Secondary 2 History-Competition of The Dutch and The British

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Secondary 2 History-Competition of The Dutch and The British

  1. 1. Competition between theDutch and the British
  2. 2. • The Malay Archipelago, Melaka and Java was controlled by the Dutch during the 18th century• In India, the British East India Company was set up by the British.• In India, the trade activities by the British was concentrated.• The high demand of tea in 18th the century made them extend their trade activities to China
  3. 3. • The 2 trading settlement in the Malay Archipelago that belonged to the British facilitates their trade activities with China and the Malay archipelago.• The 2 trading settlements are in Penang and Bencoolen• The Dutch and the British have a fierce competition to control the Asia sea trade route
  4. 4. Factors that led to the British to look for a new trading settlement• Break the Dutch trade monopoly• Safeguard the lucrative trade with China• Ineffective existing trading centres
  5. 5. Break the Dutch trade monopoly• The British and the other European ship are restricted by the Dutch to trade at Batavia in Java and not other ports controlled by the Dutch such as Melaka• High port fees and heavy taxes are also imposed by the Dutch on the ship that stop by Batavia• The foreign traders are demanded to fly the Dutch flag by the Dutch and apply for the permit or pass of the Dutch before they can carry out trade in the
  6. 6. • The 2 nation became fierce rivals because of the Dutch trade monopoly• This implies that the British were determined to have a new trading settlement which could be a good location of a port to safeguard the British ship and to reduce the dangers of the Dutch trade monopoly
  7. 7. Safeguard the lucrative trade with China• A highly lucrative trade with China was established by the British. Tea and opium were the main things being traded• The British were worried that the trade would be affected if the Dutch continue to extend their power in the Malay Archipelago• This implies that the British would continue to enjoy the trade
  8. 8. Ineffective existing trading centers• In Penang and Bencoolen, the British had trading settlements• The ports in Penang and Bencoolen were not suitable to be major trading centers for the British as Penang was too far north of Melaka; it was away from the Straits of Melaka which was the main passageway for ships to sail in between India and China
  9. 9. • The British ship using the Straits of Malacca to carry out trade with China could not be protected by Penang• It was also too far off for the British to investigate the Dutch’s activities in the region• The Archipelago traders are not willing to come all the way to Penang to trade.• Penang was frequently attacked by
  10. 10. • The Indian Ocean was faced by Bencoolen instead of the Straits of Melaka. Despite it controlling the entrance to the Straits of Sundra, it was less important for trading which did not attract the traders in the Malay Archipelago• This implies that the British want a new trade settlement which provide them a stopover point to replenish food supply on the ship, service and maintence their ship, offer a resting place for the crew
  11. 11. SummaryThe Malay Archipelago, Melaka and Java was controlled by the Dutch during the 18th century. The British East India Company in India was built by the Dutch. The British’s trade activity in India was concentrated. The high demand of tea in 18th the century made them extend their trade activities to China.Breaking the Dutch trade monopoly, safeguarding the lucrative trade with China and the ineffective existing trading centre led

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