Student n0 217716

RELV210
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Religion and the adaptation of Catholic
and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A.,
1840–1960

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Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960
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Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960

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Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960

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Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960

  1. 1. Student n0 217716 RELV210 ! Religion and the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities in the U.S.A., 1840–1960 ! ! ! Regarding religiosity the United States is considered as an exception amongst industrialized countries. Indeed, the feeling of religious belonging is far more important in the United States than it is in Europe, for instance. There are more than 80 million Protestants, 65 million Catholics, 6 million Jews and 3 million Muslims. In a certain way, the United States is the biggest protestant country in the world, but also the biggest Jewish country and one of the biggest Catholic countries (Lherm 2005). The historical formation of the United States is also closely bound to immigration because of the huge proportion of the population they represented in the past centuries. Migrants are not only a part of American history; they are this history (Ahlstrom 1970:515). The immigrants’ religions were often different from the one of the first settlers, and they have been fighting to show that their religions can adapt to what is usually called “the American values”. They were determined to show that believing in another religion and still being a true American was possible. Focusing upon how two religious groups (Catholics and Jews) have melted into the society will allow us to understand how they adapted and how they dealt with xenophobia. The period 1840–1960 corresponds to the period between the arrival of the first wave of migrants (essentially Irish) and the acceptation and adaptation of the first non-Protestant – John Fitzgerald Kennedy, a Catholic – to the US Presidency. In this paper, I will try to explain what has been the role of religion in the adaptation of Catholic and Jewish minorities to the American way of life and its idiosyncratic individualist culture. !

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