Promoting e books to students in an academic library
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Promoting e books to students in an academic library

on

  • 851 views

Presented at SCRCL's "eBooks & eReaders ... Now!" online conference, Apr 23, 2013

Presented at SCRCL's "eBooks & eReaders ... Now!" online conference, Apr 23, 2013

Statistics

Views

Total Views
851
Views on SlideShare
805
Embed Views
46

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

1 Embed 46

http://www.scoop.it 46

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • “Essentially, DRM allows a copyright holder to control what someone else can do with their intellectual property, no matter where the work is located”

Promoting e books to students in an academic library Promoting e books to students in an academic library Presentation Transcript

  • Promoting eBooks to Studentsin an Academic LibraryMaria SavovaCollection Management& Digital Integration LibrarianApril 23, 2013
  • • Five undergraduatecolleges• Two graduateuniversities• ~ 7000 students• One Library• ~ 1,000,000 print books• ~ 400,000 e-books• ~ 70,000 e-journals• Graduate university -Eleven faculties andeleven schools• ~ 38,000 students• One Library with 12branches and collections• ~ 3,600,000 print books• ~ 876,000 e-books + over1 million e-theses• Close to 90,000 e-journals
  • Reasons Why Students Had Not Used anE-BookGregory C.L. 2008. “’But I want a real book’: Aninvestigation of undergraduates usageand attitudes toward electronic books”.Reference and User Services Quarterly. 47(3): 266-273.
  • 1. Awareness"Never heard of them.""Just found out about them."2. Preference for Print"Traditional books are morereliable.""Books are more convenient."3. Eyestrain"Staring at the computer isuncomfortable.""Dont like reading offcomputer screen."4. No Need"I have just never really had areason or needed to use an e-book.""If its not required, I probablywont use it."5. Ease of Access"Hard to access.""Easier to get a book instead ofsitting in front of a computer orprinting a lot."Top five categories, listed by frequencyfollowed by example responses
  • 1. Awareness"Never heard of them.""Just found out about them."2. Preference for Print"Traditional books are morereliable.""Books are more convenient."3. Eyestrain"Staring at the computer isuncomfortable.""Dont like reading offcomputer screen."4. No Need"I have just never really had areason or needed to use an e-book.""If its not required, I probablywont use it."5. Ease of Access"Hard to access.""Easier to get a book instead ofsitting in front of a computer orprinting a lot."Top five categories, listed by frequencyfollowed by example responses
  • Any item owned by the Library from any course materials’ list is identifiedin the Course Reserves sub-catalogue.Expanded Course Reserves Service at McGill
  • Course Adopted Books service atClaremont Colleges LibraryRequired and recommendedreadings list provided byfaculty to the CampusBookstore.Spring 2013 list containedapprox. 2400 titles70% were already owned30% were purchased96 (~4%) titles duplicated ase-books68%2%26%4%Owned in printOwned as e-bookPurchased in print onlyPurchased in both print and as e-book
  • E-book CABs141 Course Adopted Books in electronic format88 from EBL(~60% of all EBL e-books)53 from Ebrary(0.08% of all Ebrary e-books)1771Available only as e-bookAvailable also in print2825Available only as e-bookAvailable also in print
  • Usage of CAB e-books# of sessions# of section requestsBrowsing - # of usersand minutesReading online - # ofusers and minutesDownloading - # ofusers and days
  • 48 (55%)7 (12%)55 (37%)40 (45%)53 (88%)93 (63%)0102030405060708090100CAB non-CAB All EBL e-booksEBL e-books usage Jan-Mar 2013used not used
  • 3.609.843.65257.214.3118.411.710.861.000.001.501.500.00 50.00 100.00 150.00 200.00 250.00 300.00Browse - average user count per bookBrowse - average min per bookRead online - average user count per bookRead online - average min per bookDownload - average user count per bookDownload - average # of days per bookComparison in usage of CAB andnon-CAB EBL e-booksnon-CAB (7) CAB (48)
  • 28%98% 98%72%2% 2%0%20%40%60%80%100%120%CAB (53) non-CAB (65,103) Total (65,156)Ebrary e-books usage Jan-Mar 2013not used used
  • 6.42123.662.1439.48020406080100120140Average # of sessions per book Average # of section requests per bookComparison in usage of CAB andnon-CAB Ebrary e-booksCAB (38) non-CAB (1328)
  • 24%14%21%42%Comparison in usage of print and e-CABsNot used Only p- Only e- Both p- and e-
  • 63%55%38%45%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%e-CABs usage p-CABs usageComparison in usage of print and e-CABsUsed Not used
  • Comparing usage of print and e-books
  • Comparing usage of print and e-booksPrint books:o length of loanperiodo # of circulationsin dayso # of renewalso # of times thebook is re-shelved – i.e.internal useE-books• Ebraryo # of sessionso # of section requests• EBLo Browsing - # of users andminuteso Reading online - # of usersand minuteso Downloading - # of usersand days
  • Number of users borrowed / accessed printand e-CABs – average per used title0.49 0.75 0.7152.535.37 4.620.0010.0020.0030.0040.0050.0060.00Link+ requests Total Checkouts Total Renewals Browse online(# of users)Read online(# of users)Download(# of users)PRINT BOOKS E-BOOKS
  • Usage of print and e-CABs –average per title2611196150 50 100 150 200 250Average number of days borrowed (incl. Link+)Average # of days downloadAverage number of min reading onlineAverage number of min browsing online
  • 1. Awareness"Never heard of them.""Just found out about them."2. Preference for Print"Traditional books are morereliable.""Books are more convenient."3. Eyestrain"Staring at the computer isuncomfortable.""Dont like reading offcomputer screen."4. No Need"I have just never really had areason or needed to use an e-book.""If its not required, I probablywont use it."5. Ease of Access"Hard to access.""Easier to get a book instead ofsitting in front of a computer orprinting a lot."Top five categories, listed by frequencyfollowed by example responses
  • • "I would rather have the book on hand."• "Would rather read in bed or on the couch oron the beach - not at a computer.“Gregory C.L. 2008. "But I want a real book: An investigation ofundergraduates usage and attitudes toward electronic books".Reference and User Services Quarterly. 47 (3): 266-273.Why students prefer print books
  • • Purchased 5 Sony Readers in Jan 2010• Launched Pilot project in Mar 2010 Available to McGill students, faculty andstaff Equipment, rather than content• Purchased 100 more devices in May 2010• Launched the full service in Sep 2010• Preloaded selected Public domaincontent, but open for loading any of thecompatible library e-book content.McGill’s E-Readers Loan ServicePhoto credit: Klaus Fiedler
  • or• McGill Library chose a device that is compatible with alreadyowned content• The Library started purchasing more content compatible withthe e-readershttp://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=hen&ctt=1#ai:MP900180494|mt:2|http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=egg&ctt=1#ai:MP900314021|mt:2|Targeted collection development
  • Turnover of OverDrive e-books at McGill05001000150020002500300035004000Sep 2009 Feb 2010 Mar 2010 Apr 2010 May2010Aug 2010 Sep 2010 Oct 2010 Nov 2010 Dec 2010 Sep 2011 Sep 2009-Sep 2011363 379 403 406 406 423 432 491963 1008 1142 1142134 130 143 89 119 126 179 169 185 183 1873892E-books owned Checkouts0.000.501.001.502.002.503.003.50Sep 2009 Feb 2010 Mar 2010 Apr 2010 May2010Aug2010Sep 2010 Oct 2010 Nov2010Dec 2010 Sep 2011 Sep2009-Sep20110.37 0.34 0.35 0.22 0.29 0.30 0.41 0.34 0.19 0.18 0.163.41Turnover rate(checkouts/e-books owned)
  • Sara Lowe & Char Booth (2012),The Claremont Colleges LibraryStudent Library & Technology Engagement Survey Summary Report
  • Rise of e-reading devices4%12%10%19%26%3%8%10%25%31%6%17% 18%33%40%0%10%20%30%40%50%May-10 May-11 Dec-11 Nov-12 Jan-13Ebook reader Tablet Has either tablet or Ebook readerPresented to: American Library AssociationMidwinter Conference, January 26, 2013
  • Sara Lowe & Char Booth (2012),The Claremont Colleges LibraryStudent Library & Technology Engagement Survey Summary Report
  • Sara Lowe & Char Booth (2012),The Claremont Colleges LibraryStudent Library & Technology Engagement Survey Summary Report
  • Library e-Content on the go:Research with Mobile DevicesMaria SavovaCollection Management and Digital Integration Librarian
  • Mobile Reading Devices• Internet capable2G/3G/4G data plans vs. Wi-Fi onlySmartphones Tablets iPod Touch Some e-readers• Not Internet capableSony Reader Kobo B&N Nook Cybook iLiad Libre
  • Connecting to library e-resources off campus• Institutional Wireless Network• Virtual Private Network (VPN)• Web-based Proxy authentication
  • Accessing e-ContentDirect download – view offline Download and transfer – view offlineView online
  • Electronic FormatsOnline Only vs. DownloadableVS.
  • Reflowable e-Book FormatsEPUB – format standard fordigital publishingCompatible with almost every devicebut the Amazon KindleAZW Kindle FormatCompatible with the Amazon Kindle(device and reading apps)
  • Converting PDFs intoe-Reader Friendly FormatsApplication on ScienceDirect Free ebook management software
  • http://office.microsoft.com/en-ca/images/results.aspx?qu=lock&origin=FX010132103#ai:MP900433153|DRM - Digital Rights Management
  • Step 1: Create a free Adobe ID
  • Direct download of DRM-protected e-books
  • Organizing Ebrary content online
  • E-books research guide
  • http://scholarship.claremont.edu/Savova, M. and Garsia, M. (2012). McGill Library makes e-booksportable. E-readers’ Loan Service in Canadian academic library.portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12 (2), 205-222.Canuel, R., Crichton, C. & Savova, M. (2012). Chapter 6: Tabletsas Powerful Tools for University Research. Teaching the RelevantSkills. Library Technology Reports, 48(8), 35-41.
  • THANKYOU!“Kali, Avatar of the eBook” by Javier Candeirahttp://www.flickr.com/photos/hiperactivo/3644097750/sizes/o/in/photostream/maria_savova@cuc.claremont.edu