Common Research Ground in Social Innovation - DIY Initiatives - IADIS 2013 PRAAG

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IADIS International Workshop "Common Research Ground in Social Innovation?", 24 July 2013, Prague, Czech Republic

Both societal and economic reconstructions elicit new initiatives that exceed the speed of social innovation as we have seen for a long time. This workshop presents the more dominant examples like the civil initiative in social media that resulted in an Interactive Map of Temporary use of Wastelands.

Bottom-up initiatives no longer are regarded upon as exceptional in urban development. Due to the financial crisis, lack of corporate funding and budget-cuts of municipalities the traditional stakeholders are sharing the floor with civilians and their actions. The combination of Do-it Yourself initiatives, entrepreneurship, co-creation and social media provides an exciting new perspective on change. Recently urban and rural fabric show a growing number of empty lots and properties due to social economic transitions. Such empty places have always form fertile ground for bottom-up initiatives on temporary use. Increasingly however residents, civilians, entrepreneurs, and other parties connect through social media and internet in order to combine options for such empty places. They strengthen local networks by sharing functions and activities, or use crowdsourcing or crowdfunding. At the same time formal procedures and former economic considerations of municipalities, project developers and stakeholders tend to obstruct bottom-up initiatives. For example, the temporary use of empty housing plots in Almere as public playing grounds with private playing objects runs afoul with the formal rules and regulations regarding playing in the public domain. Another example, www.thuisafgehaald.nl, a bottom-up initiative on cooking for other people in your own home, combines private social investment with internet and clashes with the law on Food safety, on support of restaurant businesses.

Social innovation results within this complex interaction of bottom-up initiatives, internet and social media, traditional stakeholders, finances, formalities and legal issues. The workshop is an inspiring venue for practitioners and researchers to explore the knowledge of bottom-up initiatives. We are therefore expecting both researchers and practitioners to provide case study input and experience in social innovation, social media and social networks. The aim is to result in the start of a multidisciplinary research coalition for Europe Horizon 2020.

Organizers

Pat van der Jagt, Alterra, Wageningen UR
Piet Kommers, University of Twente
Mark Verhijde, Program Manager Urban Development

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  • Social innovation Discussion is addressing societal change through people, policy, programs and projects, that enhance the quality of life and social cohesion through innovative social processes. We are as a group fascinated by the fact that increasingly people are starting initiatives and form networks to solve specific problems or issues in society. These processes are stimulated nowadays by the network society, internet and social media. We see Initiatives of active citizens Entreprenuers Social movenements As seeds, starting points that could leed to social innovation. Our study area therefor is focussing on the emergens of social innovation Within this workshop we would like to tap the knowledge of this group on research methodology to understand the emergence of social innovation 25-06-13
  • Choosing a workshop working method in order to work in smaller groups to optimize interaction with you. We are presenting some cases, work in groups to see what you can add to this topic in terms or research practices and methodologies. Let’s start 25-06-13
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  • Social innovation Discussion is addressing societal change through, people policy, programs and projects, that enhance the quality of life and social cohesion through innovative social processes. Not about market profit but about social outcomes. These processes are highly dependent on social structures and their understanding of societal challenges and change. At this moment the biggest driver to social innovation practices is the Economic crisis. Governments are no longer having an answer to social challenges and this gap is stimulating innovative social processes. Within different contexts there is debat around social innovation resulting in different discourse Governmental discourse (mainly adopted by European commission): reviltalizing policy by making it more effective and adapted to social needs (poverty, social inclusion, climate change etc.) (participatory and collaborative methods, codesign and cocreation) example ( oriented towards organization and management of the government itself but also on the effectiveness of policy and instruments. More inclusive governance Entrepreneurial discourse (quite similar to governmental discourse with difference that community becomes more and more active (more on creating social value than on financial benefits (playing with community action and social cohesion) examples in health care, social care and education (in poor communities e.g.) in between private, public and market sector. (public rather passive, act within the specificitie of the entrepreneur. Redefine market principles: new business models, financing structures, flexible organizations, leadership etc Academic discourse (linking social innovation to social action and social change) not based on patterns and the generic, but on the particular and on the culture as an expression of context. New concepts, strategies, initiatives, products and processes or organizations that meet pressing social needs, changing routines, resources and authority flows. Context = culture, values, beleifs, practices that play a role in developing prototypes. Lacking is how social innovation emerges, how it comes into being, who shapes it and by which means Lacking is the innovation that is being raised by civil initiatives. DIY trend of society: with and for the community but not by Therefor we introduce the Civil initiative discourse: focussing on the emergence, the how and the why of informal initiatives initiated by the community, Change is a result of human interaction, exchange of knowledge and ideas and the creation of new networks 25-06-13
  • Social innovation Discussion is addressing societal change through, people policy, programs and projects, that enhance the quality of life and social cohesion through innovative social processes. Not about market profit but about social outcomes. These processes are highly dependent on social structures and their understanding of societal challenges and change. At this moment the biggest driver to social innovation practices is the Economic crisis. Governments are no longer having an answer to social challenges and this gap is stimulating innovative social processes. Within different contexts there is debat around social innovation resulting in different discourse Governmental discourse (mainly adopted by European commission): reviltalizing policy by making it more effective and adapted to social needs (poverty, social inclusion, climate change etc.) (participatory and collaborative methods, codesign and cocreation) example ( oriented towards organization and management of the government itself but also on the effectiveness of policy and instruments. More inclusive governance Entrepreneurial discourse (quite similar to governmental discourse with difference that community becomes more and more active (more on creating social value than on financial benefits (playing with community action and social cohesion) examples in health care, social care and education (in poor communities e.g.) in between private, public and market sector. (public rather passive, act within the specificitie of the entrepreneur. Redefine market principles: new business models, financing structures, flexible organizations, leadership etc Academic discourse (linking social innovation to social action and social change) not based on patterns and the generic, but on the particular and on the culture as an expression of context. New concepts, strategies, initiatives, products and processes or organizations that meet pressing social needs, changing routines, resources and authority flows. Context = culture, values, beleifs, practices that play a role in developing prototypes. Lacking is how social innovation emerges, how it comes into being, who shapes it and by which means Lacking is the innovation that is being raised by civil initiatives. DIY trend of society: with and for the community but not by Therefor we introduce the Civil initiative discourse: focussing on the emergence, the how and the why of informal initiatives initiated by the community, Change is a result of human interaction, exchange of knowledge and ideas and the creation of new networks 25-06-13
  • Social innovation Discussion is addressing societal change through, people policy, programs and projects, that enhance the quality of life and social cohesion through innovative social processes. Not about market profit but about social outcomes. These processes are highly dependent on social structures and their understanding of societal challenges and change. At this moment the biggest driver to social innovation practices is the Economic crisis. Governments are no longer having an answer to social challenges and this gap is stimulating innovative social processes. Within different contexts there is debat around social innovation resulting in different discourse Governmental discourse (mainly adopted by European commission): reviltalizing policy by making it more effective and adapted to social needs (poverty, social inclusion, climate change etc.) (participatory and collaborative methods, codesign and cocreation) example ( oriented towards organization and management of the government itself but also on the effectiveness of policy and instruments. More inclusive governance Entrepreneurial discourse (quite similar to governmental discourse with difference that community becomes more and more active (more on creating social value than on financial benefits (playing with community action and social cohesion) examples in health care, social care and education (in poor communities e.g.) in between private, public and market sector. (public rather passive, act within the specificitie of the entrepreneur. Redefine market principles: new business models, financing structures, flexible organizations, leadership etc Academic discourse (linking social innovation to social action and social change) not based on patterns and the generic, but on the particular and on the culture as an expression of context. New concepts, strategies, initiatives, products and processes or organizations that meet pressing social needs, changing routines, resources and authority flows. Context = culture, values, beleifs, practices that play a role in developing prototypes. Lacking is how social innovation emerges, how it comes into being, who shapes it and by which means Lacking is the innovation that is being raised by civil initiatives. DIY trend of society: with and for the community but not by Therefor we introduce the Civil initiative discourse: focussing on the emergence, the how and the why of informal initiatives initiated by the community, Change is a result of human interaction, exchange of knowledge and ideas and the creation of new networks 25-06-13
  • Netwerksamenleving: Als we de samenleving voorstellen als een rizoom (netwerk van netwerken), begrijpen we dat er net als bij een rizoom allerlei spontane verbindingen tot stand komen. De samenleving is dan niet ontworpen, is geen organisatie, is niet logisch opgebouwd, is geen orgaan. De samenleving is een dynamisch netwerk van personen en organisaties die allemaal met elkaar verbonden zijn, en waarin tegelijkertijd geen samenhang, maar juist fragmentatie en gelaagdheid te ontdekken valt. Verbondenheid zonder samenhang is een belangrijk kenmerk van het rizoom. De netwerken leveren de structuur voor een continue stroom van informatie. De creatie, verspreiding en manipulatie van informatiestromen vormen de basis voor onze huidige maatschappij. Zij kenmerken zich door snelle veranderingen op economisch, bestuurlijk, maatschappelijk en technologisch gebied. Rol sociale media: De lage opkomst bij de inenting tegen baarmoederhalskanker (Stop de prik!-hyves), de Arabische lente, de Londense voetbalrellen en de crisis mapping tijdens de aardbeving en tsunami in Japan (Ushahidi), het zijn recente voorbeelden die allemaal één ding gemeen hebben: ze laten zien hoe burgers met behulp van internet en sociale media steeds meer in staat zijn om hun mening te geven, kennis uit te wisselen, samen te werken en zich te organiseren. En dat op een schaal en met een dynamiek die groter is dan ooit tevoren. Er ontstaat een nieuwe fluïde laag onder de bestaande institutionele structuren in de samenleving, waarin groepen mensen op autonome en informele wijze en als “vertrouwde onbekenden” (tijdelijke) betrokkenheid rondom een onderwerp, situatie of probleem met elkaar delen en tot gezamenlijke actie en innovatie kunnen komen. 25-06-13
  • Web 2.0 is de term om de ingrijpende veranderingen van het World Wide Web aan het einde van het vorige millennium te omschrijven. Het web was niet langer een top-down gecontroleerde informatiebron, waar gebruikers wel konden lezen, maar niets konden toevoegen (Web 1.0). Op een Web 2.0 website kunnen gebruikers niet alleen lezen, maar ook reageren, zelf inhoud genereren en met elkaar in contact komen. Het is lastig om het begrip ‘sociale media’ scherp te definiëren. Bovendien spelen veel van de mechanismen en effecten die we in dit boek noemen niet alleen bij wat men typisch als voorbeelden van sociale media zou noemen: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google+ en wiki’s. Ook e-mail, conventionele websites, tv en radio en andere media dragen bij aan de nieuwe manier van communiceren en samenwerken. Maar zijn blogs en YouTube ook voorbeelden van sociale media in de enge zin? Een precieze afbakening is niet zo belangrijk. Waar het om gaat, is dat er op het internet een verzameling van hulpmiddelen ontstaat die bijdragen aan de vorming van sociale netwerken in alle geledingen van de maatschappij. Daarom spreken we hier van het ‘ sociale web’. Voortbouwend op de definities van Frissen (2008) en van Berlo (2008), zien we de volgende kenmerken als meest vernieuwend en onderscheidend voor dat sociale web: Er is sociale interactie, er ontstaan groepen of gemeenschappen. Gebruikers genereren content. Bestaande content kan worden aangepast. Iedereen kan in principe deelnemen. Gebaseerd op menselijke netwerken, horizontaal en zelforganiserend 25-06-13
  • Bij crowdsourcing worden kennis, informatie, handelingen of hulpbronnen als locatie en rekenkracht van computers van een grote groep losse onafhankelijke individuen gebruikt om bepaalde situaties inzichtelijk te maken, diensten te verlenen of problemen op te lossen. Deze groep mensen heeft verder geen beslissende invloed op het proces. Bij co-creatie participeert de betreffende groep mensen wel in het creatie- of besluitvormingsproces. Mensen en organisaties werken samen om problemen op te lossen of vraagstukken op te pakken. Bij zelforganisatie ontstaan ad hoc-structuren en processen die passen bij een bepaalde taak of opdracht en die fluïde of adaptief qua samenstelling of vorm zijn. Gezamenlijk beslist de groep over een bepaalde opgave. 25-06-13
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  • How do social interactions, exchanges and cooperation between (groups of) people arise and develop through social media? Which forms of social capital arise through social media and how are these generated and activated for social innovation? How can policymakers respond to these online social networks and their social capital in order to support social innovation? For this research we will use a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. An analytical framework will be built upon theory on social capital (e.g. Putnam, Nahapiet & Ghoshan, Lin), bonding processes (e.g. Jarzabkowsky, Cote & Healy, Woolcock), activating weak en strong ties to gather and exchange information and other resources (e.g. Granovetter, Lin) and the role of opinion leaders (Roch). The collection of data will take place by combining several methods: 1) literature study on the role and impact of the Internet and social media on governance, and on its impact for social innovation in specific, 2) interviews with cases on the social web, and 3) observation and analysis of the interaction and exchange on these online social networks.
  • How did the network develop in time? Bonding within the existing network Briding to other communities Linking to other institutes Who are the influencers?
  • How did the network develop in time? Bonding within the existing network Briding to other communities Linking to other institutes Who are the influencers?
  • How did the network develop in time? Bonding within the existing network Briding to other communities Linking to other institutes Who are the influencers?
  • How do social interactions, exchanges and cooperation between (groups of) people arise and develop through social media? Which forms of social capital arise through social media and how are these generated and activated for social innovation? How can policymakers respond to these online social networks and their social capital in order to support social innovation? For this research we will use a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. An analytical framework will be built upon theory on social capital (e.g. Putnam, Nahapiet & Ghoshan, Lin), bonding processes (e.g. Jarzabkowsky, Cote & Healy, Woolcock), activating weak en strong ties to gather and exchange information and other resources (e.g. Granovetter, Lin) and the role of opinion leaders (Roch). The collection of data will take place by combining several methods: 1) literature study on the role and impact of the Internet and social media on governance, and on its impact for social innovation in specific, 2) interviews with cases on the social web, and 3) observation and analysis of the interaction and exchange on these online social networks.
  • How do social interactions, exchanges and cooperation between (groups of) people arise and develop through social media? Which forms of social capital arise through social media and how are these generated and activated for social innovation? How can policymakers respond to these online social networks and their social capital in order to support social innovation? For this research we will use a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. An analytical framework will be built upon theory on social capital (e.g. Putnam, Nahapiet & Ghoshan, Lin), bonding processes (e.g. Jarzabkowsky, Cote & Healy, Woolcock), activating weak en strong ties to gather and exchange information and other resources (e.g. Granovetter, Lin) and the role of opinion leaders (Roch). The collection of data will take place by combining several methods: 1) literature study on the role and impact of the Internet and social media on governance, and on its impact for social innovation in specific, 2) interviews with cases on the social web, and 3) observation and analysis of the interaction and exchange on these online social networks.
  • How do social interactions, exchanges and cooperation between (groups of) people arise and develop through social media? Which forms of social capital arise through social media and how are these generated and activated for social innovation? How can policymakers respond to these online social networks and their social capital in order to support social innovation? For this research we will use a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. An analytical framework will be built upon theory on social capital (e.g. Putnam, Nahapiet & Ghoshan, Lin), bonding processes (e.g. Jarzabkowsky, Cote & Healy, Woolcock), activating weak en strong ties to gather and exchange information and other resources (e.g. Granovetter, Lin) and the role of opinion leaders (Roch). The collection of data will take place by combining several methods: 1) literature study on the role and impact of the Internet and social media on governance, and on its impact for social innovation in specific, 2) interviews with cases on the social web, and 3) observation and analysis of the interaction and exchange on these online social networks.
  • How do social interactions, exchanges and cooperation between (groups of) people arise and develop through social media? Which forms of social capital arise through social media and how are these generated and activated for social innovation? How can policymakers respond to these online social networks and their social capital in order to support social innovation? For this research we will use a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. An analytical framework will be built upon theory on social capital (e.g. Putnam, Nahapiet & Ghoshan, Lin), bonding processes (e.g. Jarzabkowsky, Cote & Healy, Woolcock), activating weak en strong ties to gather and exchange information and other resources (e.g. Granovetter, Lin) and the role of opinion leaders (Roch). The collection of data will take place by combining several methods: 1) literature study on the role and impact of the Internet and social media on governance, and on its impact for social innovation in specific, 2) interviews with cases on the social web, and 3) observation and analysis of the interaction and exchange on these online social networks.
  • How do social interactions, exchanges and cooperation between (groups of) people arise and develop through social media? Which forms of social capital arise through social media and how are these generated and activated for social innovation? How can policymakers respond to these online social networks and their social capital in order to support social innovation? For this research we will use a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. An analytical framework will be built upon theory on social capital (e.g. Putnam, Nahapiet & Ghoshan, Lin), bonding processes (e.g. Jarzabkowsky, Cote & Healy, Woolcock), activating weak en strong ties to gather and exchange information and other resources (e.g. Granovetter, Lin) and the role of opinion leaders (Roch). The collection of data will take place by combining several methods: 1) literature study on the role and impact of the Internet and social media on governance, and on its impact for social innovation in specific, 2) interviews with cases on the social web, and 3) observation and analysis of the interaction and exchange on these online social networks.
  • Common Research Ground in Social Innovation - DIY Initiatives - IADIS 2013 PRAAG

    1. 1. Common Research Ground in Social Innovation DIY initiatives
    2. 2. index     Cases Introduction Groups What’s next
    3. 3. Case ‘Wasteland’
    4. 4. Case: Wasteland 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Can we do it ourselves....? Civil initiative architects, entrepreneurs: LinkedIN group: plea for interactive map to match Supply and Demand Network: inofficial map Municipality of A’dam: open source data: Yes , Official interactive map of wasteland We Can!
    5. 5. Case ‘Wasteland’
    6. 6. Case: Project X Haren
    7. 7. Case: Project X Haren – key turning points 1. 2. 3. 4. Private party is made public, due to incorrect Facebook marking Regular media enhance attention, “explosion” on social media Municipality safety approach: visitors as soccer hooligans, police charges E.g. party at Sylt (Germany), public search missing boys at Capelle a/d IJssel (Netherlands)
    8. 8. Case: Thuisafgehaald.nl (Share Your Meal)
    9. 9. Case: Thuisafgehaald.nl (Share Your Meal) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Start as a dream: bringing people together Share meals, homecooking, lowbudget Site online March 2012, Dutch talkshow In 1 year, 75.000 meals, 6.000 cooks, 34.000 visitors Facebook pages, local ambassadors Extensions – international, e.g. France DIY and growth, identity of many Reputation at stake, food safety, legal permits
    10. 10. Social innovation What is social innovation? People + societal challenge => innovative social processes = enhance the quality of life & social cohesion
    11. 11. Social innovation perspectives ‘Policy’ ‘Participatory strategy’ ‘Inclusive society’ Governmental discourse
    12. 12. Social innovation perspectives ‘community activation’ ‘creating social cohesion’ ‘social entreprises’ Entrepreneurial discourse
    13. 13. Social innovation perspectives ‘human interaction’ ‘exchange of ideas’ ‘Emergence phase’ Civil initiatitve discours
    14. 14. Network society ‘Rhizome’
    15. 15. ‘Here comes everybody: the power of organizing without organizations’ (Clay Shirky 2008)
    16. 16. The sociale web => doing & action Democratization Participation Mobilization Dialogue Self organization Social interaction Activism Everybody can participate
    17. 17. Societal organisation mechanisms  Social media stimulates organisations forms based on collectivity:     crowdsourcing Social movements/ platforms Co-creation Civil initiatives
    18. 18. Ownership Societal organization mechanisms Social movements/ platforms Crowdsourcing / Crowdfunding Joint action
    19. 19. Ownership Societal organization mechanisms Crowdsourcing / Crowdfunding Joint action
    20. 20. Ownership Societal organization mechanisms Civil initiative/ DIY Social movements/ platforms Co-creation Crowdsourcing / Crowdfunding Joint action
    21. 21. Ownership Societal organization mechanisms Social movements/ platforms Co-creation Crowdsourcing / Crowdfunding Joint action
    22. 22. Ownership Societal organization mechanisms Civil initiative/ DIY Social movements/ platforms Co-creation Crowdsourcing / Crowdfunding Joint action
    23. 23. Ownership Societal organization mechanisms Civil initiative DIY Social movements/ platforms Co-creation Crowdsourcing / Crowdfunding Joint action
    24. 24. Joint Research perspective Institutional impact Start-up Organisation Business models DIY Network development Entrepreneurship Legal impact Societal Value creation
    25. 25. Network development casus Wasteland How do social interactions arise and develop on and offline?  Which forms of social networks arise on and offline? 
    26. 26. Social network analysis
    27. 27. Semantic webanalysis “Gardening ?” “Temporary Use?” “Too complicated” “Not in my backyard
    28. 28. Semantic webanalysis: Sentiments analysis “Gardening ?” “a Party?” “No Party !!” “Too complicated” “Not in my backyard !!”
    29. 29. Qualitative networkanalysis (offline) 
    30. 30. Spatial network analysis Our Backyard?
    31. 31. Workshop Bridging & Linking    Who are you? Willing to brainstorm on DIY research? What can you contribute?  Knowledge  methodology  network
    32. 32. 1. Temporary use: What is the trigger? Desperate needs or waste lands? 2. Collective -> Private -> Shared 3. Grass root initiatives -> • crowd sourcing in order to reach a critical mass • crowd sourcing in order to promote distributed thinking • crowd sourcing in order to allow evolution instead of competition 4. People + societal challenge => innovative social processes (Is social cohesion the source or the object mainly?) 5. Joint Research: At what moment do we want to formalize current societal innovations? Will it help us to promote it even further? 6. Does network analysis additional evidence?
    33. 33. Market Change in AD industry: old Corporate Products/ Services Conquest Agency Colonization T Radio V Paper ↓ Creative ↓ Limited Media Channel Traditional Media Consumptio X A few groups monopolize limited resource Propaganda n Silent Consumers Limited function
    34. 34. Market Change in AD industry: new Corporate Products/ Services Consciousness Agency ↓ Communication Internet Interactive Relationship Creator Unlimited Interactive Channel Central role to support diversified communication ↓ Traditional Media Connection Buzz Buzz Buzz Buzz Powered Consumer Less function

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