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Biofuels Global Market: Opportunities, Emerging Technologies and Production
 

Biofuels Global Market: Opportunities, Emerging Technologies and Production

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    Biofuels Global Market: Opportunities, Emerging Technologies and Production Biofuels Global Market: Opportunities, Emerging Technologies and Production Document Transcript

    • Get more info on this report!Biofuels Global Market: Opportunities, Emerging Technologies andProductionOctober 1, 2009SBI estimates that the global market value for liquid biofuel and bioenergymanufacturing is $102.5 billion ($U.S.) in 2009 and expects it to reach nearly $170.4billion by 2014. The U.S. is the leading producer and consumer of bio-based renewableenergy, including automotive fuel and electricity. The dollar value of U.S.-produced bio-energy manufacturing initiatives is currently $48.7 billion and will grow to reach $103.3billion in 2014, representing a five-year CAGR rate of 16.2%. The U.S. share of thebiofuel and bioenergy manufacturing industry is nearly 48% of the world’s total and willgrow to nearly 61% by 2014. Brazil will maintain share of second place with a marketvalue of $46.3 billion by 2014, a 4.2% CAGR growth from $37.7 billion. The fastestgrowing countries for bio-based energy manufacturing include China and India, whichwill grow their market values through 2014, although their overall market share willflatten. This report is the most comprehensive treatment of the biofuels marketavailable. Worldwide data is provided on biorefineries, conversion and separationtechnologies, manufacturing, research and development, organic biofuels, consumption,capacity, components and competition.This report delves into the global efforts to develop technologies that improve therefining processes associated with many different types of biofuels and its growingconsumption among nations throughout the next few decades.Biofuel is expected to become a major renewable resource to produce fuel, electricity,heat, and other sources of power. To compete with other energy types will requiredevelopment and implementation of an enhanced biorefinery process that minimizes itsimpact on local environments. Developing sustainable fractionation and separationtechnologies will be a key factor for the success of refining biomasses into renewableenergy.Biorefinery technology differs from traditional oil based refinery technology because itwill be mainly water-based. Today’s biofuels involve either ethanol or diesel, with theformer accounting for roughly 90 percent of the market. Brazil, the United States, and
    • China are the greatest producers. More than half of the world’s bioethanol is generatedfrom sugar cane; the rest comes mainly from corn. Biodiesel is mostly derived fromrapeseed and sunflower.Additional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportShipments of Organic Biomass FeedstocksBiofuels trade accounts for upwards of 15% of total global production. Ethanol tradealone represents nearly 80% of global production and faces high tariffs in manycountries. The U.S. accounts for approximately 48% (nearly 10 billion gallons) of globalbiofuel production, with the EU and Brazil accounting for the remainder. Brazil exportsabout 950 million gallons of ethanol, or about half of world exports. In the U.S., biofuelimports comprise a small share of domestic consumption since the tariff costs ofimporting ethanol typically exceed domestic ethanol prices.Since the U.S. is the world’s leading producer and exporter of corn, corn-based ethanolmanufactured outside of the U.S. will not likely become a significant competitor to U.S.corn ethanol. SBI expects the U.S. export market for corn, as well as other feedstockcomponents of ethanol and biodiesel, to continue to decline through 2014. U.S. exportsof biomass manufacturing components have declined since 2004 at a CAGR rate of3.5% to reach $12.2 billion. A more substantial threat to the U.S. corn-ethanol exportmarket will be how rapidly other nations develop their cellulosic biofuel conversiontechnologies, maximize those conversion efficiencies and create a viable and profitableexport market. Biofuel legislation in a biofuel exporting country may limit its totalpotential for exports, according to Brian Jennings of the American Coalition for EthanolA closer look at feedstocks used for bio-based energy refining shows sharp declines inthe U.S. export value for organic resources other than corn. Japan remains the largestconsumer of U.S. produced wheat, for example, but its trade value has declined by 7%from $525.8 million in 2004 to $489.6 million in 2009. Overall U.S. exports of wheathave dipped 38.1% since 2004 to reach $3.2 billion in 2009.In the News U.S. Leads World Biomass Production and Consumption
    • New York, September 14, 2009 - Premier energy market research publisher SBI hasjust released a new report:Global Biofuels Market: Opportunities, EmergingTechnologies and Production. Offering the most current and comprehensivetreatment of the biofuels market available, SBI delves into the global efforts to developtechnologies that improve the refining processes associated with many different types ofbiofuels and its growing consumption among nations throughout the next few decades.Worldwide data is provided on biorefineries, conversion and separation technologies,manufacturing, research and development, organic biofuels, capacity, components andcompetition.Biomass is poised to become a significant source for renewable energy productionduring the next decade with the U.S. leading the growing global commitment to biofueluse. As the leading producer and consumer of bio-based renewable energy, the U.S. isdriving biomass activity levels within its military, Department of Energy (DOE) and theU.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).Biomass currently comprises 10% of total renewable energy generation in the U.S. SBIforecasts the market will claim a 12.5% share by 2014, attributing the increase ingeneration to accelerated efforts among bioenergy companies to generate electricityand liquid biofuels more efficiently and economically. Global Biofuels Market:Opportunities, Emerging Technologies and Production examines the industrycomponents, competitors, growth and innovations through expert primary research andanalysis."Rapid growth of organic biomass manufacturing, especially corn and non-food sourcessuch as forestry products and tallow, will be evident through 2014" says Shelley Carr,publisher of SBI. SBI projects the $103 billion biofuels market will exceed $170 billion by2014, with the fastest growth for bio-based energy manufacturing in regions such asChina and India.Outside the U.S., nations worldwide are investing in the research and development oftechnologies and processes that convert biomass into electricity-generating resourcesand usable liquid biofuels, including ethanol and biodiesel. Developing innovative andsustainable biomass separation technologies that minimize impact on localenvironments and reduce the threat to diminished food supply and other naturalresources will become a key factor for the long-term industrial and commercial successof the biofuels industry.About SBISBI (Specialists in Business Information) publishes research reports in the industrial,energy, building/construction, automotive/transportation and packaging markets. SBIalso offers a full range of custom research services.Additional Materials
    • Global Biofuels MarketGlobal Biofuels Market: Opportunities, Emerging Technologies and Production Through2014, SBI projects the U.S. to lead the world in global production of biobased energyactivity, growing at a five-year CAGR rate of 13%. Ethanol production provides asubstantial contribution to the American economy.Table of ContentsSBI estimates that the global market value for liquid biofuel and bioenergymanufacturing is $102.5 billion ($U.S.) in 2009 and expects it to reach nearly $170.4billion by 2014. The U.S. is the leading producer and consumer of bio-based renewableenergy, including automotive fuel and electricity. The dollar value of U.S.-produced bio-energy manufacturing initiatives is currently $48.7 billion and will grow to reach $103.3billion in 2014, representing a five-year CAGR rate of 16.2%. The U.S. share of thebiofuel and bioenergy manufacturing industry is nearly 48% of the world’s total and willgrow to nearly 61% by 2014. Brazil will maintain share of second place with a marketvalue of $46.3 billion by 2014, a 4.2% CAGR growth from $37.7 billion. The fastestgrowing countries for bio-based energy manufacturing include China and India, whichwill grow their market values through 2014, although their overall market share willflatten. This report is the most comprehensive treatment of the biofuels marketavailable. Worldwide data is provided on biorefineries, conversion and separationtechnologies, manufacturing, research and development, organic biofuels, consumption,capacity, components and competition.This report delves into the global efforts to develop technologies that improve therefining processes associated with many different types of biofuels and its growingconsumption among nations throughout the next few decades.Biofuel is expected to become a major renewable resource to produce fuel, electricity,heat, and other sources of power. To compete with other energy types will requiredevelopment and implementation of an enhanced biorefinery process that minimizes itsimpact on local environments. Developing sustainable fractionation and separationtechnologies will be a key factor for the success of refining biomasses into renewableenergy.Biorefinery technology differs from traditional oil based refinery technology because itwill be mainly water-based. Today’s biofuels involve either ethanol or diesel, with theformer accounting for roughly 90 percent of the market. Brazil, the United States, andChina are the greatest producers. More than half of the world’s bioethanol is generatedfrom sugar cane; the rest comes mainly from corn. Biodiesel is mostly derived fromrapeseed and sunflower.
    • Chapter 1: Executive Summary Outlook for Biofuel Consumption Figure 1-1: Global Share of Energy Consumption by Source, 2009 vs. 2014 Table 1-1: Bioenergy Supply, by Region, 2006, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) External Factors Affect Growth of Biofuels Food Prices Fuel Biomass Debate United States Remains Hotbed of Biomass Activity Biofuel Technology Research Global Market Values Table 1-2: Global Market Values of Biofuel and Bioenergy (Organic and Technology) Manufacturing, by Country, 2009 and 2014 (in $ millions) Table 1-3: U.S. Market Value of Biomass Manufacturing, Organic and Technology, 2006 to 2009 Shipments of Organic Biomass Feedstocks Table 1-4: U.S. Export Value of Wheat, by Country, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Imports of Organic Biomass U.S. Shipments of Biomass Conversion Technology Components Table 1-5: U.S. Shipment Value of Biomass Conversion Technology Components, 2004 to 2009 (in $ millions) Table 1-6: U.S. Market Value of Biomass Conversion Technology Components, 2004 to 2009 (in $ millions) U.S. Backs Biofuel Innovations Federal Funding Fuels Innovation Innovations in Biorefineries Innovations in Biofuel Processing Biofuel Energy Policy Fuels Debate Biofuel’s Effect on Food Prices Biofuels Lobbying Efforts Global Policies toward Biofuels Market Value Forecast Through 2014 Figure 1-2: Share of Global Market Value for Biofuel and Bioenergy Manufacturing by Country, 2009 and 2014Chapter 2: Introduction and Overview Report Scope Methodology Terminology Table 2-1: Biomass Power TechnologiesFuture Biomass Conversion Technologies Table 2-2: Future U.S. Biomass Conversion Technology Research Projects First- and Second-Generation Liquid Biofuels Ethanol Production Processes Table 2-3: Energy use and Net Energy Value per Gallon Dry vs. Wet Milling Processes (BTUs per gallon) Biomass Feedstocks
    • Chapter 3: World Bioenergy Activities & Technologies Table 3-1: World Consumption of Energy, by Energy Types and Country Group, 2002, 2009 and 2014 (in quadrillion BTUs) Figure 3-1: Global Share of Energy Consumption, by Source, 2009 vs. 2014 Table 3-2: U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption, by Source, 2008, 2009 and 2014 (trillion BTU) Table 3-3: U.S. Renewable Energy Capacity and Electricity Generation, by Source, 2009 and 2014 Table 3-4: Electricity Generation Capacity, by Source and Region, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) Table 3-5: Electricity Generation Capacity, by Source in France, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) Table 3-6: Electricity Generation Capacity, by Source in China, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) Table 3-7: Electricity Generation Capacity, by Source in India, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) Table 3-8: Electricity Generation Capacity, by Source in Brazil, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) Table 3-9: Bioenergy Supply, by Region, 2006, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) Table 3-10: Bioenergy Production, by Country, 2006, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) External Factors Affect Growth of Biofuels Table 3-11: Consumption of Bioenergy Supply, by Region, 2006, 2009 and 2014 (GwH) Table 3-12: Percent of Domestically Produced Bioenergy Consumed, by Region, 2006, 2009 and 2014 Figure 3-2: Percent of Domestically Produced Bioenergy Consumed, 2006, 2009, and 2014 Food Prices Fuel Biomass Debate Figure 3-3: U.S. Producer Price Index of Biomass Conversion Components, 2004-2014 United States Remains Hotbed of Biomass Activity Table 3-13: U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption, by Sector and Source, 2009 and 2014 (in quadrillion BTUs) Table 3-14: U.S. Production of Electricity from Biomass and Other Renewable Sources, by Region, 2009 (MwH) Figure 3-4: Share of Electricity Produced from Biomass to Other Renewable Sources, by U.S. Region, 2009 and 2014 Table 3-15: U.S. Production of Electricity from Biomass and Other Renewable Sources, by Region, 2014 (MwH) Table 3-16: Operational Biorefineries, by State, 2009 Table 3-17: State Biorefinery Generation Capacity, 2009 and 2014 (MwH) Figure 3-5: U.S. Biomass Plant Capacity, 2002 to 2014 (MwH) Biofuel Technology Research Table 3-18: Average Expenditures on Energy Research and Development, by IEA Nations, 2000 and 2005 with Projections by SBI for 2009 and 2014 (in $ millions)
    • Reduction of Greenhouse Gases Figure 3-6: U.S. Emissions of Carbon Dioxide, 2009 and 2014 (in billions of metric tons) Table 3-19: World Carbon Dioxide Emissions, by Region (in millions of metric tons of CO2)Chapter 4: World Biomass Market Trends Table 4-1: Global Market Values of Biofuel and Bioenergy (Organic and Technology) Manufacturing, by Country, 2009 and 2014 (in $ millions) Figure 4-1: Compound Annual Growth Rate of Biofuel and Bioenergy Conversion (Organic and Technology Segments), by Country, 2009 to 2014 Table 4-2: Global Liquid Ethanol Production, by Country or Region, 2007, 2009 and 2014 (millions of gallons) Table 4-3: Global Liquid Biodiesel Capacity, by Country, 2002, 2009 and 2014 (in millions of gallons) Table 4-4: Production of Mill Residue, by State, 2009 and 2014 (thousands of dry tons) Table 4-5: U.S. Market Value of Biomass Manufacturing, Organic and Technology, 2006 to 2009 Shipments of Organic Biomass Feedstocks Table 4-6: U.S. Imports of Ethanol, by Country of Origin, 2007 to 2014 (in millions of gallons) Table 4-7: U.S. Ethanol Production Capacity, by Type of Feedstock, 2009 and 2014 (in millions of gallons) Table 4-8: U.S. Production of Corn and its Share Used for Ethanol Conversion, 2009 to 2014 Table 4-9: U.S. Export Value of Feedstocks Used for Bioenergy and Liquid Biofuel Manufacturing, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Table 4-10: U.S. Export Value of Wheat, by Country, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Table 4-11: U.S. Export Value of Corn, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Biodiesel Trade Market in Flux Table 4-12: Biodiesel Imports, by Region, 2008 to 2014 (in million gallons) Table 4-13: Biodiesel Exports, by Region, 2008 to 2014 (in million gallons) Table 4-14: U.S. Exports of Soybean Oil, by Country, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Imports of Organic Biomass Table 4-15: U.S. Import Value of Organic Biomass Feedstocks for Biofuel Conversion, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Table 4-16: U.S. Import Value of Corn, by Country, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Table 4-17: U.S. Soybean Production and its Use for Biodiesel Production, 2009 to 2014 Table 4-18: U.S. Import Value of Oilseeds, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) U.S. Shipments of Biomass Conversion Technology Components Table 4-19: U.S. Shipment Value of Biomass Conversion Technology Components, 2004 to 2009 (in $ millions)
    • Table 4-20: U.S. Market Value of Biomass Conversion Technology Components, 2004 to 2009 (in $ millions) Figure 4-2: Biomass Conversion Technology Share of Shipment Value, 2004, 2009 and 2014 Imports of Technology Components Figure 4-3: Share of Import Shipment Value, by Technology Component, 2004 and 2009 Table 4-21: U.S. Imports of Industrial Furnaces, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Figure 4-4: U.S. Imports and Exports of Organic and Technology Components of Biomass Conversion, 2006 to 2014 (expressed as a percentage of total market value) Biomass Conversion Technology Exports Table 4-22: U.S. Export Value of Metal Tanks, by Country, 2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ thousands) Table 4-23: U.S. Export Value of Metal Cans, by Country, 2004 to 2009 (e) (in $ thousands) Table 4-24: U.S. Exports of Industrial Furnaces, 2004 and 2009 (in $ thousands) Source: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, Stat-USA, USA Trade Online. Calculated and estimated by SBI Market Value Forecast Through 2014 Figure 4-5: Share of Global Market Value for Biofuel and Bioenergy Manufacturing, by Country, 2009 and 2014 Table 4-25: U.S. Shipment Value of Organic Biomass Manufacturing, 2006, 2009 and 2014 (in $ millions) Table 4-26: U.S. Market Value Forecast of Organic and Technology Components for Biomass Conversion, 2006, 2009 and 2014 (in $ millions) Table 4-27: U.S. Shipment and Market Value of Biomass Conversion Technology Component Manufacturing, 2009 to 2014 (in $ millions) Figure 4-6: U.S. Share of Market Value for Organic and Technology Components Used in Biomass Conversion, 2006, 2009, 2014Chapter 5: Manufacturer ProfilesArcher Daniels Midland (ADM) Corporate Background Industry Segments Oilseeds Processing Corn Processing Agricultural Services Other Table 5-1: ADM Revenue, by Industry Segment, 2007-2008 Figure 5-1: ADM’s 2008 Share of Revenues, by Division Company News Outlook Personnel ChangesBunge Corporate Background Industry Segments
    • Table 5-2: Bunge Revenue, by Industry Segment, 2007-2008 Company News OutlookCHS Corporate Background Industry Segments Renewable Energy Figure 5-2: CHS 2008 Share of Revenues, by Business Segment (in $ billions) Company News OutlookRoyal Dutch Shell Corporate Background Industry Segments Table 5-3: Shell Revenues, by Business Segment, 2007-2008 (in $ billions) Company News OutlookFoster Wheeler Corporate Background Industry Segments Company News OutlookWilmar Corporate Background Industry Segments OutlookTenaska Corporate Background Industry Segments OutlookChapter 6: Innovations in Biofuel Technology U.S. Backs Biofuel Innovations Diversity of Cellulosic Feedstocks Federal Funding Fuels Innovation DOE Funds Advanced Biofuels Projects Innovations in Biorefineries Table 6-1: Advanced Biorefinery Concepts Whole Crop Biorefineries Ligno Cellulosic Feedstock Biorefineries (LCFBR) Green Biorefineries Two Platform Concept Biorefinery (TPCBR) Marine Biorefinery (MBR) Thermo Chemical Biorefinery (TCBR) Innovations in Biofuel Processing Advances in Ethanol Separation Technologies Germ and Fiber Separation Enzymatic Dry Milling
    • Dry Fractionation Ammonia Process in the Wet Mill Continuous Membrane Reactor for Starch Hydrolysis Alkali Wet Milling High-Gravity Fermentation Improved Yeast Conversion of Pentose Sugars to Ethanol Enzymes for Liquefaction and Saccharification Enzymes to Reduce Sulfur Dioxide Distillation Technology Control Systems Environmental Technologies Biodiesel Derived From TallowChapter 7: Consumers of Biofuels Biofuel Energy Policy Fuels Debate Table 7-1: Renewable Fuel Volume Requirements for RFS2, 2008-2022 (billion gallons) Feedstock Implications Legislation Favors E85 Production Figure 7-1: U.S. Consumer Opinions About Biofuels (% who fully agree) Biofuel’s Effect on Food Prices Studies Point to Ethanol’s Effect on Food Prices Biofuels Lobbying Efforts Table 7-2: Top 25 Expenditures on Biofuel Lobbying in 2008, by Company or Group Global Policies Toward Biofuels European Union Changes Biofuel Composition Japan Continues Import Strategy India Ethanol Blends Fluctuate China Steps Up Corn Ethanol ProductionAppendix: Addresses of Selected Companies and OrganizationsAvailable immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=1926676US: 800.298.5699
    • UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004