, Women’s Footwear Goes Retro, Aggressive Retro Designs Not New A No-Frills Backlash in the Offing?Chapter 6: Marketing Outreach Recession Time to Engage Loyal Consumers Integration Important as Media Preferences Shift Jimmy Choo Takes It Down a Notch More Strategies to Reach Price Conscious Consumers Virtual Marketing and Etail Make Most of Recession Dollars More People Cocooning and Online in Recession All the Simplicity of Email Make Use of Alternative Advertising Media Alternative Media Increasingly Important, Especially Among the Young The Puma Past Masher Behavioral Targeting in Diverse Consumer Market
  18. 18. Word-of-Mouth: Added-Value for Marketers and Consumers Footwear Clubs Breed WOM Social Networking to Play Big Part in WOM Proof That WOM Works Don’t Forget the Human Touch Product Placement Opportunities Abound Nike Active in Broadcast Placement Reliance on Sports Icons Shifting More to Celebrity What Do Kelly Ripa and Eddie Van Halen Have in Common? Appropriate and Authentic Celebrity Relationships Payless and Summer Rayne Oakes Go Green Candie’s Taps Britney to Connect with Young Consumers If the License Fits, Wear It Table 6-1: License! Global Selected Top Global Licensees in the Footwear Category, 2008 Do-Good Marketing Do-Good Marketing Part of a Whole Brand’s Image Timberland Taps Double BenefitChapter 7: The Footwear Consumer Note on Experian Simmons Market Research Bureau Consumer Data Note on BIGresearch Data Men’s Athletic Footwear Penetration Levels Highest at 20% Table 7-1: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Men’s Footwear Bought in the Past 12 Months, 2004-2009 (%) Figure 7-1: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Men’s Footwear Bought in the Past 12 Months, 2004-2009 (%) Women’s Non-Athletic Footwear Penetration Levels Highest at 23% Table 7-2: Consumer Penetration Levels for Women’s Footwear Bought in the Past 12 Months, 2004-2009 (%)
  19. 19. Figure 7-2: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Women’s Footwear Bought inthe Past 12 Months, 2004-2009 (%)Penetration When Purchasing for the Opposite Sex TypicalTable 7-3: Consumer Penetration Levels for Men’s and Women’s FootwearBought in the Past 12 Months by Member of the Opposite Sex, 2004-2009 (%)Top Footwear Segment Consumer Demographics by SexMale and Female Athletic Shoe Purchasers Characteristics Upwardly MobileTable 7-4: Demographic Characteristics of Male Athletic Shoe Purchasers, 2009(index)Table 7-5: Demographic Characteristics of Female Athletic Shoe Purchasers,2009 (index)Male and Female Non-Athletic Shoe Purchasers Characteristics Also UpwardlyMobileTable 7-6: Demographic Characteristics of Male Non-Athletic Shoe Purchasers,2009 (index)Table 7-7: Demographic Characteristics of Female Non-Athletic ShoePurchasers, 2009 (index)Male and Female Boot Purchasers Showed Dramatically DifferentCharacteristicsTable 7-8: Demographic Characteristics of Male Boot Purchasers, 2009 (index)Table 7-9: Demographic Characteristics of Female Boot Purchasers, 2009(index)Male and Female Boot Purchasers Showed Dramatically DifferentCharacteristicsTable 7-10: Demographic Characteristics of Male Slipper Purchasers, 2009(index)Table 7-11: Demographic Characteristics of Female Slipper Purchasers, 2009(index)Consumer Agreement with Select Attitudinal StatementsSurprise! Shoe Shopping a Favorite Pastime for WomenTable 7-12: Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers who ‘Agree a Lot’with the Statement: Shopping For Shoes is Favorite Pastime, 2009 (index)Brand/Designer Important to Urbanites
  20. 20. Table 7-13: Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers who Agree a Lot with the Statement: Shoe Brand or Designer is Important, 2009 (index) Fewer Purchases and Less Expensive Purchases Among the More Disenfranchised Table 7-14: Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers who Agree a Lot with the Statement: I am Buying Fewer Shoes Because of the Economy, 2009 (index) Table 7-15: Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers who Agree a Lot with the Statement: I am Buying Less Expensive Shoes Because of the Economy, 2009 (index) Function over Form Skewed Older Table 7-16 Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers who Agree a Lot with the Statement: In Buying Shoes, I Prioritize Function Over Style, 2009 (index)Footwear Consumer at Retail For Footwear, Consumers Shop Wal-Mart Most Table 7-17: Consumer Penetration Levels for Type of Retail Shopped Most Often for Shoes, by Adult Users, Men and Women, 2006-2008 (%) Specialty for Young, Department Store for Old Preference by HHI Plays Out Along Socio-Economic Lines Blacks and Hispanics Prefer to Shop at Specialty Apparel Table 7-18: Consumer Penetration Levels for Type of Retail Shopped Most Often for Shoes, by Age, Household Income and Race, 2008 (%) For Footwear, Consumers Shop Wal-Mart Most Table 7-19: Consumer Penetration Levels for Stores Shopped Most Often for Shoes, by Women, Men and Total Population, 2006-2008 (%) Age, HHI and Race Affect Retail Preference Department Stores Should Address Aging Consumer High Income Households Shop Value, but Branding Important Racial Preference Decidedly Different Table 7-20: Consumer Penetration Levels for Top 15 Stores Shopped Most Often for Shoes, by Age, Household Income and Race, 2008 (%)
  21. 21. Price, Selection, Quality and Location Top Shoe Retail Drivers Table 7-21: Top Consumer Shoe Retail Drivers for Men and Women, 2008 (%) Average Monthly Spend on Shoes in 2008: $25 Table 7-22: Average Monthly Spend on Shoes, by Adults, Men and Women, 2006-2008 (%) The Younger You are the More You Spend Wealthier More Likely to Spend on More Expensive Footwear Whites Show Lowest Average Spend Levels Table 7-23: Average Monthly Spend on Shoes, by Age, HHI and Race, 2008 (%) Consumers Likely to Spend Less Table 7-24: Consumer Response to the Question, “Over the next 90 days (July, August and September), do you plan on spending more, the same or less on footwear than you would normally spend at this time of the year?” by Adults, Women and Men, 2006-2008 (%) Table 7-25: Consumer Response to the Question, “Over the next 90 days (July, August and September), do you plan on spending more, the same or less on footwear than you would normally spend at this time of the year?” by Age, HHI and Race, 2008 (%)Chapter 8: The Athletic Footwear Consumer Note on Simmons Market Research Bureau Consumer Data Sneaker, Athletic and Sport Shoes Penetration Higher for Women at 63% Table 8-1: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Sneakers, Athletic Shoes, or Sports Shoes Bought in the Past 12 Months, by Sex and Total Population, 2009 (%) Casual Sneakers Top Among Both Men and Women Table 8-2: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Sneakers, Athletic Shoes, or Sports Shoes Product Segments Bought in the Past 12 Months, by Sex and Total Population, 2009 (%) Top Demographic Characteristics by Sneakers, Athletic Shoes, or Sports Shoes Type Casual Sneaker Purchasers More Likely Than Average to Be Young Living on East or West Coast
  22. 22. Table 8-3: Demographic Characteristics of Casual Sneaker Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Exercise and Walking Purchasers Skew Much Older, RetiredTable 8-4: Demographic Characteristics of Exercise and Walking ShoePurchasers, by Sex, 2009 (index)Jogging or Running Purchasers More Likely Than Average to be Educated,White-Collar, Family-orientedTable 8-5: Demographic Characteristics of Jogging and Running ShoePurchasers, by Sex, 2009 (index)Cross Trainers Similar to JoggersTable 8-6: Demographic Characteristics of Cross Training Shoe Purchasers, bySex, 2009 (index)Female Basketball Shoe Purchasers High Earners versus MaleTable 8-7: Demographic Characteristics of Basketball Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Tennis Shoe Purchasers Not Necessarily the Country Club StereotypeTable 8-8: Demographic Characteristics of Tennis Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Aerobic Sneaker Purchasers More Likely Than Average to be High-incomeWomenTable 8-9: Demographic Characteristics of Aerobic Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Hiking Purchasers More Likely Than Average to be Educated, West CoastTable 8-10: Demographic Characteristics of Hiking Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Nike and New Balance Only Brands with Double Digit Penetration LevelsTable 8-11: Total Consumer Penetration Levels for Sneakers, Athletic Shoes, orSports Shoes Brands Bought in the Past 12 Months, by Sex and TotalPopulation, 2009 (%)Top Demographic and Psychographic Characteristics by Selected Sneakers,Athletic Shoes, or Sports Shoes BrandNike Purchasers Demographics and Psychographics
  23. 23. Table 8-12: Demographic Characteristics of Nike Shoe Purchasers, by Sex, 2009(index)Table 8-13: Psychographic Characteristics of Nike Shoe Purchasers, 2009(index)New Balance Purchasers Demographics and PsychographicsTable 8-14: Demographic Characteristics of New Balance Shoe Purchasers, bySex, 2009 (index)Table 8-15: Psychographic Characteristics of New Balance Shoe Purchasers,2009 (index)Adidas Purchasers Demographics and PsychographicsTable 8-16: Demographic Characteristics of Adidas Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Table 8-17: Psychographic Characteristics of Adidas Shoe Purchasers, 2009(index)Reebok Purchasers Demographics and PsychographicsTable 8-18: Demographic Characteristics of Reebok Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Table 8-19: Psychographic Characteristics of Reebok Shoe Purchasers, 2009(index)Skechers Purchasers Demographics and PsychographicsTable 8-20: Demographic Characteristics of Skechers Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Table 8-21: Psychographic Characteristics of Skechers Shoe Purchasers, 2009(index)Asics Purchasers Demographics and PsychographicsTable 8-22: Demographic Characteristics of Asics Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)Table 8-23: Psychographic Characteristics of Asics Shoe Purchasers, 2009(index)Converse Purchasers Demographics and PsychographicsTable 8-24: Demographic Characteristics of Converse Shoe Purchasers, by Sex,2009 (index)
  24. 24. Table 8-25: Psychographic Characteristics of Converse Shoe Purchasers, 2009 (index) Puma Purchasers Demographics and Psychographics Table 8-26: Demographic Characteristics of Puma Shoe Purchasers, by Sex, 2009 (index) Table 8-27: Psychographic Characteristics of Puma Shoe Purchasers, 2009 (index)Available immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2091872  US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004 

×