• Save
Nic 39 2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Nic 39 2013

on

  • 4,011 views

La presentacion muestra los Instrumentos Financieros desde un enfoque de la NIC39 - Incluye Instrumentos Financieros Derivados Options, SWAPS, Forwards and Futures

La presentacion muestra los Instrumentos Financieros desde un enfoque de la NIC39 - Incluye Instrumentos Financieros Derivados Options, SWAPS, Forwards and Futures

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,011
Views on SlideShare
4,011
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
9
Downloads
9
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Before IAS 39, companies may have been parties to derivative instruments that were not recorded on the balance sheet or only a premium paid/received was recorded (examples: forward contracts, options contracts). Under IAS 39, not only are all financial instruments required to be recorded on the balance sheet, but all derivatives and many more financial assets must be carried at fair value. This represents a significant change from previous accounting. Under IAS 25 (whose scope is investments) many investments were carried either at cost or at the lower of cost or market (ie, “LOCOM”) with some subjectivity. In a hedge relationship, it is the change in value of the hedging instrument that drives the hedge accounting entries to be recorded by an enterprise. Under the hedge accounting models (fair value, cash flow, net investment – all discussed in a later module) it is the change in value of the hedging instrument that must be recorded each period that the hedge relationship is measured. IAS: IAS 39.27-29 (recognition) IAS 39.66-69 (measurement at fair value) IAS 39.153, 158 (changes in value of hedging instrument)
  • The main IAS that address financial instruments are IAS 39, 32, and 21. IAS 39 and 32 should be viewed together. IAS 39: deals with recognition and derecognition; initial and subsequent measurement; and hedge accounting IAS 32: deals with disclosures on financial instruments as well as certain important presentation issues (eg, offsetting, liability vs equity classification) IAS 21: deals with foreign exchange, and is fundamentally unchanged (except for referring to 39) and continues to be relevant. This standard also covers the accounting for net investments in foreign entities, and hedging of these net investments. Treatment of monetary instruments for FX changes continues to be applicable, ie, these must still be remeasured for FX at the spot rate (even if the instrument is HTM) Finance lease receivables and payables meet the definition of a financial instrument and are within the scope of IAS 32, therefore all the presentation and disclosure requirements of IAS 32 should be applied to lease receivables and payables. Lease receivables and payables are however scoped out of IAS 39 and the principles set out in IAS 17 should be applied in respect of recognition and measurement of these instruments.
  • These are basic types of derivatives commonly used by enterprises. Some significant features of each type of instrument include: Forward contract entered by two parties, usually directly (over the counter/ OTC contract) generally no premium settlement is mandatory Future exchange-traded forward contract, where there is an intermediary rather than entering the contract directly Option a premium is paid by one party to the other holder is allowed to let option expire unused (ie, settlement is not mandatory) Swap no premium paid settlement is mandatory IAS: IAS 32.9
  • Explain the participants the purpose of the standard, its relevance for all enterprises and the effective date.
  • The major principles introduced by IAS 39 are: Recognition of all derivatives Before IAS 39, many derivative instruments were not recorded on the balance sheet or only the premium paid/received was recorded (e.g.. options). Fair value measurement of derivatives and most financial assets Under IAS 39, not only are all financial instruments required to be recorded on the balance sheet, but all derivatives and many more financial assets must be carried at fair value. This represents a significant change from most GAAPs. Hedge accounting In the past, there were no rules in IFRS and in many other GAAPs on hedge accounting. Practice has varied, but typically the accounting treatment of the hedging instrument has followed the accounting treatment of the underlying transaction. IAS 39 establishes requirements governing when, and whether, economic hedging transactions will qualify for hedge accounting. Since hedge accounting allows a different accounting treatment to what would normally be applied, the conditions for hedge accounting are highly restrictive. All the above issues are discussed later during the presentation in more detail. These principles reflect all main trends in the development of IAS. Ref : IAS 39.27-29 (recognition) IAS 39.66-69 (measurement at fair value) IAS 39.142 (requirements for hedge accounting)
  • Each of these aspects of IAS 39 is expected to have a significant impact and will be addressed in the presentation.
  • Instruments that meet the definition of financial instruments as defined in IAS 39 and IAS 32 will fall in the scope of these standards (but for certain exceptions discussed later). Presenters may wish to choose an example of a financial asset or liability, for instance, from the list on the next slide to demonstrate application of the above definitions. The term “contract” in the above definitions refer to an agreement between two or more parties that has clear economic consequences and that the parties have little, if any, discretion to avoid, usually because the agreement is enforceable by law. An example of item not meeting the definition would be a tax liability, as it is not based on a contract between two or more parties. Ref: IAS 32.5-17 IAS 39.8-21
  • The scope of IAS 39 is broad and covers all financial instruments, both primary and derivatives. Ref: IAS 39.1,8,10
  • Exclusions are because: IASB did not intend to override other standards in existence IASB anticipates future standards to address Insurance Contracts, inc. weather derivatives However, an insurance company must follow IAS 39 for its other financial instruments (just not for insurance contracts) Ref: IAS. 39.1-5
  • It will help your audience to provide examples of the specific instruments that fall within the scope of the standard. Discuss each of the items on the slide in terms of the definition. Adjust the list as appropriate to your audience. For example if your audience has a banking background you should discuss loans and advances, bonds, trading instruments etc. The following are financial instruments – debtors; creditors; foreign currency forward contract; put and call options; equity investments.
  • Exclusions are because: IASB did not intend to override other standards in existence IASB anticipates future standards to address Insurance Contracts, inc. weather derivatives However, an insurance company must follow IAS 39 for its other financial instruments (just not for insurance contracts) Ref: IAS. 39.1-5
  • Explain that IAS 39 does not override the requirement to consolidate subsidiaries and to equity account associates. This is an issue that is particularly important for venture capitalists and other enterprises that have investment banking activities. In cases where an investor holds 20 – 50% of the shares in an enterprise there is a presumption that the investor has significant influence and therefore the investment must be accounted for under the equity method in terms of IAS 28, except in exceptional circumstances. Similarly, where an investor holds in excess of 50% the investor is presumed to have control unless it can be clearly demonstrated this is not the case. An investment is only exempted from being consolidated or equity accounted where: The investment is acquired and held solely with the intention of its disposal in the near future (the KPMG interpretation of near future is within 12 months of the first annual accounting period after the acquisition – see IAS Desk Alert 2001/5). Similarly being in the venture capital industry or having a ‘temporary’ intention does not qualify a company to apply this exemption. The investee operates under severe long term restrictions that severely restrict its ability to transfer funds to the investor. Recent development The IASB has agreed to allow an exception for investment banking or venture capital investments from being equity accounted and accounted for under IAS 39. No exception from consolidation is allowed.
  • Exclusions are because: IASB did not intend to override other standards in existence IASB anticipates future standards to address Insurance Contracts, inc. weather derivatives However, an insurance company must follow IAS 39 for its other financial instruments (just not for insurance contracts) Ref: IAS. 39.1-5
  • There are three characteristics noted in IAS that are used to determine whether a financial instrument is a derivative. An underlying is the source from which the derivative “derives” its value. It is a variable factor whose changes are observable/measurable. The requirement relating to no or little initial net investment has been interpreted to mean any amount that is less than the investment needed to acquire a primary financial instrument that has a similar response to market changes. The contract should be settled at a future date. A derivative instrument should have all three characteristics. Ref: IAS 39.10, 13-16
  • Commodities and commodity-based contracts: A commodity itself is not a financial instrument, and is therefore excluded from the scope of IAS 39. However, a commodity-based contract, ie, a commitment to purchase or a sale of commodities (broad definition) is a forward (if it meets all of the criteria of a derivative), and falls within the scope of IAS 39. IAS 39.6: commodity based contracts that give the right (to either party) to settle in cash or another financial instrument are within the scope. This can also be achieved if it is easy to sell the contract in the market prior to settlement. An exception to the general rule is made under IAS 39 for those commodity-based contracts that will be settled by actual physical delivery rather than settled through a net cash payment. This is the normal purchase and sale exemption. Regular way transactions: Why is the regular way exclusion necessary? Otherwise a derivative would be recognised between trade and settlement dates (essentially a forward) as the two parties have locked into a price for a transaction to be settled at a future date. If not for this exclusion, most transactions that do not settle on the same day they are entered would be considered to have a derivative that would fall within the accounting requirements of IAS 39 (ie, recorded on the balance sheet at FV). What is a regular way transaction A transaction that occurs within the time frame regulated by a market regulation or convention that dictates a short period between trade and settlement date For example: A security traded on an exchange with 3 or 6 day settlement period A fixed rate loan commitment that is made within the time frame established in the market for finalising the documentation Although these transactions would meet the definition of a derivative, it would not be recognised as a derivative if the transaction is settled within the time frame that is established in the market. Ref: IAS 39.6, 14 (normal purchases and sales) IAS 39.30-31 (regular way transactions )
  • It is necessary to distinguish embedded derivatives in order to achieve consistent treatment of all derivatives, whether embedded or not, and prevent enterprises from circumventing the requirement of carrying derivatives at their fair value with changes recorded in the income statement. For this reason IAS 39 requires to identify hybrid instruments that contain a derivative element. The derivative element can be based on an interest rate, security or commodity price, foreign exchange rate, index of prices or rates, or other variable. A derivative element may need to be separated and accounted for separately if certain conditions are met. These conditions are discussed on the next slide. Ref: IAS 39.22-26 (embedded derivatives)
  • If the host contract is already carried at fair value with adjustments recorded in P&L, there is no need to separate the embedded derivative from the host contract (effectively the embedded derivative is being carried at fair value already). If the features of the embedded are closely related to those of the host contract, there is also no need to separate the embedded derivative. To determine whether closely related, one should evaluate the interdependency between the embedded derivative and the host contract. We will discuss this further on a later slide. Ref: IAS 39.22-26
  • If the host contract is NOT a financial instrument, other IAS may apply. The enterprise should follow the relevant standard to account for the host contract. If there is an embedded derivative that should be separated, however the enterprise determines that it cannot measure it reliably, the enterprise must record the entire contract at fair value with changes recorded to P&L. Ref: IAS 39.23, 26
  • Previously IAS 21, IAS 25, IAS 32 were the only standards addressing financial instruments. No standard addressed recognition and measurement of financial instruments as a whole; only certain specific types of financial instruments were covered. Also, many more instruments were carried at cost (only trading and certain other investments were at fair value). Under IAS 39, all trading assets (which includes derivatives) and available for sale assets are at fair value. Main changes are: All derivatives are recognised Derivatives are at FV Some other financial assets are now recognised (generally related to derecognitions) Hedge accounting rules are set out IAS 39 provides a comprehensive approach to hedge accounting. The standard notes the criteria that must be met in order to apply hedge accounting. The standard then specifies the three hedge accounting models that may be used, and the accounting impact of each.
  • No enterprises are specifically excluded; however certain instruments are excluded, since they are not financial instruments or since they are dealt with in other standards. As discussed in previous notes, IAS 39 and IAS 32 (Disclosures) should be viewed together as a comprehensive set of standards on financial instruments. IAS 39 includes some additional disclosure requirements relating to financial risk management, hedge accounting, and activity recorded in equity (relating to AFS remeasurement and cash flow hedging). The IASB’s Implementation Guidance Committee (IGC) has issued implementation guidance in the form of Questions and Answers (Q&A’s). Note that Q&A’s do not have the same authority as a Standard or Interpretation, however the expectation is that this guidance should be adhered to by enterprises. The IASB announced in August 2001 that IAS 39 will be going through and improvements project. The improvements project will focus on amending IAS 39 based on comments received on application difficulties. The improvements project will also consider updating IAS 39 to include a number of the issues that have been addressed by the Q&As. IAS: IAS 39.1 (scope)
  • IAS 39 is considered to be an interim standard. IASB issued this standard to meet its commitment to IOSCO of a comprehensive body of GAAP by 1998. The standard was based mainly on US GAAP (SFAS 115, 125, 133). However, a financial instruments project continues with the Joint Working Group (JWG). This group with participation of standards setters from 13 countries + IASB released a new draft standard in December 2000. This draft standard proposes FV measurement for all financial instruments with all fair value changes recognised in the income statement and does not allow hedge accounting. Once the JWG finalises its standard, the IASB is expected to release this as a new exposure draft (that will eventually replace IAS 32 and 39).
  • Exclusions are because: IASB did not intend to override other standards in existence IASB anticipates future standards to address Insurance Contracts, inc. weather derivatives However, an insurance company must follow IAS 39 for its other financial instruments (just not for insurance contracts) Other exclusions are, for example, ‘taxes’ since they are not a financial instrument (do not comply with the definition, being based on the law rather than on a contractual obligation). IAS: IAS 39.1-5 FIA: Chapter 2.1
  • Exclusions are because: IASB did not intend to override other standards in existence IASB anticipates future standards to address Insurance Contracts, inc. weather derivatives However, an insurance company must follow IAS 39 for its other financial instruments (just not for insurance contracts) Other exclusions are, for example, ‘taxes’ since they are not a financial instrument (do not comply with the definition, being based on the law rather than on a contractual obligation). IAS: IAS 39.1-5 FIA: Chapter 2.1
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • If the host contract is already carried at fair value with adjustments recorded in P&L, there is no need to separate the embedded derivative from the host contract (effectively the embedded derivative is being carried at fair value already). If the features of the embedded are closely related to those of the host contract, there is also no need to separate the embedded derivative. To determine whether closely related, one should evaluate the interdependency between the embedded derivative and the host contract. We will discuss this further on a later slide. IAS: IAS 39.22-26 FIA: Chapter 3 (entire chapter on embedded derivatives)
  • IAS: IAS 32.9 FIA: Chapter 2.2.3 An informal definition of a financial instrument is that it is an instrument in the last step before becoming cash.
  • Fundamental principals are: ALL financial assets and liabilities are recognised WHEN under a contractual arrangement (not necessarily a written one) Presenter might consider an example of recognition of a forward contract as explained in IAS 39.29 (c). Ref: IAS 39.27-29
  • Presenters should emphasise the fact that at initial measurement Cost = FV given or received It should be emphasized that it is necessary to fair value zero or low interest loans at initial recognition following the requirements in paragraphs IAS 39.66 and 67 to recognise a financial instrument at its cost, which is the fair value of the consideration given or received. Although these paragraphs do not provide a clear definition of "consideration given/received", the guidance in this respect can be found in Q&A 66-3: "On initial recognition, the carrying amount of the loan is the fair value of the consideration given to obtain the right to a payment of 1000 in five years. The fair value of that right is the present value of the future payment of 1000 discounted using the market rate of interest of 10% for a similar loan for five years.“ Q&A 66-3 clarifies that if the cash proceeds exceed the fair value of the loan, the cash given/received is not only for the loan, but also for other economic benefits (not necessarily an asset). The cash proceeds relating to the other economic benefits can be expensed immediately, recognised as an asset or as capital contribution following the applicable accounting principles of generally other standards than IAS 39. Ref: IAS.39.66-67 IAS 18.11-12
  • Direct costs of the transaction Subsequently transaction costs are NOT included in the FV measurement of the instrument What happens to the transaction costs in subsequent measurement follows the same treatment as the financial instrument itself. Therefore if the instrument is subsequently measured at: Historical cost: transaction costs remain in the carrying amount until disposal/impairment Amortised cost: transaction costs are amortised over the life of the instrument FV with changes in equity: transaction costs make up part of the adjustment recorded in equity FV with changes to P&L: transaction costs are immediately recorded to P&L in the first period the instrument is remeasured Therefore, if the instrument is at (amortised) cost, the transaction costs are realised by either: Amortised to the income statement Taken to the income statement upon impairment or through realisation, if the instrument is sold or disposed of Ref: IAS 39.17, 66
  • All categories should be presented separately, normally on the face of the balance sheet Trading instrument acquired with the intent of short term profit taking (based on initial intention); or part of a portfolio in which there is evidence of an actual pattern of profit taking, regardless of intention. There is no definition of short-term in IAS 39. An enterprise should adopt a definition of short-term and apply this consistently. An instrument that is acquired with an intention to hold it for a long period should not be classified as held for trading. After being designated held for trading, a single instrument in a portfolio may, however, be held for a longer period of time. (Q&A 10-15) Loans and receivables originated. This category was included in IAS 39 at the specific request of financial institutions. Banks felt that their loans and other receivables portfolios should be at cost, but did not want these to be subject to the strict tainting rules of the HTM category. This categorisation gives banks the flexibility to later sell their loans or other originated receivables without tainting all these instruments. Assets generally created from an enterprise’s primary activities (loans, trade receivables) funds must be provided directly from lender to borrower, or funds provided at the moment of origination (through a 3rd party) HTM – most rules surrounding this category. For that reason it is addressed separately in this module presumption in IAS that HTM is an EXCEPTION category strict tainting rules AFS - residual category Ref: IAS 39.10, 19-21 IAS 39.68
  • One of the fundamental changes introduced in IAS 39 was the requirement to measure most financial assets at fair value. Therefore, any financial assets that are not measured at fair value are generally regarded as an exception. Financial liabilities are measured at amortised cost unless they are derivatives or other trading liabilities. Ref: IAS 39.69-70
  • This is a decision tree for determining subsequent measurement: The lecturer should walk through the “yes” answers first. Note that all d erivatives are Trading instruments, and at FV. The order of the questions is the order in which the assessment needs to take place. Some categories have more strict criteria than others. Exercise (to get audience participation): Ask audience how an equity instrument could possibly be classified. Have a participant walk through all of the possibilities using this decision tree Notes: Trading (yes) Originated (no) HTM (no – no determinable payments or fixed maturity) AFS (yes – most typical) Walk through some of the other typical financial assets that are relevant to your audience – bonds, loans and receivables, derivatives. Ref: IAS 39.69-76
  • Decision tree for determining subsequent measurement: Walk through the “yes” answers first Derivatives are Trading instruments, and at FV Ref: IAS 39.93
  • For instruments at FV – accounting may differ Trading and derivatives (not hedges) – P&L AFS – P&L or Equity depending on chosen accounting policy – this is an enterprise-wide choice and it is highly unlikely that an enterprise would be able to justify a change to recognise changes in fair value in equity once it has adopted a policy of recognising these changes in the income statement. Therefore it is important that, on adoption of IAS 39, careful consideration be given as to which policy will be adopted. For unrealised gains and losses in equity = recycle to income statement (when realised or if impairment occurs) Ref: IAS 39.103-107
  • No fair value adjustment is recorded until Asset is disposed (sale, matures) Asset is impaired Amortisation of premiums and discounts is recognised in the income statement Ref: IAS 39.108
  • Emphasise that a number of other conditions also have to be met for an instrument to be classified as HTM. We will consider these in the following slides.
  • BOX 1: Time period must be DEFINED. This is why equities cannot be HTM and are always measured at fair value BOX 2: Holder has provided “option” to issuer, therefore holder is deemed not to have intent to hold. If not significantly below amortised cost, HTM Is possible. BOX 3: This indicates that holder has profit taking in mind, or at least does not have a positive intent to hold-to-maturity. General: There are tainting exceptions in very RARE circumstances: remote instances are those beyond control of holder not foreseeable non-recurring Examples of those rare situations: Creditworthiness deteriorates Change in tax law Major business combination Change in allowable investments (regulators) Change in capital adequacy Significant increase in risk Ref: IAS 39.79, 82, 84
  • An enterprise needs to demonstrate its ability to hold a financial asset to maturity to categorise it as such. The enterprise cannot demonstrate the ability if: financial resources are not available to the enterprise to finance the asset to maturity. For example, if it is expected or likely that an enterprise will acquire another business and will need all of its funding for this investment, the resources may not be available to continue to hold certain debt instruments; or legal or other constraints could frustrate the intention of the enterprise to hold the investment to maturity. For example, the expectation that a regulator will exercise its right in certain industries like the banking and insurance industry to force an enterprise to sell certain assets. A credit downgrade of a notch within a class or from one rating class to the immediately lower rating class often could be considered reasonably anticipated. Therefore, if such a downgrade would result in the sale of instruments (for example, because of regulatory restrictions on holding assets of certain credit ratings) the enterprise would be considered not to have the ability to hold the asset to maturity. Assess at each balance sheet date!! Ref: IAS 39.79, 82, 84, 87-89
  • Held to maturity instruments are defined as instruments that Have a fixed maturity Have fixed or determinable payments An enterprise cannot classify any financial assets as held-to-maturity if the enterprise has sold, transferred or exercised a put option of more than a insignificant amount of held-to-maturity investments in the current year or two preceding years. Exceptions: Sale occurred close enough to maturity/call date so that changes in market rates would not have had a significant effect on fair value; OR Enterprise has already collected substantially all of financial asset’s principal; OR Sales are due to an isolated event that is beyond the enterprise’s control and non-recurring which could not have been reasonably anticipated In case of a change in ability or intent, all HTM instruments are reclassified as available for sale or trading and measured at fair value. Due to the ‘tainting’ of ALL held-to-maturity instruments if there is any transfer or sale of a held-to-maturity instrument before maturity, it is important that the classification of financial instruments as held-to-maturity is rigorous to avoid tainting of a whole portfolio. Assets held under repo’s could possibly be classified as HTM, but be careful that there is no significant risk that they will be returned before maturity. Ref: IAS 39.79-92
  • If a portfolio is tainted ALL HTM instruments (not only those instruments in the portfolio or in the group entity in which the tainting occurs) must be reclassified HTM instruments become tainted if there is a sales OR a reclassifications of HTM instruments (Q&A 83-2) ALL instruments that were previously classified as HTM must be reclassified and measured at FV for 2 full financial years Exceptions: Sales occurring close enough to maturity (generally within 3 months) Enterprise has already collected substantially all of principal (>90%) Sales are due to isolated event beyond control of the enterprise Example: tainting occurs in June 2001 all HTM reclassified to AFS or trading; remeasured to FV company has a 31 December year end cannot use HTM again until at least 1/1/2004 Ref: IAS 39.83, 90-92
  • Effective interest method: The interest rate inherent in a financial instrument at inception This is the rate that discounts all expected future cash flows to the instrument to the initial cost of the investment Important when measuring at cost (and also for calculating the interest on AFS and trading instruments) Market rate = effective interest rate, or internal rate of return (same thing) This example illustrates how to calculate amortised cost using the effective interest rate cost for a financial asset. Amortised cost for a liability would mirror the treatment applied for a financial asset. Ref: IAS 39.73
  • To calculate the effective interest income, the effective interest rate is applied to the amortised cost of the loan at the end of the previous period. The difference between the calculated effective interest for a given period and the asset’s coupon is the amortisation of the discount during that period. Thus the amortised cost of the loan at the end of the previous period plus amortisation in the current period gives the amortised cost at the end of the current period. Note that the effective yield method is different from the straight line method. IAS 39 does not allow the straight line method.
  • The measurement of a financial asset or financial liability denominated in a foreign currency is first determined in the foreign currency. Then the foreign currency amount is reported in the reporting currency using the closing rate or a rate on the valuation date. The issue which arises due to interactions between IAS 39 and IAS 21 is how to record gain and loss which include foreign exchange differences and other changes. This slide explains the requirements in this respect. Ref: IAS 21.15, 17 IAS 39.103 (b) Q&A Other-5
  • Assets designated as held to maturity (HTM) are measured at amortised cost (there are strict rules as to what can be designated as HTM). Assets originated by the enterprise (e.g. loans made by a bank to a customer) are measured at amortised cost. Assets available for sale (assets that do not fall into any other category) are measured at fair value with changes in value either going to income or equity (there is a one-off policy choice to be made which must then be applied consistently). Gains and losses built up in equity are recycled into income on disposal of the instrument. Trading assets and liabilities (including all derivatives) are measured at fair value with changes in value recorded in the income statement. Other liabilities are held at amortised cost. Ref: IAS 39.68-69 (classification and measurement of financial assets) IAS 39.79-92 (held-to-maturity investments) IAS 39.93-94 (subsequent measurement of financial liabilities) IAS 39.95 –102 (fair value measurement) IAS 39.103 (reporting of fair value changes in the income statement)
  • The slide gives examples of more complex derecognition situations which will require special attention during IAS 39 implementation. Ref.: IAS 39.35 (financial assets) IAS 39.57 (financial liabilities) SIC – 12 Consolidation – Special Purpose Entities
  • Assessment of impairment of financial instruments is a two step process. The enterprise must first determine whether there is objective evidence that impairment exists for a financial asset. This assessment should be done at least at each reporting period. If there is no objective evidence of impairment no further action need be taken at that time for that instrument. However if there is objective evidence of impairment, the enterprise should record an impairment loss during the period so that the financial asset is recorded at its recoverable amount. Ref: IAS 39.109
  • Assessment of whether there is objective evidence of impairment is a judgemental process. This slide lists examples of indicators that an asset may be impaired. For fixed income (debt) instruments, impairment exists once it is probable that a counterparty will not make all principal and interest payments due on an instrument in the agreed manner. Therefore impairment of debt instruments generally can be determined through analysing expected future cash flows. For equity instruments, impairment cannot be identified based on analysing cash flows, as with debt instruments. Instead impairment is based on the identification of indicators such as those characteristics described above. An additional indicator is the magnitude of the difference between the original cost and the current value of the equity instrument. The greater this difference, the greater also is the evidence of potential impairment. However, on its own the fact that the fair value of an equity security is below its cost does not necessarily indicate impairment. For further details on objective evidence of impairment for equity securities please see IAS Desk Alert 02/43.   Ref: IAS 39.110
  • For assets that ha d previously been revalued upwards which subsequently become impaired, the impairment loss is recognised in equity to the extent it reverses previous upward revaluations of the asset. Any impairment of the asset below its original cost is recognised directly in profit and loss. Ref: IAS 39.117-119
  • For assets that had previously been revalued downwards, which subsequently become impaired, the total impairment loss is recognised in P&L. Ref: IAS 39.117-119
  • Derecognition of assets: Realisation Expiration Transfer – several approaches under IAS 39, however must: Give up right to benefits of the assets by surrendering control Not have a right to reacquire unless the asset is readily obtainable in the market Not be obligated to repurchase the asset on terms that provided the transferee with a lender’s return Not retain substantially all the risks and returns of ownership through a total return swap or unconditional put option Derecognition of liabilities: Legal release is required No “in substance” defeasance If terms substantially modified ( more than 10%, for a loan) - derecognise old liability and recognise new liability Ref: IAS 39.35 (financial asset) IAS 39.57 (financial liability)
  • The slide gives examples of more complex derecognition situations which will require special attention during IAS 39 implementation. Ref.: IAS 39.35 (financial assets) IAS 39.57 (financial liabilities) SIC – 12 Consolidation – Special Purpose Entities
  • The objective of hedge accounting is to change the timing of recognition of changes in value where there otherwise could be mismatches such as those noted above. Reasons for mismatches are: Recognition mismatches between hedged item and hedging instrument in the balance sheet or income statement ( e.g. floating rate interest; future sales); Measurement mismatches between hedged item and hedging instrument because hedged item is not measured at FV (e.g. originated loans, debt).
  • The lecturer should discuss the usage of each of the 3 models for hedge accounting under IAS 39 Hedge of a net investment in a foreign entity, definition from IAS 21: change in value of a foreign entity due to changes in foreign exchange rates Examples of hedged items: FVH: Fixed rate assets Fixed rate liabilities CFH Floating rate assets Floating rate liabilties Firm commitments Forecasted transactions Ref: IAS. 39.127-137 IAS 21.24-26
  • Financial asset/liability: Separate risks are assumed to be separately measurable For example: interest rate comprises risk free rate, sector spread (together a benchmark interest rate) and credit spread. The risk free rate or the benchmark interest rate may be designated as the risk hedged. Non-financial asset/liability: restriction is because separate risks are not distinguishable. For example: Company A manufactures tyres. One of the most significant physical components of tires is rubber. The company hedges its exposure to changes in the changes of the inventory by entering into a forward contract to sell rubber at a fixed price. Because tires are a non-financial asset and rubber is only an ingredient in manufacturing them, Company A has to designate tire price changes as the hedged risk, and not changes in rubber component only. Ref: IAS 39.l27-130
  • Hedging instruments: Instrument is in general a derivative Derivatives with external parties (see later slides on central treasury) May use a non-derivative financial instrument only for fx hedging Discuss exception Net written option cannot be a hedging instrument Ref: IAS 39.122-126
  • The hedge relationship must meet certain criteria in order for the hedging instrument and the hedged item to qualify for hedge accounting. At the inception of the hedge, companies are required to provide formal documentation which includes: The enterprise’s risk management objective and strategy for undertaking the hedge; The nature of the risk being hedged; Identification of the hedged item and the hedging instrument; The method of measuring hedge effectiveness. At inception, the hedge should be expected to be close to 100% effective, on an ongoing basis the hedge should remain between 80% to 125% effective. For cash flow hedges there must be a very high likelihood that the transaction will occur and affect the income statement. Ref.: IAS 39.142-152 (hedge accounting criteria)
  • Last bullet: important as enterprise must keep to this method throughout the hedge period Ref: IAS 39.142
  • Where the change in fair value of the hedging instrument is more than the change in fair value of the hedged item, not all the change in fair value is needed to make the future offset. This ineffectiveness is recognised in the income statement immediately for both a fair value hedge and a cash flow hedge. Where the change in fair value of the hedging instrument is less than the change in fair value of the hedged item, all the change in fair value is needed for future offset so, under a cash flow hedge the full change in value will be reported directly in equity. When the future transaction takes place, however, the ineffectiveness will be reported in the income statement at that stage. However, if effectiveness falls outside 80-125% range, hedge accounting must be discontinued altogether. Ref: IAS 39.146
  • Presenter should discuss this slide in the following order: Left: continuation of hedge accounting – An enterprise may continue to use cash flow hedge accounting only when a forecasted transaction is highly probable. This section of the scale notes a transaction that is highly probable but has not become a firm commitment. Right: gain/loss to income statement – As the transaction is not expected to occur, any gain or loss previously recorded to equity must be removed from there and recorded to P&L. This must occur as soon as the transaction is no longer expected to occur. Middle: freeze mode – The status of the forecasted transaction is such that it is still expected to occur however it is not highly probable. In this situation, an enterprise must stop using hedge accounting going forward. However any gain or loss previously recorded to equity may stay there until the transaction actually occurs or is no longer expected to occur. Ref: IAS 39.163
  • When an effective hedge relationship no longer exists, the accounting for the hedging instrument and the hedged item must revert to accounting under the normal provisions. However, this does not affect any previous hedge accounting records. Ref: IAS 39.156-157, 163
  • In a fair value hedge , the accounting for the hedging instrument does not change (for instance, a derivative is already recorded at FV with changes recorded to P&L). It is the accounting for the hedged item that is (generally) different than under normal accounting rules. Hedged items that under normal circumstances are carried at (amortised) cost or fair value with FV changes to equity are instead recorded at fair value with FV changes to P&L with respect to risks hedged. Therefore if the relationship is totally effective, the changes in value of the hedging instrument and hedged item should offset each other. Examples of FV hedges: hedge the value of inventory hedge the FV of a fixed rate debt In a cash flow hedge , the accounting for the hedging instrument is (generally) different than under normal accounting rules. The hedging instrument under normal circumstances (when a derivative) is carried at fair value with changes in FV recorded to P&L. In a cash flow hedge, the effective portion of the hedging instrument is recorded to EQUITY rather than to P&L, until such time that the cash flow/future transaction occurs. The ineffective portion is still recorded to P&L. Therefore if the relationship is totally effective, the changes in value of the hedging instrument are recorded to equity until a later date. Examples of CF hedges: hedge future sales of inventory hedge the expected cash flows of variable rate debt The hedge of net investment is similar to a cash flow hedge Ref: IAS 39.137(a), 153-157 (Fair Value Hedges) IAS 39.137(b), 158-163 (Cash Flow Hedges) IAS 39.137 (c), 164 (Net Investment in a Foreign Entity)
  • This slide demonstrates accounting for the firm commitment or forecasted transaction (when it occurs): If asset or liability is recognised hedge adjustment in equity becomes part of basis of asset/liability. For example, Company A forecasts purchase of inventory and enters into a forward contract to hedge price risk. When the contract is executed and inventory is recorded on the company’s books, the fair value changes of the forward contract recorded in equity are recycled from equity and added/deducted to/from the cost of the inventory. If the hedged item is already recorded on the financial statements, e.g. a floating rate note, the fair value changes on the hedging instrument are recorded in equity and recylced into P&L when the hedged item affects P&L, i.e. the interest is recorded. Thus, there is no basis adjustment in this case. Ref: IAS 39.160-161
  • Explain to participants why the classification of instruments, by the issuer, as debt or equity is important considering impact of the classification on financial ratios. Explain that to the extent the issuer has a contractual obligation to deliver cash or another financial instrument under potentially unfavourable conditions there is a liability. Equity represents a residual interest. The classification is done at the date of original issuance and is not changed based on subsequent changes in intention. The treatment of interest, dividends, losses and gains should follow the classification of the underlying instrument. Therefore amounts paid on instruments classified as equity should be treated as distributions to owners. Amounts paid on instruments classified as a liability should be reported as an expense in the income statement. Ref: IAS 32.18-22, 30-32 IAS 32 Appendix A18-A24
  • Ask participants to apply the principles in the previous slide to decide how the instruments on the slide should be classified. Answers: Perpetual debt instruments : debt if contractual obligation to pay interest in perpetuity Convertible bond: compound instrument – present value of interest and principal cash flows is an obligation, option to convert to a fixed number of equity shares is equity. Redeemable preference shares : a liability. Where instruments have an element of debt and an element of equity the instrument is a compound instrument and should be split between its components. IAS 32 does not provide specific guidance on how to perform the split. In practice it is generally determined by calculating the fair value of the most measurable component (normally the debt) and allocating the balance of the issue proceeds to the equity element. Where the equity element can also be valued, the allocation can be based on the relative fair values of each of the components. No gain or loss should arise as a result of the classification of a compound instrument. For preference shares the classification depends on the contractual arrangements. The key issue is whether or not there is a contractual obligation to redeem the shares or to pay dividends. To the extent there is a contractual obligation there is a liability component. Ref: IAS 32.18-29 IAS 32 Appendix A18-A24
  • Explain the impact of offset on financial ratios. In order to use netting, the enterprise must have both (1) the right to offset and (2) the intention to settle in that manner. Ref: IAS 32.33-41
  • Assets and liabilities subject to master netting arrangements generally do not qualify for offset. These arrangements provide for a single net settlement of all financial instruments covered by the agreement in the event of default on or termination of any one contract. This commonly results in a right of set-off only in circumstances outside the normal course of business (ie, generally there is no intention to settle in this manner). The slide also provides other examples of transactions when offsetting would be inappropriate. These situations are more self explanatory. Ref: IAS 32.40
  • Discloure requirements under IAS are focused on providing information that enhances the understanding of financial instruments in relation to the enetrprise’s financial position, performance and cash flows. As part of this, enterprises are required to provide a discussion of financial risk management objectives and policies, including hedging policies.Disclosure requirements also ficus on providing fair value information for instrumentsnot carried at fair value. Refer to KPMG’s IAS Illustrative Financial Statements to illustrate the disclosure requirements. Full details of disclosure requirements are documented in IAS 32 and KPMG’s annual IAS Disclosure Checklist.
  • IAS 32 sets out the required disclosures and presentation of financial instruments . IAS 39 introduces significant additional disclosures relating to hedge accounting, use of derivatives and risk management strategies. Ref.: IAS 39.166 -170

Nic 39 2013 Nic 39 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • KPMG NIC 39 Instrumentos Financieros Reconocimiento Y Medición Presentado por Mario Pinglo García Lima, Junio 2005 © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 1
  • NIC 39 modifica significativamente la contabilización de los instrumentos financieros ge n oc o s ne en ce co ent La vos l v ac en l m ra lan re m ti a id m fin alo ba se tru ay a r r el o s i n s or nc az í a ie o n en ivad los de ro ab lo s se le de d os s To r La medición del instrumento de cobertura es la base de la contabilidad de coberturas© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 2
  • NIC para instrumentos financieros NIC 39 NIC 32 NIC 21Reconocimiento Medición Instrumentos Revelación Medición de y desrecono- de derivados y moneda cimiento instrumentos y contabilidad presentación extranjera yde instrumentos financieros de cobertura cobertura de financieros inversiones netas © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 3 View slide
  • Principales Instrumentos Financieros Instrumentos Financieros de Deuda. Son contratos celebrados para satisfacer las necesidades de financiamiento temporal en Ia entidad emisora y se pueden dividir en: Instrumentos de Deuda que pueden ser colocados a descuento sin cláusulas de interés. Los efectos de diferencia entre el costo neto de adquisición y el monto al vencimiento del mismo representa intereses. Instrumentos de Deuda con Cláusula de Interés, los cuales pueden colocarse con un premio a descuento. Dichos premios o descuentos forman parte de los intereses. Instrumentos de Capital. Es cualquier contrato, documento a título referido a un contrato, que evidencie Ia participación en el capital contable de una entidad. Desde el punto de vista del inversionista, estos instrumentos financieros derivados pueden ser utilizados y mantenidos por sus tenedores. Los derivados Implícitos (embedded derivatives) son aquellos componentes de un contrato que en forma explicita no pretenden originar un instrumento financiero derivado por si mismo, pero que los riesgos implícitos generados o cubiertos por esos componentes difieren en sus características económicas y riesgos de los de dicho contrato.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 4 View slide
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 5
  • La NIC 39 aspira a proveer principios contables con respecto a los activos y pasivos financieros  Norma internacional de contabilidad sobre el reconocimiento y la medición de instrumentos financieros  Complementa los requisitos de revelación en la NIC 32  Relevante para todas las empresas  Aplica a todos los instrumentos financieros (con ciertas exclusiones)  En vigor y obligatorio para las empresas que cotizan en bolsa en Europa a partir de los ejercicios que comienzan el 1 de enero del 2005© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 6
  • Todas las tendencias en las NIC están reflejadas en la NIC 39 Principios clave de la NIC 39 g e o n o to s ra n ne ce re men La vos l v ac en l m ti a Complejidad id m fin alo ba s s tru ce c ay a r r el rio ins or nc az lan e ía i e on en nda los de ro ab Más revelaciones lo s se le cu s se odo s TMedición al valor razonable Reducción de opciones La medición del instrumento de cobertura es la base de la contabilidad de coberturas © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 7
  • Aspectos de la NIC 39 que tienen un impacto significativo  Identificación de instrumentos derivados independientes e implícitos  Clasificación y medición  Eliminación  Deterioro  Contabilidad de cobertura  Revelación© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 8
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 9
  • Definiciones de instrumentos financieros Un instrumento financiero es un contrato que da lugar a un activo financiero y a un pasivo financiero o capital Activo financiero Pasivo financiero Capital Derecho a recibir/ Obligación Interés intercambiar un contractual a residual activo financiero entregar/ o capital de otra intercambiar un empresa bajo activo condiciones financiero bajo potencialmente condiciones no favorables favorables© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 10
  • Tipos de instrumentos financieros Instrumentos financieros Instrumentos financieros Instrumentos derivados primarios Ejemplos Ejemplos Cuentas por cobrar, por pagar, Contratos a plazo/de futuros, valores de capital y de deuda, opciones, permutas financieras préstamos y depósitos© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 11
  • Alcance de la NIC 39 Activo 20X2 20X1 Pasivo y Patrimonio Neto 20X2 20X1 Activo corriente: Pasivo corriente: Caja y bancos 7,362 5,067 Sobregiros y pagarés bancarios 1,617 1,272 Cuentas por cobrar Cuentas por pagar comerciales 18,723 15,438 Comerciales 8,864 - Otras cuentas por pagar 26,129 16,392 Otras cuentas a cobrar 12,417 1,263 Parte corriente de deudas a largo plazo 7,107 3,273 Existencias 28,716 29,154 ------------ ---------- Total pasivo corriente 53,576 36,375 Gastos anticipados 4,305 2,781 Deudas a largo plazo 60,891 64,764 ------------ ------------ ------------ ---------- Total activo corriente 61,464 38,265 Total pasivo 114,467 101,139 ------------ ------------ ------------ ----------- Inversiones en valores 45 54 Patrimonio neto: Capital social 129,100 122,347 Activo fijo, neto 177,725 193,412 Reservas 29,371 26,500 Intangibles, neto 57,924 36,238 Resultados acumulados 14,710 10,072 ------------ ---------- Total patrimonio neto 184,637 168,218 Impuesto diferido 1,946 1,388 ------------ ------------ ------------ ----------- Total activo 299,104 269,357 Total pasivo y patrimonio neto 299,104 269,357 ======= ======= ======= =======© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 12
  • Ejercicio: ¿qué hubo de?  Cuentas por cobrar  Contratos de productos básicos  Cuentas por pagar  Arrendamiento de operación  Propiedad, planta y equipo  Pagos por adelantado  Contrato a plazo de moneda  Ingresos sobre la renta por extranjera pagar  Opciones dobles  Garantía  Obligación a entregar sus  Inversiones de capital propias acciones  Activos intangibles  Inventarios© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 13
  • Exclusiones del alcance  Intereses en subsidiarias, asociadas y negocios en conjunto (NIC 27,28,31)  Derechos y obligaciones bajo los contratos de arrendamiento (NIC 17)  Derechos y obligaciones bajo los contratos de seguros (proyecto de seguros)  Activos y pasivos de empleadores bajo los planes de beneficios para empleados (NIC 19)  Instrumentos de capital emitidos por la empresa emisora de informes  Contratos de garantía financiera (NIC 37)  Contratos para consideración de contingencias en una combinación de negocios (NIC 22, par. 65-76)  Instrumentos derivados relacionados con el clima (básicamente un tipo de contrato de seguros)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 14
  • ¿Cuándo aplica NIC 39 a las inversiones de capital?¿Tiene usted… ? Control ? Control conjunto ? Influencia significativa ? Ninguna influencia Consolidación Contabilidad de Valor razonable Consolidar proporcional capital o costo NIC 22 NIC 31 NIC 28 NIC 39 NIC 27 SIC 13 SIC 3 SIC 9 SIC 12 LA IASB decidió conceder una excepción para la contabilidad de capital pero no para la consolidación © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 15
  • Porque es Importante la Contabilización de Instrumentos Financieros Desarrollos en los mercados financieros  Instrumentos complejos  Tecnología de información y telecomunicaciones  Los métodos de administración de riesgos requieren el valor razonable  Más oportunidades de cambiar el perfil de riesgo (a través de coberturas)  Las convenciones y los estándares contables se quedaron atrás de los desarrollos en los mercados financieros  Las prácticas contables actuales, que se basan en costos históricos y el principio de realización, tienen desventajas importantes.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 16
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 17
  • Instrumentos derivados independientes Tres característicasCambios en el valorrazonable resultantes delcambio en la tasa de interés, el precio del valor, el precio del producto Ninguna o mínima Se liquidan básico, inversión neta en una fecha el tipo de cambio de inicial futura moneda extranjera, la calificación de crédito, u otro índicesubyacentes© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 18
  • Instrumentos derivados excluidos de las reglas contables de NIC 39 sobre instrumentos derivados Contratos normales de compra Compras y ventas de forma y venta de productos básicos regular (NIC 39.30) (NIC 39.6 & 14)  Entrega dentro de una  Con el propósito de satisfacer estructura de tiempo establecida los requisitos de compra, venta por regulaciones o o uso convenciones en el mercado  Designados para ese propósito  Se aplica contabilización de fecha del negocio o fecha de  Se espera que se liquiden por liquidación entrega© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 19
  • Instrumentos derivados intercalados ¿Qué son?  Un término o términos explícitos en un contrato que hacen que éste tenga el efecto de un instrumento derivado  Ejemplos: bonos convertibles, contratos denominados en moneda extranjera ¿Qué importancia tiene esto?  Puede que se requiera separación del contrato principal  Un instrumento derivado separado se registra al valor razonable No hay forma de evitar que se midan los instrumentos derivados al valor razonable© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 20
  • Instrumentos derivados intercalados ¿Cuándo están separados? Bono convertible  El contrato principal no se registra al valor razonable en las pérdidas y ganancias Instrumento derivado  El instrumento derivado intercalado es derivado si es intercalado independiente opción sobre acciones  El instrumento derivado Contrato intercalado no está muy principal relacionado con las características económicas y valor de riesgos del contrato principal tasa fija (p.ej. característica de apalancamiento)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 21
  • Tratamiento contable de instrumentos derivados intercalados Contrato principal e instrumentos derivados intercalados  Aplicar las reglas de NIC 39 (u otra NIC aplicable si el contrato principal no es un instrumento financiero) Si el instrumento secundario intercalado no puede identificarse y medirse de manera confiable :  Medir todo el contrato combinado al valor razonable como un instrumento financiero retenido para negociar© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 22
  • Economía de la Información•Lo que es crítico es que los compradores y vendedores tengan informacióncompleta y veraz al momento de adquirir un servicio•Si no hay discriminación de precio y calidad, hay un problema de informaciónasimétrica (problemas de agencia), tanto en el caso de riesgo moral como deselección adversa.•Se reduce el riesgo moral y selección a través de “señalización” en donde la parteque tiene más información. Señala que es lo que sabe con sus acciones•Eliminando los problemas de riesgo moral y selección adversa, queagentes podrían obtener “ganancias razonables”.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 23
  • Regulación Global Parte de nueva arquitectura financiera Bank of International Settlements (BIS), acuerdo de Basilea (1974)  En 1988, adecuación capital propio/prestamos International Association of Securities Commission (IASCO) creada en 1974. Commodity Futures Trading Comission (CFTC)  Legisla sobre futuros Además existen asociaciones auto reglamentadas (Self Regulated Organizations) SRO  National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD)  National Futures Association (NFA) Principios de Contabilidad son los USGAAPS (General Accepted Accounting Practices)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 24
  • Regulación en el Perú Banco Central de Reserva del Perú (BCRP)  Informa sobre finanzas nacionales y sus disposiciones son obligatorias para otras instituciones bancarias Superintendencia de Banca Y Seguros (SBS)  Proteger los intereses del público en el ámbito de sistemas financieros y seguros  Supervisa el cumplimiento de disposiciones complementarias del BCRP Comisión Nacional Supervisora de Empresas y Valores (CONASEV)  Rol del estado para supervisar emisión de valores.  Nueva Ley General de Sociedades (1993) Incorpora las Normas Internacionales de Contabilidad (NIC) a los Principios de Contabilidad Generalmente Aceptados (PCGA) en el Perú© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 25
  • Mercados e Información Mercados Competitivos: supuesto es que hay información completa sobre estados actuales y estados contingentes Mercados de derivados, cubre muchas veces las contingencias, genera posibilidades de mercados Supuesto es que haya información cercana a la completa y los mercados sean eficientes (Fama)  Problema es información asimétrica entre el emisor (issuer) y el comprador (underwriter)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 26
  • Activos financieros Los activos financieros son activos intangibles Emisor del activo financiero: Es la institución que genera los instrumentos y realiza los pagos futuros de dinero  Préstamo bancario  Bono de tesoro doméstico o externo (soberano)  Bono corporativo  Acción común, doméstica o internacional  Todos los activos financieros señalan un pago al tenedor del activo o al inversionista© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 27
  • Deuda y obligaciones Las obligaciones (rendimiento) que tiene el poseedor de un activo pueden ser:  Una cantidad o renta fija (instrumento de deuda)  Una cantidad variable o residual (acciones comunes) Algunos valores tienen ambas características:  Acciones preferentes (acción que recibe un monto fijo)  Bonos convertibles, que permite convertir deuda en acciones  Ambos están considerados en la categoría de renta fija© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 28
  • Activos y Pasivos financieros BONOS Características: Su venta se realiza en forma directa a un sindicato bancario, existiendo un banco director y un banco participante, cumpliendo funciones similares en el caso del crédito No hay banco agente, pues las obligaciones o títulos son al portador La emisión se anuncia públicamente donde se lista: beneficiario, moneda de emisión, cuantía, tipo de interés, vencimiento y bancos subscriptores En las condiciones de cada obligación (bono) se establece la tasa de interés (fijo o variable) Con respecto al vencimiento se establece:  Único o bullet  Con Cupón  Obligaciones o Bonos convertibles a acciones© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 29
  • Características de Emisiones Soberanas (internacionales) •Es un mercado mayor que el nacional •No hay legislación internacional sobre emisiones nacionales •Pueden ser más bajas las tasas de interés pagadas (dependiendo del riesgo país) •Los costos de emisión son más pequeños •Por lo general vencimientos más largos (30 años en el caso de Bradys) •Títulos líquidos© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 30
  • Tangente de Relacion Precio/RendimientoPrecio Rendimiento© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 31
  • Ejemplo de Precio del Bono (P): Precio del bono de US$ 1,000, al 8% a diez periodos, n =10 M=1000 Se requiere una tasa C (cupon) de 80 Rendimiento requerido al vencimiento, (y o r) = 7% ....? TIR (IRR) El precio del bono va en dirección opuesta al cambio en el rendimiento Recordando que el precio del bono es el valor presente del flujo de caja© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 32
  • Ejemplo de Precio del Bono (P): 0,08=C/M 7,02= 0,508= [ (1 − (1 + y ) −n ) / y] Por tanto 1 /(1 + y) n Es igual a 1,07 C / M [(1 − (1 + y ) −n ) / y ] +1 /(1 + y ) n Y llegamos que P =US$ 1,070 por tanto bono se vende a PREMIUM El precio del bono va en dirección opuesta al cambio en el rendimiento Recordando que el precio del bono es el valor presente del flujo de caja Las razones que determinan la volatilidad del bono son el cupon (C) y el periodo de pago ( 5, 10, 20 años)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 33
  • Cual es el Justo Valor de la Inversión •El valor razonable o el devengado? Situación: La inversión redime al final el Valor Nominal Bono de Valor Nominal de US$ 12,000,000, tasa de rendimiento = 3.915% Precio 92.6563% ; Monto neto US$ 11,118,756 Fecha de Compra : O8 / 01 / 2004 Fecha de Vencimiento : 23 / 12 / 2005© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 34
  • Cual es el Justo Valor de la Inversión Días entre fecha de compra y venta : 715 Total por devengar : US$881,244 Devengo diario : US$ 1,233 Si entre la fecha de compra y el cierre del año hay 357 dias. Tasa 4.29% Devengo US$ 440,006 y registro US$ 11,558,762 ? ó al Valor Razonable Ahora ( Hoy ) según informacion recabada en el mercado el precio del papel es 95.92% del Valor Nominal. Es decir, según Valor de Mercado, Nadie me pagaría más de US$ 11,510,400.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 35
  • Como manejamos el riesgo de las inversiones ? Balance de Bancos Centrales –Inversiones: Papeles de Disponibilidad Inmediata / Liquidez / Inversión –En EE.UU. : Activos mayores del FED: Bonos del Tesoro© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 36
  • Inversiones Portafolio RealDIVISAS V.Devengado V.Liquidacion Plazo Maturity RendDisponibilidad Inmediata 254,699,782 254,699,782 1.03REPOS FEDDepositos US$Cuenta CALL (US$, EURO)Fix Bis, T BillsLiquidez 4,717,240,089 4,718,768,527 71.5 0.20 1.113Depósitos US$, T NoesNotas de agencias, Fix BisInversión 4,742,157,079 4,771,816,844 485.9 1.29 2,287Depósitos US$, CAN EURONotas de AgenciasT NotesMETALES 464,338,656 464,334,217 52.8 0.15 0.0047 © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 37
  • Administración del Riesgo de Mercado Riesgo de Tasa de Interés •Controlado en función a la duración del portafolio (Benchmark) ya que un portafolio con un plazo de duración alto esta expuesto a la volatilidad de las tasa de interés. No mayor a 1.5 en promedio. Bueno, afectado por el riesgo sistemático. Riesgo de Tipo de Cambio •Composición de Monedas (papeles) , Diversificación de acuerdo con obligaciones en el pasivo ( Calce iversiones Vs Depósitos ) Riesgo de Liquidez •Composición de Papeles altamente líquidos, inmediata liquidez en el mercado secundario : Treasury T – Bills, Eurobonos. Riesgo de Contraparte •Aprobaciones de directorio, límites según benchmark, evaluación de informes según calificadoras de riesgo. Moodies, Fich , Standard & Poors© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 38
  • Funciones de los Mercados Financieros Mercado Spot o Efectivo es donde se comercia activos financieros para entrega inmediata. Interacción de Oferta y Demanda determina el precio del activo comerciado. Proporciona Liquidez, vale decir un mecanismo para que el inversionista venda su activo. Reduce el Costo de Transacciones, ello asociado a los costos de búsqueda (mercado centralizado) y costos de información.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 39
  • Clasificación de los Mercados Financieros Por Vencimientos de Obligación:  Mercado de Dinero (Money Market), para instrumentos de corto plazo  Mercado de Capitales, para instrumentos de largo plazo Por Naturaleza de la Emisión  Mercados Primarios: Obligaciones recientemente emitidas  Mercados Secundarios: Mercado para emisiones previamente emitidas Por Entrega Inmediata o Futura:  Mercado Spot o Efectivo y Mercado de Derivados Por Estructura Organizacional  Mercado de Mostrador (OTC, Over the Counter) –Mercado grande no reglamentado y disperso  Mercado de Subasta (Bolsa), se fija precio de referencia a horas específicas del día y centralizado© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 40
  • Derivados Un derivado es un contrato financiero, entre dos ó mas partes que se, que se deriva del valor futuro del activo subyacente.  Un contrato de petróleo a futuro (tres meses) por US$ 20 (el subyacente es el petróleo) Para los contratos el poseedor del documento tiene la obligación de comprar o vender un activo financiero en tiempo futuro (deriva su valor de esa obligación) Dos tipos básicos de instrumentos derivados:  Contratos a futuro  Contratos de opción© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 41
  • Segmento del Mercado de Divisas Operaciones al Contado (Spot)  La entrega de divisas se efectúa en un plazo no superior a dos días laborables. Operaciones a Plazo (Forward)  Aquellas en el que el plazo de entrega es superior a dos días hábiles, fijándose previamente el tipo de cambio de la operación.  La principal función es la cobertura del riesgo de cambio. Por lo general plazos múltiplos de 30 días. Operaciones Swap  Operaciones que se componen de dos transacciones simultaneas, una de de contado y otra de plazo. Como en los tipos de cambio, los bancos cotizan la tasa de interés a tasa de tomador y comprador.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 42
  • Contratos Forward Este obliga al vendedor (comprador) a entregar (comprar) en una fecha futura una determinada cantidad de moneda En el momento del acuerdo se determina el F(forward), que se pagará en t meses y da equivalencia HOY a E(ept) Existen tres opciones de financiamiento del mercado de forwards:  Fondos de caja corrientes  Fondos de caja futuros derivados de la operación  No existencia de recursos y el dinero (dólares) se consiga en el mercado de forwards (futuros)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 43
  • Contratos Forward Asímismo, los Forwards como instrumento financiero presenta la siguiente estructura en función de los siguientes términos  Fecha de Vencimiento: Según transacción  Método de Transacción: Contratación y negociación directa entre comprador y vendedor (Over the counter)  Garantías: No existe Mercado Secundario: No existe  Cumplimiento del contrato: Mediante la entrega por diferencias  Institución Garante: los propios contratantes  Precio de compra de un contrato de compra forward se determina por: n/360 PVF = PVS ( 1+ TIP $ / 1+ TIA S/. )  Precio de compra de un contrato de venta forward se determina por: n/360 PVF = PVS ( 1+ TIA S/. / 1+ TIP $ )© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 44
  • Contrato de Futuros Un acuerdo entre dos partes, por la que estas se comprometen a entregar un determinado producto, especificado en cantidad, calidad, fecha y precio previamente pactado. La función central de los contratos a futuro es la cobertura de riesgo (hedging) producido por las variaciones de precios En el Perú, en el 2000 recién se ha planteado un mercado de productos y por ende futuros  Lo que es crítico es la homogeneidad del producto transado (barriles de petróleo, granos de café, cobre)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 45
  • Características de Contrato de Futuros Los productos son estandarizados  La especificación del producto tanto en cantidad y calidad: esta es condición necesaria para el mercado de futuros Precios se forman de manera transparente  Establecido al cierre del contrato Múltiples ofertantes y demandantes Fecha y sistema de pago o liquidación (settlement)  Los contratos se liquidan a la fecha del vencimiento, pero se requiere una garantía inicial y una garantía de mantenimiento (10% del valor)  La garantía de mantenimiento abona diferencias entre precio de mercado y precio pactado, tanto para el comprador como al vendedor, siempre es una garantía en efectivo, asi se atenúa el riesgo crediticio. Operaciones se realizan de manera centralizada (clearing house), entidad liquidadora o caja de compensación© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 46
  • Mercado de Forwards en el Perú Factores que contribuirían a demanda:  Cuasi dolarización de la economía peruana (2/3) del crédito es en US dólares  Empresas corporativas, p.e. Telefónica  Importadores Factores que contribuirían a oferta:  Banca múltiple y banca de inversión  Exportadores© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 47
  • Mercado de Forwards en el Perú Problemas en el mercado de Forwards •Sobreestimación de riesgo cambiario y de riesgo de solvencia (riesgo país) •Por ello elevadas tasas de forward, a pesar de que tasas contado (spot) no reflejan dichas tasas •Desequilibrio entre oferta y demanda encarece el costo del forward, reduce los niveles de negociación Soluciones •Centralización de operaciones en la bolsa, y no que este descentralizado como es ahora •Ello lleva a menores costos transaccionales •Rol de SBS y BCRP para hacer pública tasas de forward, reducir ruido y mayor transparencia© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 48
  • Contratos de SWAPUn swap es un acuerdo entre dos partes o más para intercambiar flujosde efectivo a lo largo de un periodo de tiempo.Los flujos de efectivo de las contrapartes están atadas generalmente al valorde instrumentos de deuda o al valor de monedas extranjeras.El contrato swap no es un contrato de préstamo, es exclusivamente unintercambio de flujos, ya sean estos de tasa de interés o tipos de cambiofuturos.El principal recibe el nombre de nocional principal (notional principal)El motivo de la exclusión es el reducir el riesgo. Solo se ve afectado elcrediticio (el interés)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 49
  • Características de Contratos de SWAPSProblemas Centrales:  La elección del precio al swap que proporcione una recompensa por asumir el riesgo  El manejo de cartera de swapsLos mercados de swaps, a semejanza de los de forward no son centralizados como sonlos mercados de futuros o bonos (son hechos a la medida de las contrapartes)La calidad, cantidad, fecha y lugar de entrega son negociados por ambas partesLas operaciones son descentralizadas (privadas)Comprador y vendedor pueden ser conocidos (aunque hay brokers)La operación no se puede liquidar en cualquier momento, salvo el consentimiento de laspartesNo hay supervisión sobre pagosHay organismo autoregulador : International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA) © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 50
  • Tipos de SWAPSDe tasa de interésEl pago si al cabo de un año se realizasen, sólo se transfiere el pago neto (ladiferencia entre las dos obligaciones)De Divisas ( currency rate)Una parte mantiene una moneda y desea cambiar a otra moneda.Parte A: tiene euros Parte B : tiene dólaresLas dos partes intercambian efectivo. La razón es la necesidad de fondos endiferentes monedasDe Materias PrimasLa creación de swaps de materias primas separa el riesgo del factor precio (queafecta la valuación de la empresa) y el riesgo crediticio.De Índices BursátilesIntercambio del rendimiento del mercado de dinero (money market) al mercadobúrsatil (stock exchange)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 51
  • Ventajas de los SWAPSFuentes de Financiamiento Empresas nacionales tienen fuentes de financiamiento en el mercado doméstico y empresas extranjeras y mercados foráneos Ambas pueden obtener créditos preferentes en sus mercados domésticos y hacer swaps de tasas de interés Una vez obtenida la tasa preferente, puedo comprar monedas y de allí hacer un swap de monedas con mejor financiamientoSi bien este no es un mercado centralizado como el de futuros o bonos, cabela posibilidad de que brokers busquen a la contraparte de un swap.El riesgo de la operación es del intermediario del swap ( SWAP BANK)Habrá mayor cantidad de brokers si hay más condiciones de arbitraje© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 52
  • Currency Swap – (1) Supongamos que U.S. MNC desea financiar la expansion de su planta en UK por £10,000,000. Pueden endeudarse en dollars en U.S. donde son conocidos y después cambiar los $ por las £.  Esto causa un riesgo de cambio: financiar un proyecto con ingresos en libras esterlinas con dólares. Podrian endeudarse en libras esterlinas en el mercado internacional, pero tendrían que pagar una sobretasa ya que no son tan conocidos.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 53
  • Currency Swap – (2) Si encuentran una firma inglesa con requimiento de financiamiento similar, ambas empresas se podrían beneficiar de un swap. Si el tipo de cambio spot es S0($/£) = $1.60/£, la empresa de U.S. necesita una empresa inglesa que requiera un financiamiento por $16,000,000. Dos empresas multinacionales: A (US) and B (UK). Ambas empresas desean financiar proyectos de la misma envergadura en los paises del otro. Sus oportunidades de endeudamiento son: $ £ Company A 8.0% 11.6% Company B 10.0% 12.0%© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 54
  • Currency swap – (3) Swap Bank $8% $9.4% £11% £12% $8% Firm Firm £12% A B $ £ Company A 8.0% 11.6% Company B 10.0% 12.0%© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 55
  • Currency swap – (4) Posicion neta Swap de A es Bank endeudarse a $8% $9.4% £11% £11% £12% $8% Firm Firm £12% A B A ahorra $ £ £.6% Company A 8.0% 11.6% Company B 10.0% 12.0%© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 56
  • Currency swap – (5) La posicion neta de Swap B es endeudarse al Bank $9.4% $8% $9.4% £11% £12% $8% Firm Firm £12% A B $ £ B ahorra Company A 8.0% 11.6% $.6% Company B 10.0% 12.0%© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 57
  • Currency swap – (6) 1.4% de $16 mm Margen del Swap financiados con 1% swap bank Bank de £10 mm por año por 5 años $8% $9.4% £11% £12% $8% Firm Firm £12% A S0($/£) = $1.60/£, es la A ganancia de $64,000 por años B por 5 años $ £ Company A 8.0% 11.6% Company B 10.0% 12.0%© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 58
  • Riesgos involucrados Riesgo de Interes: el swap bank puede verse afectado si sólo a podido colocar un “lado” de la operacion. Basis Risk: Si las tasas de interes involucradas no estan “colgadas” a la misma base. Riesgo de cambio: en el ejemplo, la posición del swap bank puede deteriorarse si la libra esterlina se aprecia. Riesgo de credito: que una de las partes entre en default. Riesgo soberano: en operaciones internacionales. Riesgo de calce: cuando las operaciones no calzan exactamente, el swap bank tiene que cubrir cualquier diferencia.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 59
  • Contratos de OpciónUna opción es un contrato que da derecho a su poseedor a vender ocomprar un activo a un precio determinado durante un periodo o en fechadeterminadaEn 1973 comienza a operar el CBOE, (Chicago Board Options Exchange)En 1977, se crea la EOE, (European Option Exchange), en AmsterdamLas opciones incorporan derechos de compra: CALL (opción de compra)Las opciones incorporan derechos de venta: PUT (opción de venta)El activo sobre el que se instrumenta la opción se denomina activo subyacenteEl precio de compra o de venta garantizado en la opción se llama precio deejercicio (strike price)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 60
  • Características de los contratos de opcionesLas opciones pueden comerciarse tanto en un mercado centralizado (bolsa) como en un mercado over the counter (OTC) o descentralizadoOpciones en bolsa tienen diversas ventajas:  El exercise o strike price (precio de ejercicio) y la fecha de venta o compra son estandarizadas  La relación de compra y venta se hace a traves de una caja de compensación (clearing house)  Una vez que es una operación estándar, los costos de transacción son menores A diferencia del mercado de futuros o de forwards, el comprador de la opción tiene el derecho y no la obligación de realizar la operación y por eso paga el “derecho a una opción”Esta es la máxima pérdida si es que el precio de mercado es diferente del precio de ejercicioPreferencia por futuros y forwards, cuando información es mayor y opciones cuando hay información asimétrica© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 61
  • Posiciones en OpcionesShort Position: (Posición Corta) Préstamo de stock que uno no posee y devolución, gano cuando el precio de la acción cae, devuelvo igual cantidad de acciones a menor precio Me presto10 acciones ($10 por acción) y las vendo hoy gano 100. Devuelvo mas tarde acciones, cuando caen a $5 por acción, devuelvo 10, pago 50 y gano 50.Long Position: (Posición Larga) Venta de stock que uno posee, gano cuando el precio de la acción sube, igual cantidad de acciones a mayor precio Hoy compro 10 acciones ($5 por acción) y las compro a 50. Cuando suben a $10 por acción, gano 50 y “pago” los 50 iniciales.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 62
  • Comprar Opciones CallSupongamos que hay una call (opción de compra) de un activo A:Precio de la opción: US$ 3Precio actual: US$ 100Precio de Ejercicio (Strike): US$ 100Si el precio del activo en el dia de expiración es igual o menor que 100, NO SEEJERCITA LA OPCION, y pierdo el derecho de la opción (3)Si el precio del activo en el dia de expiración es mayor que 100 y menor que103, SE EJERCITA LA OPCION, y pierdo entre 0 y 3Si el precio del activo en el dia de expiración es igual 103, SE EJERCITA LAOPCION, y pago el derecho de la opción (3). El inversionista no pierde ni gana.Si el precio del activo en el dia de expiración es mayor que 103, SE EJERCITALA OPCION, y pago el derecho de la opción (3). El inversionista gana.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 63
  • Compra de Call (Opción de Compra) (Buy Call Option o Long Call Position ) Beneficio Ganancia Neta 0 100 103 Precio del Activo Pérdida Neta En Expiracion (Strike Price) -3© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 64
  • Venta de Opciones CallEl vendedor de una opción de compra se dice esta que short call position(posición de compra en corto)La posición pérdidas y ganancias de short call position es totalmente inversode la posición anterior (compra de opción de compra o posición de compra enlargo)La posición Sell Call es similar a la (short position) posición corta en un stock(la diferencia es que ganancias de precio de stock es solo 3 y pérdida puede serel precio del stock Si acción sube a 120, pierdo 20 en short position y pierdo (17) en sell call option Si la acción cae a 70, pierdo 30 en short position y gano 3 en vender call option© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 65
  • Venta de (CALL) o Venta de Opción de Compra (Sell Call Option o Short Call Position) Beneficio 3 Ganancia Neta 0 100 103 Precio del Activo Pérdida Neta En Expiracion (Strike Price)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 66
  • Comprar Opciones PutSupongamos que hay una opción de venta (put) de un activo A:Precio de la opción (put option): US$ 2Precio actual: US$ 100Precio de Ejercicio (Strike): US$ 100Si el precio del activo en el día de expiración es mayor que 100, compradorNO EJERCITA LA OPCION , y pierdo el derecho de la opción (2)Si el precio del activo en el dia de expiración es igual a 100, NO SEEJERCITA LA OPCION, y pierdo 2Si el precio del activo en el día de expiración es menor que 100 y mayor que98, SE EJERCITA LA OPCION, y pago el derecho de la opción (2). Elinversionista pierde entre casi 0 y 2Si el precio del activo en el día de expiración es menor que 98, SE EJERCITALA OPCION, y pago el derecho de la opción (2). El inversionista gana.© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 67
  • Compra de Put (Opción de Venta) (Buy Put Option o Long Put Position) Beneficio Ganancia Neta 0 98 100 Precio del Activo Pérdida Neta En Expiracion (Strike Price) -2© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 68
  • Venta de Opciones Put La posición Sell Put es similar a la (short position) posición corta en un stock (la diferencia es que cubre caídas y reduce ganancias de precio de stock)  Si acción cae a 70 pierdo 30 en short position y pierdo 28 en short put option  Si la accion sube a 120, gano 20 en short position y gano 2 en sell put option Por eso esta posición es llamada SHORT PUT POSITION O POSICION DE VENTA EN CORTO© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 69
  • Venta de Put (Opción de Venta) (Sell Put option o Short Put Position) Beneficio 2 Ganancia Neta 0 Pérdida Neta 98 100 Precio del Activo En Expiracion (Strike Price)© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 70
  • Determinantes del Valor de una OpciónEl periodo de expiración El premio por paridad (el costo de put o call) puede ser mayor en la medida que haya un periodo mayor antes de la expiración de la opciónEl precio del stock corriente (B&S) A mayor precio de stock corriente, mayor el valor del call (opción de compra) y menor el precio del put (opción de venta) Tengo alternativa del stock en expiraciónEl precio de activo de expiración (strike price) (B&S) A mayor precio del activo de expiración, menor el precio del call (opciones de compra) y mayor el precio del put (opción de venta) Tengo alternativa del stock corrienteVolatilidad del stock (B&S) Mayor volatilidad, mayor precio del call (menor precio del put)Tasas de interés A mayor tasa de interés (hoy), menor el valor presente del activo en expiración. Por tanto un menor precio de expiración va a incentivar a mayores precios de call (opciones de compra) y menores precios de put (opciones de venta) © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 71
  • Estrategia Long Straddle: Compra de PUT y Compra de CALL Beneficio Strike COMPRA DE CALL (OPCION DE COMPRA) 0 98 100 102 Precio del Activo En Expiracion (Strike Price) COMPRA DE PUT (OPCION DE VENTA) Perdida© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 72
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 73
  • Reconocimiento Todos los activos/pasivos financieros y los derechos y obligaciones (cuentas por cobrar/pagar) que se surjan como consecuencia de sus instrumentos financieros derivados deben reconocerse en el balance general: Cuando una empresa se hace parte de los arreglos contractuales de un instrumento© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 74
  • Medición inicial del instrumento financiero a su costo… … que es Para los activos financieros Para los pasivos financieros “el valor razonable de la “el valor razonable de la consideración ofrecida” consideración recibida”© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 75
  • Costos de transacción Reconocimiento inicial : Costos Subsecuentes :  Los costos de transacción se  Los costos de venta no se incluyen en la medición consideran para determinar inicial de todos los activos y el valor razonable pasivos financieros© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 76
  • Categorías para clasificar el portafolio de instrumentos financieros Categoría DefiniciónRetenidos para  Activos y pasivos financieros adquiridos principalmentenegociar (activos y para generar una utilidad de las fluctuaciones a cortopasivos) plazo en el precio o el margen del corredor  Instrumentos derivados (no usados como instrumentos de cobertura)Préstamos y cuentas Activos financieros creados por la empresa al proveerlepor cobrar originadas fondos, mercancía o servicios directamente a un deudor, no originados con el propósito de vendersepor la empresa inmediatamente o a corto plazoInversiones retenidas al Activos financieros con pagos fijos o determinables yvencimiento vencimiento fijo que la empresa tiene el propósito y capacidad positivos de retener al vencimientoActivos financieros Activos financieros que no sondisponibles para venta  Préstamos o cuentas por cobrar originadas por la empresa  Inversiones retenidas al vencimiento  Activos financieros retenidos para negociar© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 77
  • Medición subsecuente Activos financieros Pasivos financieros Valor razonable Costo amortizado Excepciones Excepciones Al costo (amortizado): Al valor razonable:  Préstamos y cuentas por cobrar  Pasivos comerciales, incluyendo originados  Instrumentos secundarios  Inversiones retenidas al vencimiento  Activos financieros que no pueden medirse de manera confiable al valor razonable Todos los instrumentos secundarios se miden al valor razonable© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 78
  • La clasificación determina la medida de los activos financieros Retenido para obtener una utilidad Para negociar sí a corto plazo o un instrumento derivado Costo (amortizado) noValor razonable sí Préstamos y Originado por la cuentas por cobrar empresa originados no Intención y capacidad de retener al Disponibles para no sí Retenidos al vencimiento y venta satisface otros vencimiento criterios© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 79
  • La clasificación determina la medida de los pasivos financieros Costo (amortizadoValor razonable Retenido para obtener una utilidad no yes a corto plazo o un Otros pasivos Para negociar instrumento financieros derivado© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 80
  • Reconocimiento de cambios en el valor razonable Patrimonio Estado de resultadosInstrumentos - XderivadosRetenidos para - XnegociarInstrumentos odisponibles para X Xventa* * dependiendo de la elección de toda la empresa Al realizarse y en caso de deterioro, la pérdidas y ganancias siempre se incluyen en el estado de resultados© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 81
  • Pérdidas y ganancias en las partidas no revaluadas al valor razonable Reconocer en el estado de resultados eliminación Activos financieros Deterioro Amortización eliminación Pasivos financieros Amortización© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 82
  • Instrumentos financieros retenidos al vencimiento Activos financieros con:  Pagos fijos o determinables  Vencimiento fijo  La empresa tiene la intención positiva y capacidad de retenerlos al vencimiento La intención y la capacidad han de evaluarse en cada fecha de emisión de informes© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 83
  • ¿Intención de retener al vencimiento? No existe intención positiva de retener al vencimiento Listo para vender el El emisor puede activo financiero en Intención de liquidar a un monto respuesta a cambios retener durante un significativamente en las tasas del período no definido menor al costo mercado, las amortizado necesidades de liquidez, entre otras. Cuando existe un precedente de no continuarcon la intención, los activos financieros no deben clasificarse como retenidos al vencimiento© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 84
  • ¿Capacidad para retener al vencimiento? Ninguna capacidad evidente de retener al vencimiento Recursos financieros Impedimentos inadecuados para legales financiar hasta el (restricciones) vencimiento© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 85
  • Instrumentos financieros retenidos al vencimiento ¿Intención positiva y capacidad de retener al vencimiento? sí ¿Se vendió o transfirió algún instrumento retenido al vencimiento en el año en curso o en los dos años previos? sí no Cercano al vencimiento Clasificar como retenido al Evento especial y aislado sí ¿Se cobró sustancialmente todo el vencimiento y medir al costo principal amortizado O Un monto insignificante en relación con la cartera de retenidos al vencimiento? no Reclasificar todos los instrumentos retenidos al vencimiento como disponibles para venta o negocio y medir al valor razonable © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 86
  • Reclasificación de instrumentos financieros retenidos al vencimiento Ventas antes del Cambio de intención o vencimiento: capacidad: reclasificar TODOS los reclasificar TODOS los instrumentos instrumentos Medir al valor razonable Instrumentos financieros para Instrumentos financieros para negociar la venta© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 87
  • Cómo calcular el costo amortizado Ejemplo  Letra del tesoro con un valor nominal de $ 100,000, vencimiento a 5 años, cupón de interés del 6%  La tasa del mercado en el momento de adquisición es de 7% (=tasa de interés vigente / rendimiento al vencimiento)  Precio de adquisición $95,900  Descuento $4,100© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 88
  • Cómo calcular el costo amortizado Ejemplo Amortización Interés del rendimiento Año BB vigente Cupón vigente EB a b=a*7% c=100000*6% d=b-c e=a+d 1 95,900 6,713 6,000 713 96,613 2 96,613 6,763 6,000 763 97,376 3 97,376 6,816 6,000 816 98,192 4 98,192 6,873 6,000 873 99,065 5 99,065 6,935 6,000 935 100,000 Total 34,100 30,000 4,100 1,000 900 Amortización del rendimiento vigente 800 Amortización en línea recta 700 600 1 2 3 4 5© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 89
  • Instrumentos financieros en moneda extranjera Interacción entre la NIC 39 y la NIC 21 Partidas no monetarias (p.ej. Partidas monetarias (p.ej. valores de capital) valores de deuda)  Convertir a la tasa de  Convertir a la tasa de cierre cambio en la fecha de al contado. La diferencia de valuación. Todos los cambio de moneda se cambios se presentan en el presenta en el ingreso de ingreso o el capital de acuerdo con la NIC 21 acuerdo con la NIC 39  Otros cambios se presentan en el ingreso o en el capital de acuerdo con la NIC 39© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 90
  • Clasificación y medición subsecuente Instrumento financiero Medida Cambios de valor No relevante Retenido al vencimiento Costo amortizado (excepto si está deteriorado) Préstamos y cuentas No relevante por cobrar originadas Costo amortizado (excepto si está por la empresa deteriorado) Patrimonio Disponible para la venta Valor razonable P/G o (excepto si está deteriorado o desechado) Retenidos para negociar Valor razonable P/G Instrumentos derivados Valor razonable P/G Pasivos retenidos para negociar Valor razonable P/G Otros pasivos Costo amortizado No relevante© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 91
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 92
  • Deterioro  Un activo esta deteriorado si su valor en libros excede su monto recuperable  Revisar en busca de evidencia objetiva de deterioro a la fecha de cada balance general  Considerar los activos registrados al: - Costo amortizado - Valor razonable …. si se evalúa a través del patrimonio© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 93
  • La evaluación y medición del deterioro requiere un enfoque de dos pasos Paso 1: Paso 2: Evaluación de la evidencia Medición del deterioro objetivo de deterioro  Que devenga interés - ¿Es  Que devenga interés – monto probable que no todos los flujos recuperable basado en los flujos de efectivo se reciban de de efectivo descontados acuerdo con el contrato?  Que no devenga interés –  Que no devenga interés - ¿Es el monto recuperable basado en el valor razonable menor al costo? valor razonable Evaluación de la evidencia Medición del deterioro: no objetiva requiere juicio requiere juicio© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 94
  • Evidencia objetiva  Casos reales (emisor) – Dificultades financieras – Incumplimiento del contrato – Reorganización financiera – Probabilidad de quiebra  Factores cualitativos – Desaparición del mercado activo de valores – Reducción de la clasificación de crédito  Información basada en el patrón histórico de cobros indica que no se cobrará el monto nominal completo de la cartera© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 95
  • Activos registrados al valor razonable – reconocimiento de pérdidas de deterioro Situación A: activo con las ganancias registradas en el capital ∆ Valor ∆ Valor Reversión de ajuste previo razonable razonable para subir al valor razonable en el en el capital capital Depreciación reconocida en Costo P&G Monto de recuperación Período x Período x+1 Período x+2 = valor razonable© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 96
  • Activos registrados al valor razonable – reconocimiento de pérdidas de deterioro Situación B: activo con pérdidas registradas en el capital Depreciación al valor Transferir la depreciación al razonable valor razonable a P&G – previamente reconocida actualmente deterioro en el capital Reconocer el deterioro en P&G Costo Monto de recuperación Período x Período x+1 Período x+2 = valor razonable© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 97
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 98
  • Eliminación de los instrumentos financieros Debe eliminarse un instrumento financiero (incluyendo instrumentos derivados) o parte de éste Activo financiero Se pierde el control por medio de la realización, el ¿Cuándo? vencimiento o la transferencia Pasivo financiero La obligación se elimina: cuando la obligación se liquida, se cancela o vence© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 99
  • Los criterios de eliminación de la NIC 39 pueden tener un impacto significativo en …  Conversiones a valores  Préstamos de valores  Contratos de recompra  Transferencias parciales de activos/pasivos  Transferencias relacionadas con empresas de propósito especial  eliminación conjuntamente con un nuevo activo o pasivo Las reglas de eliminación de la NIC 39 son estrictas© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 100
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 101
  • Necesidad de la contabilidad especial de cobertura La contabilidad de cobertura se aplica cuando la contabilidad normal no provee el momento oportuno correcto de los resultados  Aceleración del reconocimiento de pérdidas y ganancias sobre la partida con cobertura (modelo de cobertura de valor razonable)  Diferimiento de las pérdidas y ganancias sobre el instrumento de cobertura (modelo de cobertura de flujo de efectivo) 1 2 Acum. Partida con cobertura 0 -20 -20 Instrumento de cobertura 20 0 20 20 -20 0© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 102
  • Tipos de coberturasCobertura del valor Cobertura de flujo de Cobertura de unarazonable efectivo inversión neta en una entidad extranjeraPartida con cobertura: Partida con cobertura: Exposición del valor Exposición a la variabilidad Partida con cobertura : razonable del activo o en los flujos de efectivo Cambio en el valor de pasivo reconocido que es atribuible a un una entidad extranjera riesgo en particular debido a diferencias en relacionado con un activo la tasa de cambio de o pasivo reconocido o una moneda transacción proyectada © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 103
  • Riesgos financieros que pueden tener cobertura Activo/pasivo financiero Activo/pasivo no financiero Componente del riesgo:  Riesgo de tasa de interés Componente de riesgo de moneda extranjera (punto de referencia)  Riesgo de moneda extranjera o  Riesgo de crédito riesgo completo (cambiario  Riesgo de precio del capital crediticio) El riesgo sujeto a cobertura debe eventualmente afectar las entradas© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 104
  • Cobertura de instrumentos financieros Cobertura de instrumentos Excepción  Instrumentos derivados  Opciones por escrito (netas) (transacciones con terceros externos)  Activos/pasivos financieros principales sólo con respecto a una cobertura del riesgo de moneda extranjera© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 105
  • Requisitos para una contabilidad especial de cobertura  La relación de cobertura ha de documentarse formalmente  Ha de esperarse que la cobertura sea sumamente eficaz (≈100%)  La eficacia ha de poderse medir confiablemente  La cobertura ha de permanecer sumamente eficaz (80% -125%)  Con respecto a la cobertura de una transacción pronosticada, la transacción ha de ser sumamente probable ¡Las reglas son estrictas! Debe considerarse el costo/beneficio de la contabilidad de cobertura© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 106
  • Documentación necesaria para una contabilidad de cobertura Se requiere documentación formal al comienzo de la cobertura y ésta ha de incluir:  Identificación del instrumento de cobertura y de la partida o transacción sujetas a cobertura  La naturaleza del riesgo que se somete a cobertura  El objetivo de administración de riesgos y la estrategia para efectuar la cobertura  Cómo se evaluará la eficacia© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 107
  • Eficacia de la operación de cobertura No se usa contabilidad de cobertura 125% Contabilidad de cobertura; ineficacia en P&G 100% Contabilidad de cobertura; ineficacia en P&G 80% No se usa contabilidad de cobertura© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 108
  • Probabilidad de la transacción pronosticada Escala de probabilidad de la transacción pronosticada Las pérdidas y ganancias acumulativas permanecen en el Continuación de la capital; descontinuar contabilidad de la contabilidad de Pérdida/ganancia al cobertura cobertura estado de resultadosCompromiso Sumamente Se espera No va a firme probable que ocurra ocurrir © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 109
  • Cuando una cobertura cesa de ser eficaz Si el criterio actual sumamente eficaz falla, se descontinúa la contabilidad de cobertura  La actividad de cobertura registrada antes de la pérdida de la eficacia no se afecta  La cobertura no califica para una contabilidad especial en el futuro desde la última vez que se comprobó su eficacia© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 110
  • Modelos de contabilidad de cobertura Cobertura de valor razonable Cobertura de flujo de efectivo Instrumento Cambios en el de valor razonable cobertura: valor razonable Instrumento Eficaz Capital Cambio de cobertura: Partida con valor cobertura: en el valor razonable valor razonable: después razonable P/G con Ine respecto al fica riesgo z sujeto a P/G cobertura Cobertura de inversión neta similar a cobertura de flujo de efectivo© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 111
  • Reconocimiento de las pérdidas y ganancias diferidas en una cobertura de flujo de efectivo La partida con cobertura es un compromiso firme o transacción proyectada Sí ¿Reconocimiento de un No activo o pasivo? Los montos registrados en el Las pérdidas y ganancias capital deben incluirse en la relacionadas deben considerarse ganancia o pérdida neta en el en la medición inicial del costo de mismo período durante el que el adquisición u otro monto en libros compromiso firme con cobertura o la transacción proyectada afecten AJUSTE DE BASE la pérdida o ganancia neta© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 112
  • Agenda 1. ¿Por qué es tan importante la NIC 39? 2. Alcance de la NIC 39 3. Instrumentos derivados 4. Reconocimiento y medición 5. Deterioro 6. Eliminación 7. Contabilidad de Cobertura 8. Clasificación, compensación y revelaciones © 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza. Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 113
  • ¿Pasivo o capital? Obligación contractual a entregar efectivo u otro activo financiero Interés residual en los activos de la empresa después de deducir bajo condiciones potencialmente sus pasivos no favorables Pasivo capital  Sustancia sobre forma  Evaluar en el reconocimiento inicial  La clasificación continúa hasta la venta© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 114
  • Ejemplos de clasificación de instrumentos financieros ¿Son éstos pasivos o capital?  Instrumento perpetuo: el interés se paga perpetuamente  Bono convertible: bono + opción a convertirlo a acciones de capital  Acciones preferentes redimibles: el tenedor tiene derecho a exigir su redención© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 115
  • Compensar un activo y pasivo financieros cuando existe … Un derecho legalmente aplicable a compensar & Una intención de liquidar al valor neto o realizar el activo y liquidar el pasivo simultáneamente© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 116
  • Generalmente no se compensan…  Acuerdos maestros de liquidación al valor neto  Diversos instrumentos que se usan para emular a un solo instrumento (instrumento sintético)  Partidas que tienen el mismo riesgo pero distintas contrapartes  Activos financieros pignorados como colateral con respecto a activos sin recurso  Activos colocados en un fideicomiso para liquidar un pasivo que no han sido aceptados por el acreedor (arreglos de fondo de amortización)  Obligaciones resultantes de pérdidas recuperables por medio de seguro© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 117
  • Revelaciones bajo la NIC 32 Enfoque de paso por paso Identificar los instrumentos financieros  Revelar los términos, condiciones y políticas Considerar los riesgos  Discutir el enfoque a medir y administrar los riesgos  Revelar la exposición a tasas de interés y el riesgo de crédito Revelar los valores razonables  De todos los instrumentos cuyo valor en libros no sea el valor razonable© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 118
  • La NIC 39 complementa los requisitos de revelación de la NIC 32  Políticas de exposición de riesgo y de administración de riesgo  Revelaciones detalladas de contabilidad de cobertura  Partidas significativas de ingreso, gastos, pérdidas y ganancias  Otras revelaciones significativas Es posible que sea necesario actualizar los sistemas para recopilar la información necesaria© 2003 KPMG International, cooperativa suiza.Derechos reservados. IAS Advisory Services NIC 39 & 32 - 119