Itil overview

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  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. ITIL stands for the “Information Technology Infrastructure Library”. Developed by the CCTA (Central Computer and Telecommunications Agency) in the late 80’s. ITIL has become the de facto standard in Service Management. It is public domain. Recent refresh, with companies within private sector involved in the development of material. CCTA now OGC (Office of Government Commerce) part of HM Treasury – authority for best practices within Government. Underpins ISO 9000 quality standards, considered a fast path toward quality certification. ITIL stands for the “Information Technology Infrastructure Library”. The fact that it is referred to as a “library” relates to the fact that the information and guidance surrounding the implementation of each process in an organization can be found in books. At present, there are approximately 46 books within the library – each covering a different topic on IT Service Management. Within the Essentials course, 10 of these books will be covered in detail. However, because the ITIL framework is holistic, it is impossible to discuss a process without mentioning other related processes. This is demonstrated in each of the books, where frequent reference is made to other books within the library when further guidance and information may be required.
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. ITIL Certification Management Board (ICMB) which comprises OGC, itSMF International and the two existing Examinations Institutes: EXIN and ISEB.
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Animation Wheel is present at start up 1 st click = Service Strategy 2 nd click = Service Design 3 rd click = Service Transition 4 th click = Service Operation 5 th click = Continual Service Improvement
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • © Global Knowledge Training LLC Course Title
  • Itil overview

    1. 1. The ITIL Service Management Lifecycle January 18, 2013 Presented by Jim Wright Independent Training Consultant IT Service Management – ITIL Overview 1
    2. 2. What Is ITIL?  ITIL is an integrated best practice for the Service Lifecycle Management of IT enabled services  The de-facto standard in IT Service Management  A framework developed by the United Kingdom’s ‘Cabinet Office’ captured in a series of books<Overview> 2
    3. 3. ITIL Origins & Evolution  Late 1980s:  UK government project started  Cabinet Office involved in development plus practitioner and consulting organizations  Organizations outside of government became interested  Version 1 (V1) books published  Early 1990s:  V1 library completed  Late 1990s:  Generally accepted as the de-facto standard for IT Service Management worldwide  Introduced ITIL to North America (1997)  Version 2 (V2) revision of ITIL books initiated<Overview> 3
    4. 4. ITIL Origins & Evolution  2000-2007:  V2 books introduced – process based  ITIL based international standard ISO 20000  Influence of Sarbanes-Oxley and other legislation  ITSM vendor community support of ITIL and introduction of integrated tools  The beginnings of broad adoption of ITIL globally  Early Industry Adopters  Financial Government Utilities Medical  2005:  Work on Version 3 (V3) is begun<Overview> 4
    5. 5. Organizations Involved  ITIL V3 Refresh project team 2005 to 2007  APM Group awarded Certification Scheme  TSO Publisher  Examination Institutes (EI) all use common V3 Exams  Authorized Training Organizations (ATOs)  ITIL 2011 - Update<Overview> 5
    6. 6. ITIL V3 Library Service Service Design Service Service Operation Continual Strategy Transition Service Improvement The Official Introduction To The ITIL® Service Lifecycle + Complementary Guidance<Overview> 6
    7. 7. The Service Lifecycle © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 7
    8. 8. Why Are Companies Adopting ITIL?  Deliver value for customers through services  Integrate business and service strategies  Monitor, measure, and optimize service provider performance  Manage the IT investment and budget  Manage risk  Manage knowledge  Change organizational culture  Improve the relationship with customers  Optimize and reduce costs<Overview> 8
    9. 9. ITIL Focus - Key Concepts  Service and Service Management  A means of delivering value by facilitating outcomes the customer wants achieve  A set of organizational capabilities providing value to customers in the form of services  Processes  A structured sets of activities designed to accomplish specific objectives  Functions  Teams or self-contained groups of people using skills and tools to perform activities and tasks<Overview> 9
    10. 10. Types of IT Services © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 10
    11. 11. The Value of a Service Utility (Performance): Functionality offered by a service to meet a particular need or achieve a particular outcome Warranty (Reliability): Assurance that a service will meet its agreed requirements © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 11
    12. 12. Service and Customer Assets  Types of assets:  Resources  Capabilities  Customer assets  Service assets © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 12
    13. 13. Service Assets  Resources  Tangible assets: financial capital, infrastructure, applications, information and people (number of people)  Capabilities  Intangible assets: management, organization, processes, knowledge, and people (skills and experiences)<Overview> 13
    14. 14. Process Models © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 14
    15. 15. Functions © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 15
    16. 16. Generic Roles in Service Management Process roles—apply to each process: ► Process owner ► Process manager ► Process practitioner Service roles—apply to each service: ► Service owner<Overview> 16
    17. 17. ITIL® Core Service Lifecycle Service Strategy: Model and plan services that have utility and warranty ITIL Information Technology Infrastructure Library<Overview> 17
    18. 18. ITIL® Core Service Lifecycle Service Design: Design high quality, cost effective, consistent services ITIL Information Technology Infrastructure Library<Overview> 18
    19. 19. ITIL® Core Service Lifecycle Service Transition: Transition new and changed services into operations ITIL Information Technology Infrastructure Library<Overview> 19
    20. 20. ITIL® Core Service Lifecycle Service Operation: Achieve effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery of services ITIL Information Technology Infrastructure Library<Overview> 20
    21. 21. ITIL® Core Service Lifecycle Continual Service Improvement: Continue to create and improve value through improvements and enhancements ITIL Information Technology Infrastructure Library<Overview> 21
    22. 22. Service Strategy How to design, develop, and implement service management as a strategic asset<Overview> 22
    23. 23. Service Strategy Lifecycle Stage Inputs: Feedback and requirements for strategies and plans Outputs: Vision, mission, goals, objectives, policies, service charters © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 23
    24. 24. Lifecycle Processes SERVICE STRATEGY • Business Relationship Management • Service Strategy Generation • Service Portfolio Management • Financial Management • Demand Management<Overview> 24
    25. 25. Service Strategy Processes  Business Relationship Management  Establish & maintain relationship between Service Provider & Customer  Identify Customer needs & ensure Service Provider can meet those needs over time  Strategy Generation  Define the market, develop the offerings, develop the strategic assets and prepare for execution<Overview> 25
    26. 26. Service Strategy Processes  Service Portfolio Management  Ensure clear definition of services linked to Business outcomes  Ensure Service Provider offers right mix of services  Track investment in services throughout service lifecycle to ensure desired returns  Financial Management  Secure appropriate funding to design, develop, and deliver services that meet the strategy of the organization, while balancing cost & value<Overview> 26
    27. 27. Service Strategy Processes  Demand Management  To understand, anticipate & influence customer demand for services & to work with capacity management to ensure the service provider has capacity to meet this demand<Overview> 27
    28. 28. Service Design Design and development of new or changed services and service management processes.<Overview> 28
    29. 29. Service Design Lifecycle Stage Inputs: Vision, mission, goals, objectives, policies Major output: SDP (service design package) © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 29
    30. 30. Lifecycle Processes SERVICE STRATEGY SERVICE DESIGN • Business Relationship • Design Coordination Management • Service Catalog Management • Service Strategy Generation • Service Level Management • Service Portfolio Management • Supplier Management • Financial Management • Capacity Management • Demand Management • Availability Management • IT Service Continuity Management • Information Security Management<Overview> 30
    31. 31. Service Design Processes  Design Coordination  To provide a single point of coordination and control for the processes and activities within service design to produce quality SDPs as agreed  Service Catalog Management  To provide a single source of consistent information on all of the agreed services, and ensure that it is widely available to those who are approved to access it<Overview> 31
    32. 32. Service Design Processes  Service Level Management  To ensure all current and planned IT services are delivered to agreed targets and to establish a constant cycle of negotiating, agreeing, monitoring, reporting, and reviewing service level performance  Agreements  Service Level Agreements (SLAs) • Between IT Service Provider & Business/Customer  Operational Level Agreements (OLAs) • Between Internal support groups & various parts of IT<Overview> 32
    33. 33. Service Design Processes  Supplier Management  To obtain value for money from suppliers and to ensure that suppliers perform to the targets, terms & conditions contained within their contracts  Agreements  Underpinning Contracts (UCs) • Between External Suppliers & IT Service Provider • Legally binding<Overview> 33
    34. 34. Service Design Processes  Capacity Management  To ensure that the level of capacity delivered matches the agreed capacity needs of the business  Availability Management  To ensure that the level of availability delivered matches the agreed availability needs of the business<Overview> 34
    35. 35. Service Design Processes  IT Service Continuity Management  To ensure that the service provider can deliver minimum agreed business continuity-related service levels  IT Security Management  To align IT security with business security and ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability of assets, information, data, and IT services<Overview> 35
    36. 36. Service Transition Guidance for the development and improvement of capabilities necessary to transition new and/or changed services into operations<Overview> 36
    37. 37. Service Transition Lifecycle Stage Major inputs: SDP (service design package), RFCs (requests for change) Major outputs: New or changed services, early life support © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 37
    38. 38. Lifecycle Processes SERVICE STRATEGY SERVICE DESIGN • Business Relationship • Design Coordination Management • Service Catalog Management • Service Strategy Generation • Service Level Management • Service Portfolio Management • Supplier Management • Financial Management • Capacity Management • Demand Management • Availability Management • IT Service Continuity Management • Information Security Management SERVICE TRANSITION • Transition Planning and Support • Change Management • Service Asset & Configuration Management • Release & Deployment Management • Service Validation & Testing • Change Evaluation • Knowledge Management<Overview> 38
    39. 39. Service Transition Processes  Transition Planning and Support  To provide overall planning for service transitions  To coordinate resources that service transitions require  Change Management  To ensure that authorized changes are prioritized, planned, tested, implemented, documented & reviewed in a controlled manner  To minimize the disruption to the environment & therefore to services<Overview> 39
    40. 40. Service Transition Processes  Service Asset & Configuration Management (SACM)  To ensure accurate & reliable information about service assets exists & is available when needed (CMDB & CMS)  Release & Deployment Management  To plan, schedule & control the build, test & deployment of releases  Service Validation & Testing  To provide objective evidence that the new or changed service will support the customer’s business & stakeholder requirements<Overview> 40
    41. 41. Service Transition Processes  Change Evaluation  to provide a consistent and standardized means of determining the performance of a service change  Knowledge Management  To ensure that the right information is delivered to the appropriate place or competent person at the right time to enable informed decisions<Overview> 41
    42. 42. Service Operation Guidance on achieving effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery and support of services. Value is achieved for the customer.<Overview> 42
    43. 43. Service Operation Lifecycle Stage Inputs from transition: Deployed releases, early life support Outputs to CSI: Service performance reports © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 43
    44. 44. Lifecycle Processes SERVICE STRATEGY SERVICE DESIGN • Business Relationship • Design Coordination Management • Service Catalog Management • Service Strategy Generation • Service Level Management • Service Portfolio Management • Supplier Management • Financial Management • Capacity Management • Demand Management • Availability Management • IT Service Continuity Management • Information Security Management SERVICE TRANSITION • Transition Planning and Support SERVICE OPERATION • Change Management • Event Management • Service Asset & Configuration • Incident Management Management • Request Fulfillment • Release & Deployment • Problem Management Management • Access Management • Service Validation & Testing • Change Evaluation • Knowledge Management<Overview> 44
    45. 45. Service Operation Processes  Event Management  Activities to detect events, make sense of them, & determine appropriate response  Incident Management  To restore normal service as quickly as possible & minimize adverse impact on business  Request Fulfillment  To manage the lifecycle of requests from users<Overview> 45
    46. 46. Service Operation Processes  Problem Management  To manage the lifecycle of all problems from identification to removal & minimize the adverse impact of incidents and problems  Access Management  To provide the right for users to use a service  To execute policies & actions defined in Information Security Management<Overview> 46
    47. 47. Functions © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 47
    48. 48. Service Desk Function  Functional unit - dedicated staff  SPOC for all users - day-to-day  Communication point for users  Coordination point for several IT functions & processes  Handle incidents, service requests, general questions, potentially some RFC categories  Vitally important function—value should not be underestimated:  Good service desk can compensate for deficiencies elsewhere.  Poor service desk can give bad impression of an otherwise effective IT organization.  Staff needs to have the right mix of skills.<Overview> 5-52
    49. 49. Objectives of the Service Desk  Return service operation to normal state for users as quickly as possible:  Incidents  Specific responsibilities:  Logging incidents & service requests  Providing first-line response & diagnosis  Resolving incidents / requests at first contact when possible  Escalating incidents / requests they cannot resolve within agreed timeframes  Keeping users informed of incident / request progress  Closing all resolved incidents / requests  Conducting customer / user satisfaction surveys  Communicating with users  Handling general inquiries<Overview> 5-54
    50. 50. Justification of the Role of Service Desk • Improved customer service and satisfaction levels • Increased accessibility to information through SPOC • Faster turnaround and quality of requests • Improved teamwork and communication • Reduced business impact of service disruptions • Improved usage of IT support resources • Increased productivity of users • Better management of information • Increased levels of support due to adequate staffing and skill levels at first line<Overview> 5-53
    51. 51. Continual Service Improvement Sustains the creation and maintenance of customer value through better design, introduction, and operation of services<Overview> 51
    52. 52. CSI Lifecycle Stage Major inputs: Service performance reports Major output: SIPs (service improvement plans) © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 52
    53. 53. 3 Types of CSI Metrics  Technology metrics measure components and applications:  Server or system availability  Application performance  Process metrics measure the overall health of a process:  Quality  Performance  Value  Compliance  Service metrics measure the end-to-end performance of the service:  Service availability (end-to-end)  Transaction response time<Overview> 53
    54. 54. Lifecycle Processes SERVICE STRATEGY SERVICE DESIGN • Service Strategy • Design Coordination • Service Portfolio • Service Catalog Management Management • Service Level Management • Financial Management • Supplier Management • Demand Management • Capacity Management • Availability Management • IT Service Continuity Management • Information Security Management SERVICE TRANSITION • Transition Planning and Support SERVICE OPERATION • Change Management • Event Management • Service Asset & Configuration • Incident Management Management • Request Fulfillment • Release & Deployment • Problem Management Management • Access Management CONTINUAL SERVICE • Service Validation IMPROVEMENT • Evaluation • Seven Step Improvement • Knowledge Management<Overview> 54
    55. 55. Continual Service Improvement  Seven-Step Improvement Process  To define & manage the steps needed to identify, define, gather, process, analyze, present & implement improvements  CSI Approach  To provide questions to be answered from both a business & IT perspective for Improvement initiatives<Overview> 55
    56. 56. Seven-Step Improvement Process © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 56
    57. 57. CSI Approach © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 57
    58. 58. Deming Cycle © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 58
    59. 59. The Service Lifecycle - Integration © Crown copyright 2011. Reproduced under license from the Cabinet Office.<Overview> 59
    60. 60. Lessons Learned  Top down support/middle management and process owner buy-in  ITIL is not a panacea – a catalyst not a religion  Don’t implement ITIL – develop and implement your own processes  Organizational change – changing norms of behavior and values (culture) / some won’t want to change, and will resist  Target a limited set of readily achievable objectives  Start where there are quick wins to be had – Incident Management, Problem Management and Change Management (link to Release and Deployment Management & SACM)  Don’t stop at the Help Desk / Service Desk  Multi-year initiative  The need for tools – one or many/tool process and data integration  Measurements – is progress being made?  CMDB (top priority in most surveys) and service concepts are core  Training IT and the business  ITIL consultants – don’t let them do it for you<Overview> 60

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