CS 354 Interaction

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March 29, 2012 lecture; CS 354 Computer Graphics; University of Texas at Austin

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CS 354 Interaction

  1. 1. CS 354Interaction &Project 2Mark KilgardUniversity of TexasMarch 29, 2012
  2. 2. CS 354 2 Today’s material  In-class quiz  On compression lecture  Lecture topic  Project 2  Interaction
  3. 3. CS 354 3 My Office Hours  Tuesday, before class  Painter (PAI) 5.35  8:45 a.m. to 9:15  Thursday, after class  ACE 6.302  11:00 a.m. to 12  Randy’s office hours  Monday & Wednesday  11 a.m. to 12:00  Painter (PAI) 5.33
  4. 4. CS 354 4 Last time, this time  Last lecture, we discussed  Project 2 on Programmable Shaders  Compression for Computer Graphics  This lecture  Project 2 discussion  Get started now  Interaction
  5. 5. CS 354 5 On a sheet of paper Daily Quiz • Write your EID, name, and date • Write #1, #2, #3, #4 followed by its answer  True or False: A  True or False: Run- hardware texture length encoding works compression scheme well for digital must be capable of photographs. random access decompression.  If the surface normals in a mesh are each stored  True or False: Floating as an index into a set of point values are required 256 quantized normals to have at least 23 bits rather than as three 32- devoted to the mantissa bit floating point and 8 bits for the numbers, what exponent. compression ratio is achieved over the floating-point representation?
  6. 6. CS 354 6 Project 2  Project is NOW available  PDF + code to use  Requirements  Mostly writing GLSL shaders  Small amount of C/C++ code  Convert height map to normal map  Implement NormalMap::computeNormal method  Intermediate milestone  Monday, April 2nd  Submit snapshots and GLSL code for first two shaders  Complete project  Due Friday, April 6th  All 9 shaders  Embellish for additional credit
  7. 7. CS 354 7 By April 2  Have these first two shaders tasks implemented Task 1: apply decal Task 0: roll torus
  8. 8. CS 354 8 Procedurally Generating a Torus from a 2D Grid 2D grid over (s,t)∈[0,1] Tessellated torus
  9. 9. CS 354 9 GLSL Standard Library Routines You’ll Need for Project 2  texture2D—accesses a 2D texture through a sampler2D and a 2-component texture coordinate set (s,t)  textureCube—access a cube map with a samplerCube and a 3-component texture coordinate set (s,t,r)  normalize—normalizes a vector  cross—computes a cross product of 2 vectors  dot—computes a dot (inner) product of 2 vectors  max—compute the maximum of two values  reflect—compute a reflection vector given an incident vector and a normal vector  vec3—constructor for 3-component vector from scalars  mat3—constructor for 3x3 matrix from column vectors  *—matrix-by-vector or vector-by-matrix multiplication  sin—sine trigonometric function  cos—cosine trigonometric function  pow—raise a number to a power, exponentiation (hint: specular)
  10. 10. CS 354 10 Interaction with Computer Graphics  Graphics isn’t just about pretty pictures  It’s also about interacting with pictures SketchPad 1963 Ivan Sutherland
  11. 11. CS 354 11 Event Models  Polling  “while loop” reads events & processes them  Good for events arriving at a regular rate  Appropriate when events aren’t “digital”  May require sampling analog signals  Event-driven  Structured to avoid “busy waiting”  Callback-driven programming  GLUT’s event loop is callback-driven
  12. 12. CS 354 12 Physical Events vs. Logical Events  Physical events  Logical events  Real-world input  Examples  Examples  Key press delivered to a particular window the  Key presses mouse cusor is in  Physical link layer for  Byte stream from a networking network socket  Charged-coupled  Mouse clicked on an device (CCD) captures object in a 3D scene image  May require signal  Higher-level processing to make into a digital event  Prone to noise
  13. 13. CS 354 13 Routing Events  What entity is interested in an event?  How is the event routed to the interested entity?  Example: window system events  Mouse events generated by mouse  Button clicks and movement must go to the correct window region  Window regions arranged hierarchically  Two or more events may be connected  The press & release of a mouse must be paired
  14. 14. CS 354 14 Model-View-Controller  Software architecture approach  Separates concerns Model updates modifies Data and logic View Controller modifies Interface / display User input user responds to view with input
  15. 15. CS 354 15 Interactivity  Interaction Latency  Time from visual display to user action to displayed response to user interaction  Low latency provides illusion of continuous interaction  Graphics device display frames  Roughly 60 frames/second provides continuous interaction  Roughly 16.6 milliseconds  Display devices tuned to this
  16. 16. CS 354 16 Frame Buffering  Problem with just one framebuffer  Updating the buffer you are displaying results in flicker and tearing  One solution  Timing framebuffer updates to not be updating pixels about to be scanned out  Known as “racing the beam”  Solution: Two buffers  One to display NOW  One to render NOW so to display NEXT  Ping-pong between the two buffers  Alternatively, copy “draw” buffer to “display” buffer every frame  Either approach needs synchornization
  17. 17. CS 354 17 Synchronized Buffer Swaps  Stall generate next frame until displaying the last frame 16.6 milliseconds
  18. 18. CS 354 18 Unsynchronized Buffers Swaps  More frame rendered and lower latency to display  But tearing artifacts on displays  And some frames rendered but never displayed  Wasted work 16.6 milliseconds tearing artifacts
  19. 19. CS 354 19 Triple Buffering  Expensive Compromise  Needs more memory, now 3 buffers  Renders frames that may never be displayed  But avoids tearing while minimizing latency 16.6 milliseconds
  20. 20. CS 354 20 Complex Interactions  Dragging objects  Cut-and-paste  Pop-up and pull-down menus  Selecting an object within a 3D scene
  21. 21. CS 354 21 State Machines to Managed Complex Interactions  Think of on-screen “button”  You can click with the mouse  How does it really logically work?
  22. 22. CS 354 22 Manipulators and Choosers Open Inventor
  23. 23. CS 354 23 Intuitive Interactions  Make computer behave in a way that’s natural to humans  NOT the other way around  Good rules of thumb  Hint what the result of an interaction will be  Locate highlight buttons  Change cursor shape based on its position  Provide immediate and continuous display of state  Show mercy, people make mistakes, be able to undo  Make manipulation as direct as possible  Examples  Dragging and dropping objects  Pointing to indicate interest
  24. 24. CS 354 24 Back Projection  User clicks on screen…  Question: What object got “clicked”?  Known as “picking” in 3D applications  Basic operation in 3D applications  Process  Window system maps click to (x,y) in a particular window  Delivers the event to application selecting events on the window  Applications gets (x,y) in window space  Walk through scene graph  Invert viewport, projection, and modelview transforms  Back project point to object space ray  Intersect the ray with each object in scene graph  Does the ray intersect the object?  What intersected object is the closest?  Return the nearest object intersecting the ray as a “hit”
  25. 25. CS 354 25 Conceptual Vertex Transformation glVertex* object-space coordinates Modelview eye-space coordinates User-defined API (xo,yo,zo,wo) matrix (xe,ye,ze,we) clip planes commands (xe,ye,ze,we) clipped eye-space coordinates (xe,ye,ze,we) clip-space clipped clip-space Projection coordinates View-frustum coordinates Perspective matrix (xc,yc,zc,wc) clip planes (xc,yc,zc,wc) division normalized device coordinates (NDC) (xn,yn,zn,1/wc) window-space Viewport + Depth Range coordinates to primitive transformation (xw,yw,zw,1/wc) rasterization
  26. 26. CS 354 26 Reversed Vertex Transformation glVertex* object-space coordinates Modelview eye-space coordinates User-defined API (xo,yo,zo,wo) matrix (xe,ye,ze,we) clip planes commands (xe,ye,ze,we) clipped eye-space coordinates (xe,ye,ze,we) clip-space clipped clip-space Projection coordinates View-frustum coordinates Perspective matrix (xc,yc,zc,wc) clip planes (xc,yc,zc,wc) division normalized device coordinates (NDC) (xn,yn,zn,1/wc) (x,y) mouse event window-space Viewport + Depth Range coordinates to primitive transformation (xw,yw,zw,1/wc) rasterization
  27. 27. CS 354 27 New Current Interaction Paradigms  Multi-touch screens  Phones, tablets… work surfaces? Perceptive Pixel
  28. 28. CS 354 28 Where next?  Visual, tactile, gestures, speech, highly responsive, emotionally aware  Minority Report interface…
  29. 29. CS 354 29 Next Class  Next lecture  Procedural methods  Making shape, appearance, and animation from programs—instead of data  Project 2  Start learning GLSL and doing project  Due Friday, April 6th  Incremental deadline on April 2nd  First two tasks

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