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Frozen foods in the u.s. dinners entrees, pizza, vegetables, appetizerssnacks, and breakfast foods, 2nd edition

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  • 1. Get more info on this report!Frozen Foods in the U.S.: Dinners/Entrees, Pizza, Vegetables,Appetizers/Snacks, and Breakfast Foods, 2nd EditionApril 1, 2009To stretch their food dollars, cash-strapped consumers have been reining in theirspending and changing the way they shop. Many are trading down—going torestaurants less often for dinner, reconsidering which products really are necessities,and switching to brands and product types with higher perceived value. The good newsfor the frozen foods industry is that consumers appear to be cutting back on away-from-home meal purchases and buying more convenient frozen items to eat at home or to„brown bag” to work for lunch. Even as the nation begins to pull out of recession in late2009 or early 2010 frozen foods will continue to be buoyed by new convenience- andhealth-targeted introductions, with sales forecast to grow 25% between 2008 and 2013to reach $64.8 billion.This Packaged Facts report examines the U.S. market for frozen foods and beveragessold to consumers through the entire retail spectrum, focusing primarily on savory meal-type items and meal components. Following a comprehensive “Market Overview”chapter, separate chapters are devoted to the Center Plate,Vegetables/Appetizers/Snacks/Sides, and Breakfast Foods classifications—each ofwhich focuses on high-growth product categories and market trends and opportunities.The report provides extensive retail sales breakouts, past and future, along with athorough examination of market drivers, the competitive situation, marketer and brandshares, marketing trends and consumer trends. Special features include extensive datapresented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs. The report alsocovers topics including organic and “green” appeals, competition from fresh mealsolutions, shifts in the retail landscape and global new product trends.The report extensively documents ongoing and emerging product trends, using datafrom Datamonitor‟s Product Launch Analytics tracking service to quantify and categorizenew product introductions. Via Information Resources, Inc.‟s InfoScan Review data formass-market channels, the report tracks sales and marketer/brand shares across fivecategories (Dinners/Entrees, Pizza, Vegetables, Appetizers/Snacks, and BreakfastFoods), while relying on SPINSscan data to document sales and brand shares throughnatural supermarkets. Simmons Market Research Bureau, BIGresearch, and PackagedFacts‟ own online consumer survey data form the basis of an in-depth examination ofconsumer trends including attitudes toward frozen foods and related trends such as the
  • 2. economy and healthy eating, as well as product and brand penetration levels andpreferences.Read an excerpt from this report below.Additional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportFocus on Natural SupermarketsPrior to the 1990s, few natural food stores in the United States were large enough tomeet the supermarket definition of $2 million or more in annual sales; retailers weremostly independents operating fewer than 10 outlets. But the funky health food stores ofyesteryear have morphed into large natural foods supermarkets that are modern, brightand rival mainstream supermarkets in product range. Besides focusing on organic andnatural formulations—and on selling products from environmentally friendly producers—natural food retailers emphasize high quality. The price premiums associated with suchfoods dictate that most stores be located near households with above-average incomes.As a result, the growth of natural foods supermarkets has taken place mostly in majormetropolitan areas and affluent suburbs. Whole Foods Market, Inc. is by far the largestnatural foods supermarket chain, with approximately $8 billion in sales in the fiscal yearending September 28, 2008. The chain acquired its main rival, Wild Oats Markets, inAugust 2007.Although still outperforming the overall grocery sector, major natural supermarketretailers report that they are feeling the negative effects of the down economy. Forexample, Whole Foods, which has 271 stores, plans to reduce its number of storeopenings to 15 by September 2009 from the 25 to 30 announced in May 2008, and haslowered its sales outlook for 2009, saying it expects sales growth of 6%-10% for theyear, down from its previously stated 25%-30%. The company has also implementedcost containment measures including reductions in capital spending and the suspensionof quarterly dividends. Commenting on the moves, Whole Foods CEO John Mackey toldthe press that “Our business model has been highly successful, and we remain verybullish on our growth prospects… however, the challenging economic environmentappears to be negatively impacting our sales. This, combined with our commitment tomaintaining financial flexibility and investing prudently in our long-term growth, has ledus to take a more conservative approach to our growth and business strategy over theshort term” (company press release, August 2008).The key frozen food categories in natural foods stores are basically the same as thosein conventional supermarkets: frozen dinners/entrées, frozen pizza, frozen
  • 3. meat/poultry/seafood, frozen vegetables, frozen appetizers/snacks, frozen desserts,and frozen breakfast meals, among others. According to Rick Moller, Category Directorof Natural and ...TABLE OF CONTENTSChapter 1: Executive Summary Scope and Methodology Market Definition: Frozen Foods and Beverages Focus on Three Savory Food Classifications Report Methodology Market Size and Composition Retail Sales Total $51.8 Billion in 2008 Table 1-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Foods, 2004-2013 (in millions of dollars) IRI-Tracked Sales Approach $31.7 Billion in 2008 Center Plate Represents Half of Frozen Foods Market Figure 1-1: Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Foods and Beverages by Classification, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent) Supermarkets Claim 55% of Sales Economy Driving Consumer Purchasing Patterns A Return to Eating at Home Convenience First and Foremost Kids and Teenagers a Driving Force Competition from Fresh Prepared Foods Competitive Overview Hundreds of Competitors Niche and Natural/Organic Marketers Restaurant Names, Licensing and Diet Tie-Ins Competition from Private Label Marketing and New Product Trends More Than 600 New Products Introduced Each Year Center-Plate Classification Leads in New Products The Top Product Claims: Upscale, Quick, Natural Retail and Consumer Competitive Shifts in Retail Landscape Household Penetration of Frozen Foods by Category Table 1-2: Frozen Food Purchasing Patterns by Type, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent of U.S. households) Ore-Ida and Eggo the Most Popular Frozen Food BrandsChapter 2: Market Overview Introduction Market Definition: Frozen Foods and Beverages Focus on Three Savory Food Classifications Report Methodology
  • 4. Market Size and CompositionRetail Sales Total $51.8 Billion in 2008Table 2-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Foods, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-2: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Foods by Classification, 2004-2008 (inmillions of dollars)IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales Approach $31.7 Billion in 2008Volume Sales Down 6.0% in 2008Table 2-3: IRI-Tracked Retail Sales of Frozen Foods by Dollar and VolumeGrowth, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars and pounds)Breakfast Foods Grow Fast, Beverages DeclineCenter Plate Represents Half of Frozen Foods MarketFigure 2-1: Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Foods and Beverages byClassification, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent)Fastest-Growing Categories in IRI-Tracked ChannelsTable 2-4: Top 10 Frozen Food Categories by Percentage Growth in IRI-TrackedDollar Sales, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-5: Top 10 Frozen Food Categories by Percentage Growth in IRI-TrackedVolume Sales, 2007-2008 (in millions of pounds)Frozen Foods Make IRI‟s New Products Pacesetters ListSupermarkets Lead Retail Market with 55% of SalesFigure 2-2: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Foods by Retail Channel, 2008(percent)Seasonal Sales Vary by CategoryTable 2-6: IRI-Tracked Retail Sales of Frozen Foods by Classification andCategory, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)Market OutlookEconomy Driving Consumer Purchasing PatternsTable 2-7: Selected Food/Beverage Psychographics, February 2009 (percent ofU.S. Adults)Food Costs Are RisingFigure 2-3: Impact of Economy on Grocery Purchases by Household Income:Agreement with Statement “I Buy More Canned, Frozen or Boxed Food Items asOpposed to Fresh, Nonpreserved Food” (percent of shoppers)The Value PropositionA Return to Eating at HomeConsumers Buying More Home FreezersConvenience First and ForemostDemographic ShiftsTable 2-8: Demographic Snapshot of the U.S. Population as of July 1, 2007Health and WellnessA Delicate Balance Between Health and ConvenienceFigure 2-4: Consumer Attitudes about Healthy Foods and Time Constraints, 2008(percent of U.S. adults)Skittishness Over Food SafetyBrown-Bagging LunchEthical Issues
  • 5. Going LocalNatural/Organic Foods Going Mainstream, But Growth SlowingKids and Teenagers a Driving ForcePalate for Global Foods Is GrowingConsumers Like CustomizationIndustry Association Promotes Frozen Foods Through SchoolsNew Technologies Boost QualityTo Innovate, or Not to Innovate?Competition from the Restaurant IndustryCompetition from Fresh Prepared FoodsFigure 2-5: Supermarket Shopper Interest in Ready-to-Eat Meal Solutions, 2008(percent)Fighting the Frozen Foods StigmaProjected Market GrowthSales to Approach $65 Billion by 2013Table 2-9: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Foods and Beverages, 2008-2013 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-10: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Foods by Classification, 2008-2013 (in millions of dollars)Competitive OverviewHundreds of CompetitorsNatural/Organic MarketersRestaurant Names, Licensing and Diet Tie-InsCompetition from Private LabelMarketing and New Product TrendsMore Than 600 New Products Introduced Each YearTable 2-11: Number of U.S. Food Product Introductions: Overall vs. Frozen andRefrigerated, 1985-2008Center-Plate Classification Leads in New ProductsTable 2-12: Number of U.S. Frozen Food Product Introductions by ProductCategories, 2004-2008The Top Product Claims: Upscale, Quick, NaturalTable 2-13: Top Product Claims/Tags for U.S. Frozen Food ProductIntroductions, 2008 (number and percent)Selling ConvenienceFigure 2-6: Number of New Frozen Food Product Introductions by Selected“Convenience” Package Tags/Claims, 2007 vs. 2008Natural Going StrongFigure 2-7: Number of New Frozen Food Product Introductions by Top “Natural”Package Tags/Claims, 2007 vs. 2008Selling Health BenefitsTable 2-14: Number of New Frozen Food Product Introductions by Top “Healthy”Package Tags/Claims, 2007 vs. 2008Nestlé, Kraft Lead 2008 Product IntroductionsTable 2-15: Selected Leading U.S. Marketers of Frozen Foods Based on Stock-Keeping Unit (SKU) Introduction Levels, 2004-2008 (number)
  • 6. Packaging TrendsConsumers‟ Brand PerceptionsGlobal Marketing and New Product TrendsNestlé, Unilever Lead Frozen Food IntroductionsTrends in International New Product IntroductionsTable 2-16: Selected Leading Global Marketers of Frozen Foods Based onStock-Keeping Unit (SKU) Introduction Levels, 2004-2008 (number)Table 2-17: Top Product Claims/Tags for Food & Beverage Product Introductionsby Selected U.S. and Global Measures: 2008 (percent)Table 2-18: Top Product Claims/Tags for Food & Beverage Product Introductionsby Selected U.S. and Global Measures: Three-Year Aggregate, 2006-2008(percent)Innovative International Marketing and New Product LaunchesDistribution and RetailWarehouse vs. Direct Store DeliverySmaller Marketers Work Through BrokersCompetitive Shifts in the Retail LandscapeFocus on SupermarketsFocus on Natural SupermarketsTable 2-19: Sales of Frozen and Refrigerated Products in Natural Supermarketsby Category, March 2006 - March 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-20: Sales of Frozen and Refrigerated Products in Natural Supermarketsby Leading Marketers and Brands, March 2006 - March 2008 (in millions ofdollars)Focus on Supercenters/Mass MerchandisersFocus on Warehouse ClubsFocus on Convenience StoresTesco Forging Ahead in U.S. MarketFocus on Specialty StoresFocus on DrugstoresTrends in Other Retail Channels, at Home and AbroadConsumer OverviewNotes on Simmons Market Research Bureau Consumer DataOverview of Simmons DataTable 2-21: Frozen Food Purchasing Patterns by Type, 2004 vs. 2008 (percentof U.S. households)Ore-Ida and Eggo the Most Popular Frozen Food BrandsTable 2-22: Top 10 Frozen Foods Products by Usage Rates, 2008 (percent ofU.S. adults)Table 2-23: Usage Rates for Selected Frozen Foods Types and Brands, 2008(percent of U.S. adults)Demographics of Users Vary by Product CategoryConsumer Attitudes Toward Frozen FoodsTable 2-24: Top Demographic Indicators for Agreement with Statement: I OftenEat Frozen Dinners, 2008 (indices)
  • 7. Table 2-25: Top Demographic Indicators for Agreement with Statement: Easy to Prepare Foods are My Favorite, 2008 (indices) Table 2-26: Top Demographic Indicators for Agreement with Statement: Frozen Dinners Have Little Nutritional Value, 2008 (indices) Frozen Breakfast Entrées are the Highest Indexing Category Among Prime Frozen Food Consumers Figure 2-27: Leading Frozen Foods Products by Indexes of Prime Frozen Food Consumers, 2008 (indices) Walmart Is Top Channel for Frozen Foods Table 2-28: Frozen Food Chain Retail Patterns, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults) Table 2-29: Frozen Food Chain Retail Patterns: By Age Bracket, 2008 (index and percent of U.S. adults) Table 2-30: Frozen Food Expenditure Patterns, 2008 (percent of .S. adults) Table 2-31: Frozen Food Expenditure Patterns: By Age Bracket, 2008 (index and percent of U.S. adults) Table 2-32: Frozen Food Expenditure Patterns: By Retail Channel Most Often Shopped, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults) Frozen Food Age 2008 Consumer StudyChapter 3: Center-Plate Frozen Foods Market Trends Market Definition: Main Courses A $26 Billion Market Table 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Center-Plate Foods, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars) Single-Serve Dinners/Entrées Comprise Largest Category Table 3-2: Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Center-Plate Foods by Product Category, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent) Supermarket Retail Share 55% Figure 3-1: Share of Frozen Center-Plate Foods by Retail Channel, 2008 (percent) Seasonal Sales Market Outlook Convenience and Value Are Prime Motivators No-Mess Cooking, Easy Clean-Up Consumers Stocking Up Projected Market Growth Frozen Center-Plate Foods to Approach $33 Billion by 2013 Table 3-3: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Center-Plate Foods, 2008-2013 (in millions of dollars) Competitive Overview More than 300 Marketers Market Leaders Important Niche Marketers Marketers of Mexican-Style Specialties Marketers of Asian and Other International Specialties Natural and Vegetarian Marketers
  • 8. Some Marketers Focus on Non-Supermarket ChannelsPrivate Label Big in Some Categories, Small in OthersMarketing and New Product TrendsNew Products ProliferateTable 3-4: Number of U.S. Frozen Food Product Introductions in Center-PlateCategories, 2004-2008The ConsumerFrozen Pizza Enjoys Deepest Household PenetrationFigure 3-2: Frozen Center-Plate Foods Purchasing Patterns by Type, 2004 vs.2008 (percent of U.S. households)Focus on Dinners/EntréesCompetitive OverviewFrozen Dinners/Entrées LeadersRegional and Niche PlayersEthnic PlayersNatural and Organic MarketersMarketer and Brand SharesMethodologySingle-Serve Dinners/Entrées the Largest SubcategoryFigure 3-3: Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Dinners/EntréesCategory by Type, 2008 (percent)Nestlé and ConAgra Control 61% of Frozen Dinners/Entrées SalesTable 3-5: Marketer Share of Total Frozen Dinners/Entrées by IRI-Tracked DollarSales, 2008 (percent)Nestlé Leads Single-Serve Dinners/EntréesTable 3-6: Top Marketers of Frozen Single-Serve Dinners by IRI-Tracked Salesand Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars)Nestlé Controls Over Half of Hand-Held Non-Breakfast Entrées MarketTable 3-7: Top Marketers of Frozen Hand-Held Non-Breakfast Entrées by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars)Nestlé Also on Top in Frozen Multi-Serve Dinners/EntréesTable 3-8: Top Marketers of Frozen Multi-Serve Dinners/Entrées by IRI-TrackedSales and Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars)Marketing and New Product TrendsFrozen Dinners/Entrées Require Constant TweakingValue vs. Premium Positioning StrategiesRestaurant Names and Restaurant Quality Meals at HomeHomemade-Style FoodsMarketing Health BenefitsEthnic Foods Getting a Healthy UpdateNatural and Organic Options ProliferatingNatural Foods for Kids, TooContessa Is Going GreenSteaming Hot MealsHand-Held Entrées: Panini and MoreMeals for Two—Or More
  • 9. The ConsumerMore than Half of U.S. Households Use Frozen DinnersBanquet, Swanson the Most Popular Frozen Dinner BrandsTable 3-9: Frozen Dinners Purchasing Patterns by Brand, 2004 vs. 2008 (percentof U.S. households)Stouffer‟s and Banquet the Favorite Frozen EntréesTable 3-10: Frozen Entrées Purchasing Patterns by Brand, 2004 vs. 2008(percent of U.S. households)Hot Pockets the Most Popular Brand of Frozen Hand-Held EntréesTable 3-11: Frozen Hand-Held Entrées Purchasing Patterns by Brand, 2004 vs.2008 (percent of U.S. households)Demographics of Frozen Dinner Purchasers Differ by BrandTable 3-12: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for FrozenDinners, 2008 (U.S. households)Frozen Entrée Consumer ProfilesTable 3-13: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for FrozenEntrées, 2008 (U.S. households)Frozen Hand-Held Entrées Hold Similar DrawsTable 3-14: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for FrozenHand-Held Non-Breakfast Entrées, 2008 (U.S. households)Focus on Frozen PizzaCompetitive OverviewFrozen Pizza LeadersRegional Pizza Marketers Serve Regional TastesMidwest the Core Market for Frozen PizzaFigure 3-4: Likelihood of Pizza Usage by Region, 2008 (index)Marketer and Brand SharesMethodologyKraft Leads Frozen Pizza with Multiple Brands and 39% ShareTable 3-15: Marketer Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Pizza, 2008(percent)Table 3-16: Top Marketers of Frozen Pizza by IRI-Tracked Sales and MarketShare, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars)Marketing and New Product TrendsPlenty of Room to GrowUpscale vs. Value Positioning StrategiesEven More Like Restaurant StylePizza That‟s Good for YouSingle-Serve PizzasJust for KidsThe ConsumerTwo Out of Three Homes Use Frozen PizzaTable 3-17: Frozen Pizza Purchasing Patterns by Brand, 2004 vs. 2008 (percentof U.S. households)Pizza a Youth- and Family-Oriented Product
  • 10. Table 3-18: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for Frozen Pizza, 2008 (U.S. households)Chapter 4: Frozen Vegetables, Appetizers/Snacks and Sides Market Trends Market Definition: Frozen Vegetables, Appetizers/Snacks and Sides Market Approaching $8.8 Billion Table 4-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Vegetables, Appetizers/Snacks and Sides, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars) Frozen Plain Vegetables Account for 34% of Retail Sales Table 4-2: Share of IRI-Tracked Retail Dollar Sales of Frozen Vegetables, Appetizers/Snacks and Sides by Product Category, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent) Supermarkets Lead Retail Market with 70% of Sales Figure 4-1: Share of Frozen Vegetables, Appetizers/Snacks and Sides by Retail Channel, 2008 (percent) Seasons Dramatically Impact Sales Sales to Reach $12 Billion by 2013 Table 4-3: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Vegetables, Appetizers/Snacks and Sides, 2008-2013 (in millions of dollars) New Product Counts Table 4-4: Number of U.S. Frozen Food Product Introductions in Frozen Vegetable, Appetizer/Snack, and Sides Categories, 2004-2008 Focus on Frozen Vegetables Market Outlook Frozen Vegetables Suddenly a Hot Category Frozen Vegetables Economically a Good Value Consumers View Veggies as Healthy—But Don‟t Eat Enough Consumers Seek Easy Cooking and Clean-Up Challenge from Fresh Counterparts Competitive Overview A Short List of Market Leaders Marketer and Brand Shares Methodology Private Label Almost 43% of Frozen Vegetable Sales Table 4-5: Top Marketers of Frozen Plain Vegetables by IRITracked Sales and Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars) Ore-Ida Rings Up More than Half of Frozen Potato Sales Table 4-6: Top Marketers of Frozen Potatoes by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars) Marketing and New Product Trends All Steamed Up Steam Cooking Migrating to Other Product Categories Functional Vegetables Single-Serve Veggies Getting Kids to Eat their Veggies A New Bean Encouraging Creative Cooking
  • 11. Frozen Fresh HerbsPotatoes Move Beyond French FriesThe ConsumerFour in Five Households Use Frozen VegetablesTable 4-7: Frozen Vegetables Purchasing Patterns by Type, 2004 vs. 2008(percent of U.S. households)Few Outstanding Demographic IndicatorsTable 4-8: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for FrozenVegetables, 2008 (U.S. households)Three out of Five Households Use Frozen PotatoesTable 4-9: Frozen Potatoes Purchasing Patterns by Type, 2004 vs. 2008(percent of U.S. households)Kids, Large Households Indicated for Frozen PotatoesTable 4-10: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for FrozenPotatoes, 2008 (U.S. households)Focus on Frozen Appetizers/SnacksMarket OutlookFrozen Appetizers/Snacks Suit Multiple Eating OccasionsMeals Blurring, Snacks RisingPerfect for Kids and TeensRestaurants Exert a Powerful InfluenceEthnic-Style Appetizers/Snacks in High DemandHealth and Wellness Meet SnacksCompetitive OverviewOnly Two National Market LeadersMexican, Asian and Other Ethnic SpecialtiesSome Marketers Focus on Non-Supermarket ChannelsMarketer and Brand SharesMethodologyHeinz Leads Frozen Appetizers/Snacks with Multiple BrandsTable 4-11: Top Marketers of Frozen Appetizers/Snacks by IRI-Tracked Salesand Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars)Marketing and New Product TrendsNew Lines from Established and New PlayersNew StuffHealthier Snacking FoodsIntroducing EmpanadasAppetizers with SoulWegmans Adds Elegant Private-Label Hors d‟OeuvresFrozen Bread RisingThe ConsumerAlmost Half of Households Use Frozen Appetizers/SnacksFigure 4-2: Favorite Brands of Frozen Hot Snacks, 2008 (percent of U.S.households)Households with Kids a Key Market
  • 12. Table 4-12: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for Frozen Appetizers/Snacks, 2008 (U.S. households)Chapter 5: Frozen Breakfast Foods Market Trends Market Definition: Frozen Breakfast Foods A $2.2 Billion Market Table 5-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Breakfast Foods, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars) Waffles the Largest Category; Muffins Grow Fastest Table 5-2: IRI-Tracked Retail Sales of Frozen Breakfast Foods by Product Category, 2004 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars) Waffles Slip to 37% Share of Frozen Breakfast Foods Table 5-3: Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Breakfast Foods by Product Category, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent) Supermarkets Lead But Have Declined in Share Figure 5-1: Share of Frozen Breakfast Food Sales by Retail Channel, 2008 (percent) Market Outlook The Most Important Meal Consumers Skip Convenience Is Primary Market Driver Different Needs for Weekdays, Weekends Not Just for Breakfast Kid-Targeted Foods a Big Part of the Action Competition from Other Breakfast Foods and Fast Foods Product Innovation a Challenge Projected Market Growth Frozen Breakfast Foods Will Approach $3.1 Billion by 2013 Table 5-4: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Breakfast Foods, 2008-2013 (in millions of dollars) Competitive Overview Short List of Leading Marketers Licensing an Important Market Component Marketers Buy Ideas from Outside Corporate Structure Marketer and Brand Shares Methodology Kellogg Claims One-Third of Frozen Breakfast Foods Market Table 5-5: Marketer Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Breakfast Foods, 2008 (percent) Kellogg Dominates Frozen Waffles with a 73% Market Share Table 5-6: Top Marketers of Frozen Waffles by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars) Sara Lee Leads Frozen Hand-Held Breakfast Category Table 5-7: Top Marketers of Frozen Hand-Held Breakfast Entrées by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars) Sara Lee and Pinnacle on Top in Frozen Breakfast Meals
  • 13. Table 5-8: Top Marketers of Frozen Breakfast Meals/Entrées by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2007-2008 (in millions of dollars) Marketing and New Product Trends Part of a Larger Category Breakfast Fast… … and On-the-Go Better-for-You Breakfasts Hot Oatmeal from the Freezer Products with a New Twist Just for Kids The Consumer More than Half of U.S. Households Use Frozen Waffles/Pancakes/French Toast One out of Four Households Use Frozen Breakfast Sandwiches/Entrées 9% Use Frozen Bagels Table 5-9: Frozen Breakfast Foods Purchasing Patterns by Type, 2004 vs. 2008 (percent of U.S. households) Frozen Waffles/Pancakes/French Toast Draw Kids, Large Families, Northeasterners Table 5-10: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for Frozen Waffles/Pancakes/French Toast, 2008 (U.S. households) African Americans, Families with Teens Choose Frozen Breakfast Entrées/Sandwiches Table 5-11: Selected High-Indexing Demographics by Brand Line for Frozen Breakfast Entrées/Sandwiches, 2008 (U.S. households)Available immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2204361US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004