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Final presentation 52nd International session For Young Participants
 

Final presentation 52nd International session For Young Participants

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Final presentation - 52nd International session For Young Participants

Final presentation - 52nd International session For Young Participants
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Olympic Movement
International Olympic Academy
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    Final presentation 52nd International session For Young Participants Final presentation 52nd International session For Young Participants Presentation Transcript

    • THE 52nd INTERNATIONAL SESSION FOR YOUNG PARTICIPANTS 16-30 June 2012“The Enhancement of the Principles of Democracy within the Olympic Movement” ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • AGENDA The Olympic Movement Conferences / Lectures / Group Discussions The International Olympic How to reinforce Olympic Academy (IOA) Culture The 52nd International Session for Young Participants Sport & Social Activities The Young French Participants Memories from the Session ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012 2
    • THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT 3 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • OLYMPISM & OLYMPIC VALUES "Olympism is a philosophy of life, exalting and combining in a balanced whole the qualities of body, will and mind. Blending sport with culture and education, Olympism seeks to create a way of life based on the joy found in effort, the educational value of good example and respect for universal fundamental ethical principles." Olympic Charter, Fundamental principles, paragraph 2 EXCELLENCE "Striving for excellence in all that we do" RESPECT "Respecting ourselves, each other and the rules" FRIENDSHIP "Living in friendship and peace“ 4 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • OLYMPIC MOVEMENT The Olympic Movement comprises :  The IOC : Supreme authority of the Olympic Movement (Created on 23 June 1894)  The National Olympic Committees (NOCs) :  Develop, promote and protect the Olympic Movement in their respective countries.  Select and designate the city which may apply to organize Olympic Games in their respective countries.  Send athletes to the Games.  The International Sports Federations (IFs) :  International non-governmental organizations which administering one or several sports at world level and encompassing organizations administering such sports at national levelThe goal of the Olympic Movement is tocontribute to building a peaceful and betterworld by educating youth through sport  International Olympic Academy (IOA) and the National Olympicpracticed without discrimination or any kind, Academies (NOA)in a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair  The athletesplay.  The Organizing Committees for the Olympic Games (OCOGs)  Ensure the regular celebration of the Olympic Games  Support all affiliated member organizations of the Olympic Movement  Encourage the promotion of the Olympic values. Its Activities  Promoting sport and competitions through the intermediary of national and international sports institutions worldwide.  Cooperation with public and private organizations to place sport at the service of mankind.  Assistance to develop "Sport for All".  Advancement of women in sport at all levels and in all structures, with a view to achieving equality between men and women. Help in the development of sport for all.  Opposition to all forms of commercial exploitation of sport and athletes.  The fight against doping.  Promoting sports ethics and fair play.  Raising awareness of environmental problems.  Financial and educational support for developing countries through the IOC institution Olympic Solidarity. ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC ACADEMY 6 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • HISTORY OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC ACADEMY 1927 : Pierre de Coubertin was invited by the Greek government to Olympia, to attend the unveiling of a commemorative stele created in order to honour his actions to revive the Olympic Games. He discussed the need for an academic centre for the study of the Olympic Movement and its trends with his friend Ioannis CHRYSAFIS, who headed the Department of Physical Education at the University of Athens. Objectives : To set up an academic centre modeled after the ancient Gymnasium, to lay down the foundations for the educational value of sport by carrying out studies and organizing classical games. 1939 : The IOC placed the IOA under its auspices during the 39th IOC Session in London. 14th of June 1961 : The International Olympic Academy was officially inaugurated and the first annual International Session for Young participants was held. In addition, the IOA received the Bonacosa Award. 1994 : New conference halls, a library and administration building are added to the IOA facilities in Ancient Olympia. 2003 : The IOA becomes an autonomous legal entity of private law. “Those who serve the Olympic Idea share in the most beautiful cultural heritage of the people; i.e. in classical education, born in a country to become the property of the world. Greece wishes simply to remain its faithful servant.” Nikolaos NISSIOTIS President of the IOA (1977-1986) “The IOA constitutes the intellectual expression of the Olympic Movement, which represents one of the finest aspects of the universal intellectual tradition.” Lambis NIKOLAOU Vice-President of the IOC (2005 -2009) Member of the IOC (1986 - ) President of the HOC (1985-1992, 1997-2004) ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC ACADEMY Its Mission  To function as an International Academic Centre for Olympic Studies, Education and Research  To act as an International Forum for free expression and exchange of ideas among the Olympic Family, intellectuals, scientists, athletes, sport administrators, artists and the youth of the world  To bring together people from all over the world, in a spirit of friendship and cooperation  To motivate people to use the experience and knowledge gained in the IOA productively, in promoting the Olympic Ideals in their respective countries  To serve and promote the Ideals and principles of the Olympic Movement  To cooperate with and assist the National Olympic Academies and any other institutions devoted to Olympic Education  To further explore and enhance the contribution of Olympism to humanity Thanks to the IOA, 143 national academies were created Its Vision  To explore and enhance the contribution of Olympism to humanity in the 21st Century “Defending and promoting the Olympic Ideal from both the sporting and the cultural point of view must be a task that we all share.” - J. ROGGE, President of the IOC Prof. Konstantinos GEORGIADIS - IOA Honorary Dean Dr Isidoros KOUVELOS – Pdt IOA Prof. Dionyssis Gangas – IOA Director ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC ACADEMY Sport fields, administrative offices, 116 rooms, 1 restaurant A modern conference center, a library ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • IOA EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES  International Session for YOUNG PARTICIPANTS  International Seminar on Olympic Studies for POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS  International Session for DIRECTORS OF NOAS  Joint International Session for PRESIDENTS OR DIRECTORS OF NOAS AND OFFICIALS OF NOCS  International Session for EDUCATORS AND OFFICIALS OF HIGHER INSTITUTES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION  International Session for SPORTS JOURNALISTS  International Session for OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS  MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMME “Olympic Studies, Olympic Education, Organization and Management of Olympic Events.”  Special Sessions for INSTITUTIONS RELATED WITH OLYMPISM : National Olympic Committees, National Olympic Academies, International Sport Federation, F.I.E.P, Sport Medical Societies, Unions of Coaches, Referees, Sports Administrators, …  Special Sessions for INSTITUTIONS INDIRECTLY RELATED WITH OLYMPISM (C.I.S.M, Teachers, …) aiming to promote the Olympic Ideal  EDUCATIONAL VISITS OF GROUPS from various institutions (Universities, Graduate School, schools, Sports Clubs)  VISIT OF RESEARCHERS OF OLYMPIC SUBJECTS  CONFERENCE OF SPORTS SCIENCE  PIONEER IN OLYMPIC EDUCATION ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • IOA PUBLICATIONS To promote IOA scientific research:  Publication of each session  1995:  as part of the Olympic Education Program, it has published a textbook  began to inventory its records and those of the Hellenic National Committee  In cooperation with Olympic Solidarity : IOA has published three books ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • THE IOA AND THE YOUTH OLYMPIC GAMES ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • THE 52nd INTERNATIONAL SESSION FOR YOUNGPARTICIPANTS 14 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • INTERNATIONAL SESSION FOR YOUNG PARTICIPANTS  An international forum for free expression and exchange of ideas  Multicultural environment Objectives :  To educate, to motivate young people to use their experiences and knowledge gained from the Session productively in promoting the Olympics Ideals and educating others in their own countries  2 weeks annual session (June or July)  Students, Olympic athletes, people active in sport, teaching or active in their respective NOCs or NOAs  To apply for the Session : http://www.ioa.org.gr/fr/topic/young_participants  Main topic : OLYMPISM  Extracurricular activities :  Lectures, question and answer sessions, group  Sports tournaments discussion meetings, presentations by the  Art, song, dance, poetry and literature participants, fields trips to archaeological sites and workshops museums, and research in the library  Social evenings  The conclusions of the group discussions form a consolidated report. The IOA publishes the proceedings of each session ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • 26 COORDINATORS / 18 COUNTRIES Hallo Hallo Hallo Tere здраво Hallo здравей Hallo Olá γειά σου Hallo Bonjour Olá Hallo Hallo ‫שלום‬ Ayubowa 你好 n Master’s Degree Programme "Olympic Studies, Olympic Education, Organization and Management of Olympic Events" ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • 180 PARTICIPANTS FROM 100 COUNTRIES ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • DIFFERENT PROFILES / CULTURES Marie-Hélène CAYER Coordinator, Marketing & Communication Paralympics Canada Sandra MJÖLL JÓNSDÓTTIR BUCH Taekwondo communication & promotion Camille RICAUD French University Sports Federation Justin O’CONNELL Coordinator of Operations, Olympic Training CenterSports Nobukatsu SUGINAMI Iris GONZALEZ GORDILLO Judo Federation Student Xiaoying WANG Ornit SHWARTZ. China NOC Former basketball player Maitreyee BANERJEE Ximena MATA Rowing / NOA Municipal Institute for Sports Ouma Kaltoum GUINDO Student / Basketball player Sebastian AMARILLA Sara CARRIGAN Student Gold Medals - OG Athens 2004 Sara MC’INTOSH 2 medals Horse jumping YOG Singapore Moss BURMESTER ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012 Retire Swimmer
    • THE YOUNG FRENCH PARTICIPANTS 2 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012 0
    • YOUNG FRENCH PARTICIPANTS Ms Marjory MALBERT – 31 years old 1. Volunteer within the French Federation of Sport in Business (FFSE) 2. Volunteer for the 1st Winter Youth Olympic Games in Innsbruck in 2012 3. Competed in tennis and swimming Paris Lyon Montpellier Ms Marie-Christine PLASSE – 31 years old 1. Departmental Committee Sports Olympic Youth (CDOJ) created to educate youth about the Olympic culture, encouraging them to get involved in their local community, giving them a voice so they can express their desires and implement project 2. Competed in high-jump Pour plus d’informations sur M. Camille RICAUD – 31 years old l’Académie Nationale Olympique 1. Treasurer of the French University Française (Cliquez ici) Sports Federation (FFSU) 2. Competed in boxing ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • OBJECTIVES OF YOUNG PARTICIPANTS IN OLYMPIA  Represent France and NOA within the IOA  Bring ideas, proposals for action  Promote French language : speak French, ask question in French, talk about French culture… AFTER THE SESSION  Make a report / an overview of the Session : feelings, topics covered during the lectures and discussions, reflections and ideas  Participants must present the report to members of NOA  Integrate the “Commission Nationale des Relais d’Olympie” (CNRO) within the French National Olympic Academy (ANOF)  Get involved in the CNRO and ANOF :  Attend meetings regularly (at least in one year, and within 3 years after the session) and / or invest in projects of the said commission This involvement must also be orientated towards the actions of the ANOF. Its activities are organized around two themes:  Legacy ("Memory of the sports world“)  Education (I.e : Olympic Youth Camp) Participation in these activities can be done at different levels (from local to national) and in different forms (represented in the ANOF conferences or sporting values-based, locally to help the development of educational projects, the Olympic organizing camps, to develop educational, etc ...). ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • FRENCH : FIRST OFFICIAL OLYMPIC AND IOC LANGUAGE For each Olympics, the International Olympic Committee advocates the use of three languages: French, English, and language of the host country. Olympic Charter, Article 24: 1. The official languages ​of the IOC are French and English. 2. At all sessions, simultaneous interpretation must be provided in English, French, German, Spanish, Russian and Arabic. 3. In case of discrepancy between the French and the English texts of the Olympic Charter and any other IOC document, the French text shall prevail unless expressly provided otherwise in writing. PIERRE DE COUBERTIN : The founder of the modern Olympics He renovated the Olympic Games « Je souhaite mettre le sport au service du développement harmonieux de lhumanité et contribuer à létablissement dun monde pacifique. » With a population of over 890 million and 220 million French speakers worldwide, the International Organization of La Francophonie (OIF) mission is to embody an active solidarity between the 75 States and governments that compose it (56 members and 19 observers) - more than a third of UN Member States. ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • FRENCH SPEAKERS  Group of 14 persons :  3 French  3 Swiss  2 Guinea  1 Mali  1 Senegal  1 Tunisia  1 Swedish  1 Canadian  1 Romania  Other persons who speak French [Learned at School]  2 Seychelles  2 German  1 Peruvian  2 Greeks  1 Spanish  1 Thai  Other persons who would like to learn and speak French  Namibian, Uruguayan, Korean, Portuguese, Norwegian ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • FRENCH SPEAKERS “INFLUENCERS” Canada Norway Sweden Ukrainia Roumania Germany France Switzerland South Korea Spain Greece Portugal Tunisie Israel Tappei Mali Senegal Thaliand Guinea Peru The Seychelles Namibia Uruguay ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • WAYS TO PROMOTE FRENCH LANGUAGE ? OBSERVATION :  In Olympia, French speakers were a small group (14), about 8% of the participants.  Half of French speakers do not speak English  Spanish and Chinese speakers are getting more numerous  People who work within the Olympic Movement are more sensitive to the French language BASIC POINTS TO SUCCEED IN :  French people should be conscious of their history and legacy  Be proud of their country and their values  French Speaker participants must promote French Language as the main actor ! COMMUNICATION :  We should talk to the French language in a positive way  I.E : By using it in the activities taking place throughout the world  French Culture Education at school is important  The YOUTH OLYMPIC GAMES should be a place to promote French language and the Founder of the modern Olympics : Pierre de Coubertin  FOR SURE, PEOPLE LIKE FRENCH PEOPLE, CULTURE, MUSIC AND LANGUAGE ! ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • CONFERENCES / LECTURES / GROUP DISCUSSIONS 27 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • LECTURES  Prof. Stephen G. MILLER (USA), President of the Society for the Revival of the Nemean Games, Professor Emeritus at the University of Berkeley in California, USA:  “THE ANCIENT OLYMPICS AND THE BIRTH OF DEMOCRATY.”  Prof. Maria BULATOVA (UKR), President of the National Olympic Academy of Ukraine  “WOMEN, SPORT AND DEMOCRATY”  Prof. Dr Mark DYRESON (USA), Professor of Kinesiology and History at the Pennsylvania State University, USA,:  “SPORT, COMMUNITY AND DEMOCRATY AT THE OLYMPIC GAMES”  Dr Constantinos FILIS (GRE), Director of the International Olympic Truce Centre  “THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC TRUCE CENTRE”  Dr Barbara KEYS (AUS), Senior Lecturer in history in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies at the University of Melbourne, Australia:  “OLYMPIC GAMES : SPREADING DEMOCRACY AND OLYMPIC VALUES VERSUS COMMERCIALIZATION”  Prof. Kazuo UCHIUMI (JAP), Professor of Sociology of Sport at the Hiroshima University of Economics, Japan:  “OLYMPIC MOVEMENT, WELFARE, PEACE” ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • LECTURES  Prof. Dr Bruce KIDD (CAN), Professor of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the Universitiy of Toronto, Canada  “ATHLETES RIGHTS: THE EMPOWERMENT OF ATHLETES’ STATUS IN THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT”  Prof. Dr Margaret TALBOT (GBR), President of the International Council of Sport Science and Physical Education (ICSSPE), Berlin, Germany:  “OLYMPIC IDEALS AND DEMOCRACY”  Mr Sam RAMSAMY (RSA), IOC Member, Vice President of FINA, Chairman of the IOC Commission Sport for All, Member of the IOC Executive Board:  OLYMPIC UNIVERSALISM AND APARTHEID ISSUE”  Prof. Dr Gylton B. DA MATTA (USA), Professor at the Sport Exercise Dept. at the University of Northern Colorado, USA:  “THE ROLE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS IN THE DEMOCRATIZATION PROCESS OF SCHOOLS”  Prof. Dr Otmar WEISS (AUT), Head of the Dept. of Sport Sociology, Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Sports Sciences at the University of Vienna, Austria  “(DEMOCRATIC) VALUES AND IDENTITY IN SPORT. TOWARDS THE EFFECT OF THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT ON SPORT IDENTITIES.” ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • THE DEMOCRACY What is Democracy ?  δημοκρατία (dēmokratía) "rule of the people",  δῆμος (dēmos) "people“  -κρατία (-kratia) "rule" Democracy as a system of governance must allow broad representation and include the largest possible number of people and opinions that would feed into the functioning of a just and equitable society. People can express their opinions, both for freedom of expression and by voting for or against. However, its implementation and interpretation are not so simple DEMOCRACY ISSUES ARE A SENSITIVE SUBJECT  Points of view are different depending on background, interest,…  Often the dilemma is rooted in culture rather than religion.  LONG-TERM WORK AND SENSIBILIZATION ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • THE DEMOCRACY WITHIN THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENTFUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF OLYMPISM The OLYMPIC CHARTER includes, among others, three principles that are essential to the relationship between democracy and the Olympic ideals and the implementation of these ideals 4. THE PRACTICE OF SPORT IS A HUMAN RIGHT. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play. The organization, administration and management of sport must be controlled by independent sports organizations. 5. ANY FORM OF DISCRIMINATION with regard to a country or a person on grounds of race, religion, politics, gender or otherwise is incompatible with belonging to the Olympic Movement. 6. Belonging to the Olympic Movement REQUIRES COMPLIANCE WITH THE OLYMPIC CHARTER AND RECOGNITION BY THE IOC. Principles 4 and 6 are strong positions that support the right of everyone to practice the sport. This principle is reflected in both the ideologies and democratic Olympics Ideals, the leaders of democratic organizations and Olympic fighting for their implementation. ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • WHY SHOULD WE PROMOTE DEMOCRACY WITHIN THEOLYMPIC MOVEMENT ?  Promote fundamental Democratic principles : "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity"  Promote Human Rights  Promote Right to Freedom of Expression  Fight against intolerance, discrimination, racism  Promote Gender equality = “1 men for 1 women”  Promote Right to Information  Promote Right to Defense  Improve social and living conditions  SPORT FOR ALL  SPORT IS AN UNIVESRSAL LANGUAGE ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • DISCUSSION/ISSUES ABOUT DEMOCRACY Women/Men Promote values Avoid Doping Election of the Host Cities Athletes’ rights Is sport the true hope for mankind? Role of people with disabilities Clothing/Apparel to sports Young & Young Education Formation & Athletes Sport decisions Programmes Athletes’ defense : Fair and impartial trial? ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • KEY SUCCESS FACTORS TO SUCCEED IN ENHANCINGDEMOCRATY WITHIN THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT Determine specificities/issues (education, culture…) ALL STAKEHOLDERS SHOULD WORK TOGETHER  Olympic Movement, Athletes  Parents, Field of Education…  Governments  Women / Men / Young  Olympic and Paralympic’ athletes  Young Participants International Olympic Academy  Sponsors ESTABLISH A WORLD STRATEGY AND RELAY IT TO A LOCAL PLACE  More Communication about Olympic Values  Grassroots projects  More representative : Women, Young, Disabled persons… in the top high levels  Ambassadors (i.e: athletes)  Social medias (activation)  Young participants (IOA)  Should play a major role PROMOTE SPORTS AT SCHOOL and its VALUES (Cf. Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon model)  Peace, Friendship, Fair-play, Respect  Learning to know each others and knowing better how to live and work together Promote new events / new sponsorships  I.e : Continue with the growing of the YOUTH OLYMPIC GAMES :  “Be Part Of It”  SENSIBILIZATION, AMBASSADORS, EVENTS… ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • IMPIDEMENTS  Money / “Capitalism” system  Sponsors pressure  Sport mediatization  The Olympic Movement remains a private organization  Issues : to interfere, weight the pros and the cons  Difficult to change attitudes / Fear of changes  Sport is only a tool, as Truce with Peace  Governments/ Sportive institutions ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • HOW TO PROMOTE OLYMPISM ? 36 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • HOW TO REVIVE THE OLYMPICS GAMES AND PROMOTE VALUES Opening Ceremony PANATHENAÏC STADIUM Closing Torch Ceremony Relay OLYMPIA DELPHI STADIUM Swimming Nemean Gala Games NEMEA Track and Field ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • HOW TO REVIVE THE OLYMPICS GAMES AND PROMOTE VALUES Opening Ceremony PANATHENAÏC STADIUM Closing Torch Ceremony Relay OLYMPIA DELPHI STADIUM Swimming Nemea Gala Games NEMEA Track and Field ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • VISITS Welcoming worlds PANATHENAIC STADIUM ATHENS - Καλλιμάρμαρο OLYMPIA STADIUM In ancient times, the stadium was used to host the The stadium was a holy place for the ancient Greeks, as athletic portion of the Panathenaic Games, in honor of this is where sporting activities dedicated to Zeus were held. the Goddess Athena. It is located to the east of the sanctuary of Zeus. It was the Hosted the first modern Olympic Games in 1896. location of many of the sporting events at the Ancient The Panathinaiko is the only major stadium in the world Olympic Games. built entirely of white marble (from Mount Penteli) and one of the oldest stadiums in the world. ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • VISITS Welcoming worlds NEMEE - Νεμέα ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE - DELPHI In Greek mythology, Delphi was the site of the Delphic oracle, the most important oracle in the classical Greek world, and a major site for the worship of the god Apollo Ancient site in the northeastern part of the after he slew the Python, a dragon who lived there and Peloponnese. Formerly part of the territory of protected the navel of the Earth. Cleonae in Argolis, it is today part of the prefecture Apollos sacred precinct in Delphi was a panhellenic of Corinthia. sanctuary, where every four years, starting in 776 BC athletes from all over the Greek world competed in the Pythian Games, one of the four panhellenic (or stephanitic) games, precursors of the Modern Olympics. Delphi was set apart from the other games sites because it hosted the mousikos agon, musical competitions. ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • HOW TO REVIVE THE OLYMPICS GAMES AND PROMOTE VALUES Opening Ceremony Panathenaïc Stadium Closing Torch Ceremony Relay Olympia Delphi Stadium Swimming Nemean Gala Games Nemea Track and Field ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • OPENING AND CLOSING CEREMONIES Welcoming Speech Commemorative Picture – International Olympic Academy – Olympia Commemorative Picture – Hill of PNYX – Athens Commemorative Stele Graduation Pierre de Coubertin ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • OLYMPIC FLAME / TORCH RELAY : June 22 The Olympic Flame is a symbol of the Olympic Games. Commemorating the theft of fire from the Greek god Zeus by Prometheus, its origins lie in ancient Greece, where a fire was kept burning throughout the celebration of the ancient Olympics. The fire was reintroduced at the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, and it has been part of the modern Olympic Games ever since. The Olympic Torch today is ignited several months before the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games at the site of the ancient Olympics in Olympia, Greece. Eleven women, representing the Vestal Virgins, perform a ceremony in which the torch is kindled by the light of the Sun, its rays concentrated by a parabolic mirror. The Olympic Torch Relay ends on the day of the opening ceremony in the central stadium of the Games. The final carrier is often kept unannounced until the last moment, and is usually a sports celebrity of the host country. The final bearer of the torch runs towards the cauldron, often placed at the top of a grand staircase, and then uses the torch to start the flame in the stadium. It is considered a great honor to be asked to light the Olympic Flame. After being lit, the flame continues to burn throughout the Olympics, and is extinguished on the day of the closing ceremony. ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • NEMEAN GAMES : June 23 The Nemean Games were one of the four Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece, and were held at Nemea every two years (or every third). With the Isthmian Games, the Nemean Games were held both the year before and the year after the Olympic Games and the Pythian Games in the third year of the Olympiad cycle. Like the Olympic Games, they were held in honour of Zeus. They were said to have been founded by Heracles after he defeated the Nemean Lion: another myth said that they originated as the funeral games of a child named Opheltes. However, they are known to have existed only since the 6th century BC (from 573 BC, or earlier). The winners received a wreath of wild celery leaves from the city of Argos. THE MODERN NEMEAN GAMES The Society for the Revival of the Nemean Games was founded in 1994, after more than 20 years of archaeological excavation at Nemea. The contemporary games, held every four years since 1996, are a form of popular education in history, as well as a counter to the commercialism of the modern Olympics. Races are organized according to age and gender, open to international participation. No medals are awarded, only crowns of palm branches and wild celery. People clad in tunics raced barefoot in the ruins of the ancient stadium. Two races were staged for the runners aged from 10 to 80, one of 100 metres (110 yards) and the other of 7.5 kilometres. The most striking feature of this attempt was the revival of the Hoplitodromos race. ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • TRACK AND FIELD - ANCIENT OLYMPICS : June 27 Track events included the stade race – the ancient version of a sprint – as participants ran from one end of the track to the other (approximately 200 meters). There was also a two-stade race (approximately 400 meters), as well as a long-distance run (ranging from seven to 24 stades). Field events, which resembled their modern equivalents, included the long jump, discus, shot put and javelin. The five-sport pentathlon included wrestling along with the discus, javelin, long jump and a sprint. Olympic Games also featured boxing, equestrian events and pankration, a combination of boxing and wrestling. Contrary to the spirit of gentlemanly amateurism that prevailed when the modern Olympic Games began, ancient Olympians prized victory highly. Olympic champions expected, and often received, great rewards from their home cities. Indeed, winners often lived the rest of their lives at public expense. As the Greek poet Pindar wrote, “For the rest of his life the victor enjoys a honey-sweet calm.” ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • SWIMMING GALA : June 27 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • SPORTS & SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 47 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • SPORT ACTIVITIES TEAM sports Volley-Ball Basketball Football Individual sports Table Tennis Tennis The Most Important is To PARTICIPATE. Pierre de Coubertin ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • SOCIAL EVENINGS ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • SOCIAL EVENINGS ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • ART, SONG, DANCE, POETRY AND LITERATURE WORKSHOPS ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • MEMORIES OF THE SESSION 52 ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • ©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012
    • Marjory MALBERT marjory.malbert@essec.edu Tél. : +33 6 83 24 03 66 57©Marjory MALBERT – The 52nd International Session for Young Participants – June 2012