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Seven Keys to Executing a Successful Marketing
 Campaign that Combines Direct Postal Mail and Email
                      ...
Use personalization with your emails, too. Good email marketing systems allow you to
   personalize content with salutatio...
The initial print piece is just that -- the initial step in a process. Many people who receive your
   print piece -- even...
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Seven Keys to Executing a Successful Marketing Campaign that Combines Direct Postal Mail and Email

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Transcript of "Seven Keys to Executing a Successful Marketing Campaign that Combines Direct Postal Mail and Email"

  1. 1. Seven Keys to Executing a Successful Marketing Campaign that Combines Direct Postal Mail and Email By Tom Ruwitch (tom@MarketVolt.com) and Aaron Corson (Aaron@MarketPathOnline.com) We frequently hear clients and prospects tell us that they prefer email marketing to direct (postal) mail marketing because email is so much less expensive. Sure, direct mail costs more than email. But when was the last time your company calculated profit by measuring costs alone? If executed well, direct mail can be a cost-effective way to generate sales and profits. Direct mail works especially well when combined with other marketing tools such as email. One of the most effective formulas to acquire and than convert leads is to:  Send direct mail to a list of cold leads.  Invite them to visit a special page on your web site where they enter their contact information to receive something from you (entry to a contest, a set of tips, etc).  Use email (and other media) for an ongoing campaign to convert them from leads to prospects to clients.  Continue to communicate with them to maximize the length and value of that relationship for you and your business. Here are seven keys to accomplish all of the above with maximum efficiency and minimum hassle: 1. Choose Your Lists Carefully Your marketing campaign is only as good as your target market. Not all lists are created equal. If you plan to purchase a list for your campaign, work with a reputable list vendor – or someone who has such relationships – who can find leads that correspond with your business goals. The cheapest list is rarely the best list. Cheap lists may save you money up front, but you’ll earn far less in the long run. The do-it-yourself list bazaars are OK, but rarely your best option. 2. Personalize Your Content Choose a printer who can personalize the content of each print piece by including the recipient's name (and perhaps other data, such as the recipient's city). Such personalization will result in far higher conversions than non-personalized content. When shopping for printing vendors, ask whether they can handle "variable data printing." -1– ©2010, Foundry Software / MarketVolt
  2. 2. Use personalization with your emails, too. Good email marketing systems allow you to personalize content with salutations (i.e. Dear Bill) and, better yet, dynamic content (i.e. include a blurb about dog toys for the dog lovers and a blurb about cat toys for cat lovers). 3. Include Direct Calls to Action in Your Print and Email Copy Your print piece should explicitly tell recipients what to do and why. "Visit <this web address> to get a free report that will show you how to..." Marketing pieces, especially print pieces, too frequently describe your products and services and include a phone number and web address without any direct call to action. It's not enough for you to imply that readers should call that number or visit that web site. Tell them what to do and describe what's in it for them. If you do this, more people will act, and you'll convert more sales. 4. Drive Recipients to a Personalized Web Page Using PURLs Many printers and email vendors can create personalized pages with recipient-specific web addresses called PURLs. Response and conversion rates improve dramatically when you use PURLs. For example, if Acme Widgets sends a piece to John Doe in Springfield, it might include copy that says something like this: "Hi John -- We're so glad to share this offer with you and other residents of Springfield...Please go to http://johndoe.acmewidgets.com to get..." When John goes to that address, he will see a page with a personalized greeting (i.e. Welcome John Doe). PURLs are a great tool because personalization works (see #2) and because they're trackable (see #6). 5. Recognize that Sales is A Process not An Event Too many marketing pieces are designed simply as branding or image advertising pieces. Those who are ready to buy may respond to the piece right away. But most people you target are not ready buyers. Think of the Goodyear blimp. The 70,000 people in the stadium below are not going immediately after the game to buy new tires. Goodyear flies that blimp over the stadium to enhance their brand and their image. Goodyear hopes those people will remember the brand when it's time for them to buy. Giant companies like Goodyear can afford to market like this, putting blimps and magazine advertisements and television ads in front of a market in hopes that people will think Goodyear first when shopping for tires. Smaller businesses don't have that luxury or that kind of marketing budget. But you do have the names and email addresses of the people who respond to your print piece. Don't assume the job is over after they read your print piece and visit the web page. Follow up. Send them more information by email. Pick up the phone. Send another print piece. -2– ©2010, Foundry Software / MarketVolt
  3. 3. The initial print piece is just that -- the initial step in a process. Many people who receive your print piece -- even those who visit the page to which you direct them -- won't buy immediately. You have to nurture them to convert them from lead to prospect to client. That means you have to follow-up with a continuous flow of marketing messages. Those who opt-in to receive the thing you offer on your web page should receive a follow-up email within days of opting-in. 6. Measure and Analyze Are you spending your marketing dollars wisely? How do you know? If you can't measure the results, you're simply guessing. If you follow the tips above, you can measure the results. You'll know exactly: o How many people (and who) went from the print piece to the web site. o How many people (and who) gave you their email addresses after visiting the web site. o How many people (and who) responded to the follow-up offer(s) you make in your emails. Ultimately, you can measure the true costs to acquire a lead and to convert a sale. Of course, you know how much revenue you earn from the sale. Consider that you can have repeat sales, referrals and other value from that client (weigh the lifetime value of the client against the cost to acquire him), and you have a clear picture of whether your marketing dollars are well spent. 7. Rinse and Repeat - with Refinements If you successfully execute an integrated marketing campaign, you can repeat the process with great confidence of similar results -- better results if you refine the campaign to correct mistakes. If you acquire 100 clients through profitable integrated marketing campaign, why not try a similar campaign with another list? Tweak the campaign to get better results. The numbers don't lie. If you're successful once, you'll be successful again -- as long as you have a market to tap. -3– ©2010, Foundry Software / MarketVolt

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