Systemic m&e in market development

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  • 1. MONITORING  &  MEASURING  CHANGE   IN  MARKET  SYSTEMS   Systemic  M&E  Principles  in  the  context  of   Kenya’s  Market  Assistance  Programme    
  • 2. SEVEN  PRINCIPLES  FOR  M&E  OF  INCLUSIVE   MARKET  DEVELOPMENT     •  •  USAID-­‐funded  SEEP  Network  Case  Study  based  on   Kenya  Market  Trust’s  DfID-­‐funded  Market  Assistance   Programme   hIp://www.slideshare.net/MarketDevelopmentEastAfrica/ systemic-­‐me-­‐case-­‐study  
  • 3. •  Markets  are  complex  adapQve  systems  (conQnually   evolve  and  adapt)   •  M&E  frameworks  for  inclusive  market  development   must  embrace  systemic  thinking  and  complexity   science  as  well  as  culQvate  flexibility  and   organizaQonal  learning  
  • 4. PRINCIPLE  1:  INDIRECTNESS  OF  IMPACT   Systemic  change  cannot  be  directly  delivered     by  a  development  iniQaQve  from  outside     -­‐  needs  to  emerge  from  within  the  system     Issues:   •  Difference  between  direct  and  indirect  beneficiaries   becomes  pracQcally  useless     •  InformaQon  needed  for  management  and  learning  is   different  from  the  informaQon  required  by  donors  
  • 5. PRINCIPLE  2:  DEPTH  OF  IMPACT   •  Changes  in  a  system  are  different  depending  on  how  structural  and  long-­‐ lasQng  (how  “deep”)  they  are   •  •  •  Closer  aIenQon  must  be  paid  to  deeper  changes   •  •  •      •  Superficial  changes:  variaQons  in  incomes  and  number  of  jobs   Deeper  changes:  self-­‐awareness  -­‐  when  the  system  quesQons  its  own  nature  and   evoluQon;  creaQon  of  new  relaQonships,  increased  access  to  informaQon,  shi^s  in   behavior  and  power  dynamics   Consider  range  of  indicators  and  signals  that  indicate  that  change  is  occurring  at   deeper,  more  structural  levels  of  the  system   Look  beyond  the  individual  market  actors  and  their  business  models  to  find  paIerns   that  are  emerging  in  the  wider  system   Put  a  strong  emphasis  on  behavioral  aspects  of  the  market  actors     Issues:   •  •  Pressure  from  donors  to  focus  on  reporQng  impacts  of  superficial  changes   All  types  of  change  provide  useful  informaQon,  but  an  exclusive  focus  on  the  most   superficial  ones  will  have  negaQve  consequences  on  sustainability  and  scalability    
  • 6. PRINCIPLE  3:  NETWORK-­‐DRIVEN  CHANGE   •  Work  with  collaborators  who  have  potenQal  to  produce   changes  that  “reverberate”  throughout  the  system   •  •  •  •  •  Understand  structures  and  dynamics  of  networks     Create  condiQons  for  self-­‐selecQon  of  key  collaborators   z   Promote  disseminaQon,  copying,  and  adaptaQon  by   collaborators  of  the  successes  or  lessons  generated   Change  is  driven  by  the  collaborators’  networks,  not  by  them  as   individuals   Unresolved  issue:   •  •  M&E  framework  does  not  generally  have  procedures  or  tools  to   measure  network  structures  and  dynamics   Remains  in  the  subjecQve  or  intuiQve  domain,  linked  to  the   people  who  interact  with  the  networks  on  a  regular  basis  
  • 7. PRINCIPLE  4:  UNPREDICTABILITY   Behavior  and  evoluQon  of  complex  systems     resist  predicQon     •  Need  flexibility,  rapid  learning,  and  effecQve   collaboraQon     •  •  •  OrganizaQonal  culture  that  rewards  faster  learning,  course   correcQon,  adaptaQon  to  unexpected  circumstances,  promotes   trust,  values  mistakes  and  problems  as  opportuniQes  for  success   Movement  away  from  long-­‐term,  staQc  strategic  analysis  and   planning  of  fixed  indicators     Allow  teams  to  discuss  and  re-­‐evaluate  intervenQons,  exchange   lessons  quickly  and  reflect  about  progress  and  challenges  
  • 8. PRINCIPLE  5:  SENSITIVITY  TO  EXTERNAL  SIGNALS   •  •  •  •  When  an  NGO  or  a  donor  declares  intenQon  to  intervene  in  a   market  system,  public  and  private  actors  adapt  their  behavior   and  strategies,  seeking  to  maximize  benefits  in  many  different   ways  (eg  for  economic  gain,  reputaQon,  and  influence)   Facilitators  must  be  careful  about  the  signals  they  consciously  or   unconsciously  send  when  they  engage  with  market  actors   Successful  facilitators  manage  the  signals  they  send  to  promote  self-­‐selecQon   and  determine  the  honesty  and  commitment  of  strategic  actors  who  are   willing  to  collaborate   How  a  program  uses  its  own  idenQty  is    very  important  and  needs  to  be   tailored  to  the  specific  situaQon  (challenging  the  hypothesis  that  minimizing   the  possibility  of  being  perceived  as  an  influenQal  subsidy-­‐giver  or  helper  is   the  only  recommended  strategy  for  facilitators)  
  • 9. PRINCIPLE  6:  INFORMATION  DEFICIT   No  maIer  how  much  we  know  about  a  market  system,  there  will   always  be  informaQon  that  we  ignore  that  can  have  important   consequences  on  how  the  system  performs  and  evolves       •  •  •  •  •  QuesQon  how  much  we  should  know  before  we  intervene  in  the  system   Need  for  conQnuous  learning,  effecQve  communicaQon  and  collaboraQon   among  key  stakeholders  and  partners,  opportunism  and  flexibility   throughout  the  design,  implementaQon,  M&E   M&E  Framework  co-­‐evolves  with  the  staff’s  knowledge  and  understanding   of  the  system   Do  fewer  detailed,  hands-­‐off  analyses  (“cold”  analyses)  and  more  “full   immersions”  in  the  system  (closer  and  more  frequent  interacQons  with   stakeholders  to  experiment  with  new  ideas)   AIach  a  high  value  to  informaQon  from  field  observaQons  
  • 10. PRINCIPLE  7:  SUSTAINABILITY  AS  ADAPTABILITY   •  Sustainability:  efforts  to  increase  the  capacity  of   market  actors  to  conQnue  changing  their  own   systems  in  the  eventuality  of  shocks  or  new  trends   •  M&E  frameworks  need  to  detect  whether  a  system  is   building  its  capacity  to  adapt  to  shocks  and  new   trends   Require  shi^  in  understanding  of  “sustainability,”   from  the  permanence  of  given  outcomes  through   Qme,  to  the  capacity  of  a  system  to  benefit  from  new   opportuniQes  and  minimize  negaQve  impacts     •