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The real pirates of the Caribbean; A Golden Age
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The real pirates of the Caribbean; A Golden Age

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Who were they? What was their impact from the 1600s to the 1720s in this region? Were they romantic, honorable, successful, admirable, glamorous? You will decide.

Who were they? What was their impact from the 1600s to the 1720s in this region? Were they romantic, honorable, successful, admirable, glamorous? You will decide.

Published in: Travel

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  • 1. A GOLDEN AGE ?
  • 2.  Buccaneers  Pirates  Privateers  French Corsairs  Dutch Sea Beggars  English Sea Dogs  Action in the Caribbean spanned from 1500s to 1830s but  GoldenAge was from 1650 to 1730
  • 3.  Profiteering  Political  Religious
  • 4.  Spanish: Cartagena, Havana, Santiago de Cuba, San Juan, Maracaibo, Santo Domingo,Trinidad; Porto Bello in Panama andVeracruz in New Spain  English: Barbados, St Kitts, Nevis; later Jamaica, Bermuda, Antigua, Montserrat and Eleuthera  French: Bahamas,Tortuga, Petit-Goave in Hispaniola (Haiti today); Guadeloupe and Martinique  Dutch:Trinidad, Curacao
  • 5.  Changes in Demographics  Spanish Ports  Protestant Ports  European Struggles
  • 6.  European dynastic intrigue and warfare  Colonial governors turned to buccaneers  Port Royal, Jamaica: English pirate haven  Guadeloupe and Martinique (LesserAntilles); Tortuga andWestern Hispaniola: French pirate haven  Trinidad: Dutch Pirate haven  Nassau, New Providence: all pirates haven
  • 7.  Jean Fleury  Francois Le Clerk: ‘Jambe de Bois’  EdwardThatch,Teach, or Drummond: ‘Blackbeard’  Henry Morgan  Stede Bonnet: ‘The Gentleman Pirate’  CharlesVane  ‘Calico Jack’ Rackham  Anne Bonny and Mary Read  Edward (Ned) Low  William ‘Captain’ Kidd  Bartholomew Roberts
  • 8.  French privateer  Spain’s nemesis  Captured most of Moctezuma’s treasure, 1522  Captured many Spanish vessels  He was captured and executed in 1527
  • 9.  French  Formidable privateer  Nicknamed ‘Jambe de Bois’  Ransacked Porto Santo, 1552  Pillaged and burned down Santo Domingo, 1553  Plundered Santiago de Cuba and Panama, 1554  Settled in SaintTomas  Killed in 1563
  • 10.  English, born c. 1680  Operated off the coast of N.A: 1714-18  Frigate ‘Queen Anne’s Revenge’  Placed slow-burning fuses under hat and on beard: ‘fiendish apparition from Hell’  Killed by British officer and crew:5 bullets and 20 slashes
  • 11.  Welsh  Pirate and Privateer  Attacked and captured the City of Panama  English hero  Titled nobleman  Enormous sugar plantation in Jamaica  Died in his bed, rich and respected
  • 12.  Barbadian, English family  ‘The Gentleman Pirate’  Sugar planter turned pirate in 1717  Sailed with Blackbeard as guest or prisoner  Captured and hanged
  • 13.  English  Operated out of Nassau  Rebelled against governor Rogers  His quartermaster was Calico Jack Rackham  Calico Jack deposed him  Captured and hanged in Jamaica, 1720
  • 14.  English  Invented the skull and crossed swordsflag  Anne Bonny’s lover/husband/crew member  Mary Read: 2nd crew member  Operated in Bahamas  Captured and hanged in 1720
  • 15.  Irish  Pirate but never captain  Sailed under command of Calico Jack  Ruthless and fierce  Sensational trial in Jamaica, 1720  Escaped execution for being pregnant  Gave birth and disappeared
  • 16.  English  Brutal pirate  In 3 years, captured over 100 ships  Tortured many people  His crew mutinied in 1724  He was rescued by a French vessel  Was hanged on Martinique
  • 17.  Scottish (c.1645-1701)  Privateer and pirate?  Prominent citizen in NY  BecameCaptain after mutiny  Ship named ‘Blessed William’  Killed one crewman  Buried treasure?  Hanged 1701 after sensational trial
  • 18.  Welsh  Most successful  Sank or captured about 459 ships  Plagued the Caribbean until 1722  Ships: ‘Fortune’  Returned to Africa and died in naval battle, 1722
  • 19.  1. Equal vote and equal shares  2. Cheating: nose and ears split and marooned  3. No gaming for money  4. Candles to be put out at eight  5. All weapons to be kept clean and ready  6. No boys or women on board: penalty of death  7. Deserting ship in battle: death or marooning
  • 20.  8. No quarreling on board: rules for dueling  9. No talking about quitting: payment for injuries  10. Prizes: captain and quartermaster 2 shares; master gunner and boatswain 1 ½ shares; other officers 1 ¼ shares; rest ‘gentlemen of fortune’: 1 share  11. Musicians to rest on the Sabbath Day
  • 21.  Adventurous  Cross-section of society  Uneducated  Escaping dictatorial ships  Democratic; vote  Wealth equally divided: proportionally more for captain and officers  Punishment: flogging, hanging; dragged by ropes  Drink and fight  No women aboard  Took mostly clothes, weapons and supplies  No burying of treasures
  • 22.  Hunger/thirst/cold  Diet of kidney beans with maggots  Lack of vitamins  Loss of teeth, spots  Scurvy  Surrounded by dead bodies  Solace in rum  Society operated outside normal laws
  • 23.  English Royal Navy and Spanish Guardacosta  Nassau: last pirates’ haven in Caribben  Lafitte brothers operated fromTexas and Louisiana in 1810s  Privateers profited during LatinAmerican Wars of Independence  Steam propulsion ships and strength of US Navy eliminated all piracy by the 1830s
  • 24.  Were they romantic?  Were they honorable?  Were they successful?  Were they admirable?  Were they glamorous?
  • 25.  billmar@cfl.rr.com