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    Foodies in the u.s. foodie cooks Foodies in the u.s. foodie cooks Document Transcript

    • Get more info on this report!Foodies in the U.S.: Foodie CooksJanuary 1, 2009For food aficionados, food offers much more than nourishment. It offers a frameworkthrough which they can build relationships, make new friends, explore the world andeven examine which behaviors are ethical. They use food to define who they are ingreater society. The term foodie, which first appeared in the early 1980s, has enteredthe English language to describe this new type of food lover and a surrounding newculture of food. Foodies are distinct from gourmets in that their interests tend to be morewide ranging. Foodies enjoy high-end gourmet food, to be sure, but they also seek outhole-in-the-wall BBQ shacks, taco trucks and Chinatown markets. Foodies enjoy thethrill of the hunt and being the first to catch on to new food trends, and food outletsconsidered “authentic” carry the most prestige in the foodie world. As authenticityfrequently equates to a degree of separation from big food conglomerates andcorporate marketing campaigns, foodies can be an elusive target for marketers. At thesame time, foodies are a desirable demographic, as they are avid, tech-savvyconsumers who embrace all sorts of trends, not just those that are food-related, andwho introduce these trends to their communities and peers.Through an analysis of selected lifestyle statements in Simmons Market ResearchBureau’s national consumer survey, Packaged Facts has determined that 14% of U.S.adults—or 31 million—are foodies. Drawing on cross-tabulated Simmons data, thisreport examines foodies’ demographic characteristics in depth while also discussingfoodies’ values and consumer habits. Following a thorough trend overview chapter, thereport profiles the foodie cohort known as foodie cooks, pinpointing their uniquecharacteristics across areas including demographics and attitudes, mediaresponsiveness, shopping habits and restaurant behavior.Read an excerpt from this report below.Report MethodologyThe information in Foodies is based on primary and secondary research. Primaryresearch entails in-depth interviews with consultants and industry insiders to obtaininformation on food trends and the people that drive them. Secondary research entaileddata gathering from relevant sources, including consumer and industry publications,
    • newspapers, government reports and company literature. Dozens of charts and tablesfrom diverse sources are included. Consumer demographics are derived from SimmonsMarket Research Bureau data.What You’ll Get in This ReportThis report helps companies understand what motivates foodies and how to appeal tothem, even in difficult economic times. It makes important predictions andrecommendations regarding the future of this market. Plus, you’ll benefit from extensivedata, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.How You’ll Benefit from This ReportIf your company is involved in the grocery or restaurant industry or launches new foodproducts regularly, you will find this report invaluable. Because foodies also like to leadthe way in other consumer areas—from shopping to fashion, nutrition matters to “green”pursuits—marketers of non-food products will also benefit from learning how to reachthis trend-setting demographic.This report will help: Marketing managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for food products Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for their businesses Advertising agencies working with clients in the foodservice industries to help their products find an eager audience Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships. Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.Additional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportYouth SkewBy age, foodie cooks are distributed relatively evenly throughout the U.S. adultpopulation. One notable exception is that foodie cooks are 28% more likely than U.S.
    • adults on average to be age 25-34 (index of 128), a group that thus represents a keydemographic for marketers. In fact, close to one-tenth (8.4%) of all American adults inthis age group are foodie cooks, while slightly over half of foodie cooks (52%) are age44 or under. On the other hand, adults age 65 and older are 13% less likely to be foodiecooks (index of 87). [Figure 3-2, Table 3-1]Foodie Cooks Embrace Healthy Food Trends, But Are Also Price-ConsciousFood marketers should also be glad to know that foodie cooks are an eager audiencefor a variety of new food products and trends, especially those related to health anddieting. They are 381% more likely than U.S. adults on average to agree a lot that theyare usually quick to try new nutritional products (index of 481), 359% more likely to liketo try new drinks (index of 459), 282% more likely to usually be the first to try new healthfoods (index of 382) and 180% more likely to try any new diet (index of 280).Foodie cooks are, in fact, more concerned with health and dieting matters than U.S.adults on average and foodies overall. Bearing this out, foodie cooks disproportionatelyreport that they usually only snack on healthy foods (index of 375), normally count thecalories in the foods they eat (index of 282), like to know about ingredients beforebuying food (index of 268), think of the calories in what they eat (index of 251), activelyseek info about nutrition and diet (index of 244), are trying lose weight by dieting most ofthe time (index of 229), feel guilty when eating fattening food (index of 228) andconsider their diets to be very healthy (index of 226). [Figure 3-8, Table 3-3]TABLE OF CONTENTSChapter 1: Executive Summary Scope and Methodology Scope of Report Five Foodie Cohorts Report Methodology Market Overview The New Culture of Food Defining Foodie An American Phenomenon Foodie Character and Values Foodie-ism Often a Key Part of Self-Identity Foodies May Resist Foodie Classification 31.2 Million U.S. Adults Are Foodies Figure 1-1: Foodies and Foodie Cohorts as a Percentage of U.S. Adults, 2008 (percent) Foodiehood Peaks in Pre-Middle Age Brackets Skew to Pacific and Northeast Regions, Downtown Areas Educated But Not Necessarily Rich
    • Consumers with an Attitude Influencers and Influenced High Media and Advertising Awareness Traveling to Taste Foodies Highly Receptive to Food Marketing Foodies as Informed Health Consumers Foodie Eco-Consciousness Foodie Opportunities in All Dayparts Figure 1-2: Relative Importance of Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Among Foodies, 2008 (index) Eating In: No Time to Scrimp Food Shopping Skews to Fresh Formats The Cheaper Side of Whole Foods Food and Beverage Purchasing Patterns The Resurgence of Farmers’ Markets Organic v. Local Foodies Push Fast Food in Healthier Directions Foodies Embrace Social Aspects of Food Foodies and the Economic DownturnChapter 2: Market Overview Introduction The New Culture of Food Defining Foodie An American Phenomenon Foodie Character and Values Foodie-ism Often a Key Part of Self-Identity Foodies May Resist Foodie Classification 31.2 Million U.S. Adults Are Foodies Five Foodie Cohorts 10% of Adults Are Foreign/Spicy Foodies 9% Are Restaurant Foodies 7% Are Foodie Cooks Figure 2-1: Foodies and Foodie Cohorts as a Percentage of U.S. Adults, 2008 (percent) 5% Are Gourmet Foodies Figure 2-2: Foodies and Foodie Cohorts by Number of U.S. Adults, 2008 (in thousands) 4% Are Organic/Natural Foodies Figure 2-3: Foodie Cohorts as a Percentage of All Foodies, 2008 Overlap Between Foodie Cohorts Table 2-1: Overlap Between Foodie Cohorts, 2008 (percent) Foodies and the Mapping of Food Trends Foodie Demographics Foodiehood Peaks in Pre-Middle Age Brackets Figure 2-4: Age Distribution Among Foodies, 2008 (index) A Female Skew
    • Figure 2-5: Foodie Gender Breakout, 2008 (percent)Hispanics Index at 128 as FoodiesFigure 2-6: Foodie Ethnic/Racial Demographics, 2008 (index)U.S. Racial/Ethnic TrendsSkew to Pacific and Northeast Regions, Downtown AreasFigure 2-7: Foodie Patterns by Region of Residence, 2008 (index)Figure 2-8: Foodie Patterns by Type of Residence, 2008 (index)Educated But Not Necessarily RichFoodies and the Economic DownturnFigure 2-9: U.S. Grocery Industry Sales Growth, 2001-2007 (percent)Will Foodies Cut Back?Table 2-2: Foodie Demographics, 2008 (percentages, number and index for U.S.adults)Foodie Psychographics and Consumer TraitsConsumers with an AttitudeEnthralled with the NewFigure 2-10: Foodie Attitudes About Experimentation, 2008 (index)An Adventuresome Self-ImageFigure 2-11: Foodie Self-Image About Adventure, 2008 (index)Foodies Wear PradaFigure 2-12: Foodie Attitudes About Fashion, 2008 (index)Influencers and InfluencedFigure 2-13: Foodie Attitudes About Trendsetting, 2008 (index)Figure 2-14: Foodies Attitudes About Outside Opinions and Validation, 2008(index)High Media and Advertising AwarenessFoodies Gravitate to the Web, BlogsFigure 2-15: Popular Foodie BlogsFigure 2-16: Foodie Computer Attitudes and Usage Levels, 2008 (index)Bricks-and-Mortar Patterns Reflect High-Style, High-Tech TastesFoodies Are Active as Direct ShoppersFoodies Highly Receptive to Food MarketingImpulse Spending Over Coupon CuttingFigure 2-17: Foodie Attitudes About Spending, 2008 (index)Foodies as Informed Health ConsumersFoodie Eco-ConsciousnessFigure 2-18: Environmental Attitudes of Foodies, 2008 (index)Vegetarians, the Food Chain, and the EnvironmentTraveling to TasteTable 2-3: Selected Psychographics: Adults Overall vs. Foodies, 2008 (percentof U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodie adults)Table 2-4: Personal Computer Use Patterns: Adults Overall vs. Foodies, 2008(percent of U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodie adults)Table 2-5: Retail Shopping Patterns: Adults Overall vs. Foodies, 2008 (percent ofU.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodie adults)
    • Table 2-6: Internet, Mail, or Phone Order Shopping Patterns: Adults Overall vs.Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodieadults)Table 2-7: Food Retail Shopping & Spending Patterns: Adults Overall vs.Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodieadults)Foodies and the Food IndustryFoodie Opportunities in All DaypartsFigure 2-19: Relative Importance of Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner AmongFoodies, 2008 (index)Eating In: No Time to ScrimpFood Shopping Skews to Fresh FormatsThe Cheaper Side of Whole FoodsFood and Beverage Purchasing PatternsMalls Make a Play for GourmetsThe Resurgence of Farmers’ MarketsFigure 2-20: Number of Operating Farmers Markets, 1994-2008Rise of Local Food MovementAn Organic Plateau?Figure 2-21: U.S. Organic Food Sales, 2005-2008 (in millions of dollars)Foodies and Foodservice ChainsFoodies Push Fast Food in Healthier DirectionsFoodies Embrace Social Aspects of FoodCommunal DiningSupper ClubsTable 2-8: Household Use of Packaged Foods by Type of Product: Adults Overallvs. Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodieadults)Table 2-9: Household Use of Beverage Products by Type: Adults Overall vs.Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodieadults)Table 2-10: Household Purchasing Patterns for Packaged Foods for SelectedBrands: Adults Overall vs. Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall andpercent and index for foodie adults)Table 2-11: Household Use of Non-Alcoholic Beverage Products for SelectedBrands: Adults Overall vs. Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall andpercent and index for foodie adults)Table 2-12: Use of Selected Alcoholic Beverage Brands: Adults Overall vs.Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodieadults)Table 2-13: Use of Family Restaurant and Fast Food Chains: Adults Overall vs.Foodies, 2008 (percent of U.S. adults overall and percent and index for foodieadults)Foodie KidsHousehold Expenditures on Kids’ Food
    • Table 2-14: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Food for 3- to 11-Year- Olds by Age Group, 2007 (number and dollars) A New Foodie Generation Organic Baby Food on a Healthy Track Nurturing Foodie Kids and Teens Trends for Kids Trends for TeensChapter 3: Foodie Cooks Demographic and Lifestyle Overview Market Definition Figure 3-1: Overlap Between Foodie Cooks and Other Foodie Cohorts (percent) A Youth Skew Figure 3-2: Indexes by Age Bracket: Foodie Cooks vs. Foodies Overall, 2008 Women Up Front Figure 3-3: Gender Breakouts: Foodie Cooks vs. Foodies Overall, 2008 (percent) Racial/Ethnic Minorities Also Over-Represented Figure 3-4: Indexes by Race/Ethnicity: Foodie Cooks vs. Foodies Overall, 2008 Pacific and Northeast Are Top Regions Foodie Cooks Less Educated Than Foodies Overall Figure 3-5: Indexes by Highest Level of Educational Attainment: Foodie Cooks vs. Foodies Overall, 2008 Earnings Also Moderately Lower Figure 3-6: Indexes by Household Income: Foodie Cooks vs. Foodies Overall, 2008 Opinionated, Peer-Motivated Consumers Figure 3-7: Indexes for Shopping and Style Psychographics: Foodie Cooks vs. Foodies Overall, 2008 Gourmet, Organic/Natural Foods Hold Strong Appeal Foodie Cooks Embrace Healthy Food Trends, But Are Also Price- Conscious Figure 3-8: Indexes for Health and Dieting Psychographics: Foodie Cooks vs. Foodies Overall, 2008 Foodie Cooks Don’t Always Cook Media and Computer Habits Big Spenders in Grocery Stores Above Average Ordering by Phone or Mail Favored Food Products, Brands on the Fancy Side Restaurant Usage Patterns The Foodie Cook Landscape Supermarket Trends Reflect Rising Food Costs, Economic Slump Fresh Foods a Sales-Driving Grocery Store Trend Many Foodie Cooks “Going Local” Figure 3-9: U.S. Retail Sales of Locally Grown Foods: 2002, 2007 and 2011 (in billions of dollars) Farmers Markets Attract Foodie Cooks Meal Assembly Kitchens Figure 3-10: Growth in Number of Meal Assembly Kitchens, 2002- 2007
    • Table 3-1: Foodie Cook Demographics, 2008 (percentages, number and index for U.S. adults) Table 3-2: Selected General Psychographics: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-3: Selected Food- and Nutrition-Related Psychographics: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-4: Personal Computer Use Patterns: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-5: Retail Shopping Patterns: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-6: Internet, Mail, or Phone Order Shopping Patterns: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-7: Food Retail Shopping & Spending Patterns: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-8: Household Use of Packaged Foods by Type of Product: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-9: Household Purchasing Patterns for Packaged Foods for Selected Brands: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks) Table 3-10: Use of Family Restaurant & Fast Food Chains: Foodies Overall vs. Foodie Cooks, 2008 (percent and index for foodies overall vs. foodie cooks)Available immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2088310US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004