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Digital Six Sigma vs Directed Innovation

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Cannes, 2012, World Innovation Convention Workshop slides

Cannes, 2012, World Innovation Convention Workshop slides

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  • Note: animated slides are denoted on the slide using the mouse graphic below. The number identifies the number of clicks required to step through the animation (4 clicks in the example below).  4
  • Executives learn best by doing. This session provides a hands on experience with DSS so you can see the magic, and develop the mindset for leading DSS.
  • Compare/Contrast Variation with Diversity Less variation = more efficiency = more time to create diverse thought = Creativity
  • Slide is animated: 6 clicks to step through the text on the slide.
  • Instructor notes: be prepared to explain where targets came from-still right number and why…… what does deployment team look like-will be examining in more detail later, deployment team represents infrastructure for DSS to succeed.
  • Jeff – add evolutionary step of how this evolved from Plan, Do, Check, Act model…show a family tree for each of DSS and DI DMADV – Define, Measure, Analyze, Design, Verify Go to Index   A business management approach and a fundamental component of the Six Sigma business philosophy. DMADV is a five-step method for ensuring that products or processes adhere to Six Sigma quality levels (i.e., no more than 3.4 defects per million opportunities), generally by improving methodologies: 1) Define (objectives and deliverables, both internal and external); 2) Measure (customer needs and expectations); 3) Analyze (options available to fulfill customer expectations); 4) Design (the process to fulfill customer expectations); and 5) Verify (design performance and ability to fulfill customer expectations).
  • DMADV – Define, Measure, Analyze, Design, Verify Go to Index   A business management approach and a fundamental component of the Six Sigma business philosophy. DMADV is a five-step method for ensuring that products or processes adhere to Six Sigma quality levels (i.e., no more than 3.4 defects per million opportunities), generally by improving methodologies: 1) Define (objectives and deliverables, both internal and external); 2) Measure (customer needs and expectations); 3) Analyze (options available to fulfill customer expectations); 4) Design (the process to fulfill customer expectations); and 5) Verify (design performance and ability to fulfill customer expectations).
  • DMADV – Define, Measure, Analyze, Design, Verify Go to Index   A business management approach and a fundamental component of the Six Sigma business philosophy. DMADV is a five-step method for ensuring that products or processes adhere to Six Sigma quality levels (i.e., no more than 3.4 defects per million opportunities), generally by improving methodologies: 1) Define (objectives and deliverables, both internal and external); 2) Measure (customer needs and expectations); 3) Analyze (options available to fulfill customer expectations); 4) Design (the process to fulfill customer expectations); and 5) Verify (design performance and ability to fulfill customer expectations).
  • Note: Slide is animated. Click 3 times to display to move from DMAIC / DMADDD / DMADV to DFSS
  • Note: slide is animated. Click once to reveal DMADV flow chart. DMADV – Define, Measure, Analyze, Design, Verify Go to Index   A business management approach and a fundamental component of the Six Sigma business philosophy. DMADV is a five-step method for ensuring that products or processes adhere to Six Sigma quality levels (i.e., no more than 3.4 defects per million opportunities), generally by improving methodologies: 1) Define (objectives and deliverables, both internal and external); 2) Measure (customer needs and expectations); 3) Analyze (options available to fulfill customer expectations); 4) Design (the process to fulfill customer expectations); and 5) Verify (design performance and ability to fulfill customer expectations).
  • Note: Slide is animated. Click 3 times to encircle/define Product Portfolio Definition & Development, Product Commercialization and Technology & Software Platform Development.
  • Change is often not “someone’s fault” “ Who” can redefine the what and the context…. Different “who’s” have different “whats” changes in leadership “ What's”: improvements to processes or systems organization restructuring Etc. Internal context is partly culture External context refers to factors outside of company culture, envrionment industry technology customer needs geopolitical issues socioeconomic issues
  • The Growth Curve represents the product lifecycle – or the lifecycle of a company. Following the red curve, companies can fail to change and thereby decline. If they are adaptive enough, they profit from times of growth and change in order to grow continuously (see the blue curve). =============== What is the early DOWN part of the S-curve here? Not the traditional S-curve…source? Performance degradation due to learning curve of new process = original dip. SUMMARIZE the Growth Curve To the extent that change happens in Rapid Growth, it is incremental or continuous change Maturity involves discontinuous change. Questions to ask the class: Where do your products, services, projects and organization currently fit on the growth curve? Where does Motorola as a whole currently fit on the growth curve? What makes change difficult? When is the ideal time to initiate and move to a new s-curve? The need for change does not imply that what we were doing before was wrong Shorten time in formation and maturity, maximize time in rapid growth Anticipate change to avoid declines The time to start change is while in rapid growth
  • Justification of this? Data based? Forcefully communicates not to do DMADV or even Lean.
  • One such factor is transition management. Emphasize that ultimately it is people that go through the change – managing change means getting people to the future state . Point out that there are numerous models explaining the psychology of change, and this is one example illustrating the stages an individual goes through during a change. You can draw the following Boston Matrix on the whiteboard or flipchart: Organizational Gain Using the matrix, we can affect the shape of the transition curve. From the book “Epic Change” Delightful Demanding Discretionary Dangerous L H H Personal Impact
  • Instructor Notes
  • Instructor Notes At this point, open the BCC tool and demonstrate the sections for the participants.
  • Instructor Notes Divide participants into roughly equal size groups of 4-6, staying closer to six for larger classes. Try not to have more than 4 groups. Instruct them to take out the Case study, have them read the Overview section. Instruct them not to read any further. Hand out the Business Case for Change wall chart and have them develop it as a team. Give them 20 mins for the exercise 15 mins for debrief Have a team share their results and get feedback Ask “Did they create a Burning Platform?” why? “ Were they convincing that they would be successful?” why? Ask other teams what they had in their BCC that was different from the other teams. Emphasize that to really do this, support and effort will be necessary to gather the required information/data and to sue the appropriate wording to create a compelling BCC.
  • What is a Critical Customer Requirement? Important to the customer — “customer cares about it”. Value proposition Specifies requirement — “must-have” or “must be” attributes. Ultimately satisfy Potentially delight Can be measured. Establishes a target. Customer specifications Acceptable range of performance For the Voice of the Customer to be useful, we must ultimately convert the VOC data into Critical Customer Requirements that can be used to assess the performance of our processes. If CCRs are not defined to the point that a clear target with specifications is established, they are not useful in determining our current defect levels.
  • Note: slide is animated. Click once to reveal DMADV flow chart.
  • Note: slide is animated. Click once to reveal DMADV flow chart.
  • Note: animated slides are denoted on the slide using the mouse graphic below. The number identifies the number of clicks required to step through the animation (4 clicks in the example below).  4
  • Slide is animated: 6 clicks to step through the text on the slide.
  • Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) in Technology Domain Identify/select team members (10 +/- 2) critical thinkers (problem-oriented) divergent thinkers (creatives) Facilitator process observer objectivity no emotional connectivity to outcome
  • Make the connection to cache memory….
  • EXPLAIN: One of the best minds was Albert Einstein, who advised us: “Don’t Ever Stop Asking Questions.” Einstein was also a good “investigator” who knew that if you asked plenty of questions, you would generate plenty of ideas. Therefore, the following technique should be quite interesting. [Optional: Draw a Question Mark on a flip chart.] NOTES:
  • Examples: 1. Two components and field of interaction - Pizza Box 2. Main Function and Product - Pizza Box 3. System and Supersystem - Toothbrush 4. Engineering Contradiction - Pointer, Pizza Box 5. Operating Principle - Pointer 6. Ideal Model - (example) is at the core of reframing and getting engineers out of the box; a new way of thinking.
  • Note: In the above graphic, “A” = “Secondary” This step in the methodology generates the Ranking. Basic function: A useful function of a component of an engineering system, directed toward the engineering system’s product(s). The Main Function of the Engineering System is a Basic function. Secondary (Auxiliary) function: A useful function of an engineering system component directed toward a component of a Supersystem or environment. Additional function: A useful function directed toward a component of the engineering system being considered. Harmful function: Function that worsens parameters or performance of the engineering system. Calculations of Function Rank Rule 1: If the function acts directly on the Engineering Systems Product(s), the rank of the Function is Basic (B) Rule 2: If the function acts on a component that performs a Basic function, the rank of its action is Secondary 1 (S1) Rule 3: If the function acts on a component that performs an Si function, the rank of the function is Si-1 (Secondary (i-1)) Rule 4: If the function acts on a Supersystem element, the rank of the function is Secondary 1 (S1) (Note: sometimes called Additional functions in special cases)
  • Functionality is increased and cost decreased. Bottom of an S-Curve with a new technology costs more, with more problems and bugs with the system that need to be worked out. Once the value equation is equal, when you see the first people start moving from one curve to the next (may have a couple early adopters before then) T = time; Engineering System Life Span I = Degree of Ideality of the main parameters or Operating Principle supporting the Main Function of the Engineering System Point # 2 is profit point Point #3 is maturity of initial technology You can predict when technology will move from one S-curve to the next (e.g. propeller airplanes did not move to jets until all of the functionality and reliability, plus the cost point made the functionality valuable
  • Better problem definition Also, expanding thinking in solution identification
  • Note: slide is animated. Click once to reveal DMADV flow chart. JEFF FIX DMADDD and Change Management.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Digital Six Sigmaand Directed Innovation Maria Thompson Director, Innovation Strategy Motorola Solutions, Inc. World Innovation Convention November 2012
    • 2. Objectives• Develop an understanding of how the DSS & Directed Innovation methodologies complement each other• Apply at least one DSS and one complementary Directed Innovation technique to solve a valuable problem• Develop action plan(s) for future application of appropriate DSS and/or Directed Innovation methodologies
    • 3. What is Six Sigma?What does Six Sigmamean to you?
    • 4. What is Six Sigma? One Term, Multiple MeaningsBusinessImpact Management System Drive Vital Few Dedicated Resources Data-Driven Decisions Customer Focused Improvement Methodology (DMAIC, DMADV, DMADDD) Metric 3.4 DPMO Literal Philosophical Definition Definition DPMO = Defects per Million Opportunities
    • 5. Minimizing Variation Variation Customer Satisfaction• Minimizing variation is a key focus of Six Sigma.• Variation means that a process does not produce exactly the same result every time the product or service is delivered.• Variation leads to defects, and defects lead to unhappy customers and Cost of Poor Quality.• Variation exists in all processes Data Variation
    • 6. Using Mean and Standard Deviation• Mean (µ) – Average of Values• Standard Deviation (σ) – How far values lie from the mean or average – Standard Deviation is a measure of Variation
    • 7. Six Sigma is Virtual Perfection! Three Sigma Six SigmaAt least 54,000 wrong drug One wrong drug prescription inprescriptions per year 25 years27 minutes of dead air time per 2 seconds of dead air time perTV channel each week TV channel each week5 short or long landings at 1 short or long landing at allO’Hare airport each day U.S. airports in 10 years
    • 8. Where’s The Magic? Status Quo Tools to Drive Subjectivity, Conjecture, Objectivity & Data Driven & Strong Personalities Decisions Step By Step Process Shoot from the Hip, Figure it Out Improvement As We Go, High Variation in “Recipes” Results Variance Based Metrics Vs. No Metrics or Mean Based Metrics Dedicated, Proactive Process Part Time Firefighters Improvement Resources A Leadership Tool: -A Common Language Multiple, Disjointed Initiatives -A Mobilization Platform & -A Catalyst To Drive Change “Hobby” Projects6
    • 9. How is Digital Six Sigma Different?• New Focus – Strategically aimed at Big Y’s with a $3 Billion target• New Organization – Dedicated resource deployment team• New Tools – DMAIC + (Lean, DFSS and Change Management )• New Thinking – Heavy emphasis on leadership and fact-based decisions• New Technology – IT solutions to “hard code” Six Sigma solutions –Digital Cockpits to provide real-time tracking of process performance –E-Learning –Low cost web applications & workflow tools• New Applications – Six Sigma for Product Development
    • 10. DSS Methods Overview DMAIC  Use for improving quality & service problems;Variation & Defect Reduction reducing variation LeanProcess Efficiency  Use for improving process optimization & speed & Speed DFSS New Product &  Use for developing new processes; or radical change Process in process
    • 11. What can we expect from DSS?PerformanceImprovement The Process Half–Life Effect t Lean/100% ovemen inuo us Impr DMADV Discont DMAIC50% nt me r ove s i mp ti nuou Con20% Low Hanging Fruit Traditional Management Ford 8-D 0% (Status Quo) Crisis Crisis-10% 3 6 9 12 months Ray Stata, Sloan Management Review, 1989.
    • 12. How do you know which approach to use?• Often a project team may not know which methodology to use until after the Analyze Phase.• Use DMAIC when… – an existing product, service or process is failing to meet customer requirements or is not performing adequately. – there are opportunities for continuous improvement without radical change – Trying to reduce defects or variation in a process• Use DMADV when… – a process is required but does not exist (or radical change) – an existing process has been optimized using DMAIC but is still failing to meet customer requirements• Use Lean when… – a process is encountering cycle time issues (often transactional) – optimizing a process for speed and efficiency• Use BLITZ when… – quick wins can be implemented to solve the majority of the problem
    • 13. DSS MethodologiesDMAIC / Lean / DMADV The Process  Systematic methodologies focusing on problem solving & continuous improvementDesign For Six Sigma (DFSS) The Product  Systematic methodology focused on creating new products  Often required to achieve true 6σ capability that Customers can see - by reducing variability & preventing problems in the design phase 3
    • 14. Digital Six Sigma Flow Chart Change Management Define Measure Analyze Improve ControlD Business Issue Process Solutions Document &M Case Statement Mapping (VSM) Developed StandardizeAI Team Process Solutions Digitize &C Charter Measurement Selected Draw Down Q y ua Stakeholder l ity e nc Measurement fi ci DOE Analysis Systems Analysis Ef TestingLE Risk Cu Assessment Bu stoA yes Pr sin me Analysis ValueN Cause oc es r Root Customer es s s Information Performance no Achieved New Process no or Product no yesDM BHAGAD Customer Needs Customer Needs Paradigm Ideal QFD QFD Verify & Requirements Analysis DesignV & Requirements 1
    • 15. Six Sigma for Product Development Product Portfolio Product Portfolio Product Product Definition & Definition & Commercialization Commercialization Development DevelopmentBusiness Strategy MFSS P2D2 C D O V ProductMarketing I D E A Launch Strategy DFSS C D O VTechnology Strategy SDFSS I2 D O V TDFSS Technology & Technology & I2 D O V Software Platform Software Platform Development Development3
    • 16. Stakeholders VOC VOB VOP P ? D M D ACha nge Prioritization (Peo I Man Quick ple s Projects Wins agem Decide tuff) E ent T( oP nhce r M ce t j C ci t sl a S gana )ff u A Phase Gate Process e ne m
    • 17. What causes sixsigma projects to fail?
    • 18. The “Define” Phase Is Critical 70% of process initiatives fail due to:Project Selection Lack of alignment with a strategic priority Insufficient reasons for change No financial estimate Can’t be completed in 3-6 months Team Charter No clear & measurable goals Not staffed with the right people or enough time Stakeholder Key stakeholders unwilling to try new solutions Analysis Key stakeholders and managers not committed Risk Assessment Starting projects with no understanding of risk Ignoring early red flags Customer Lack understanding of customer experience & needs Requirements
    • 19. The Elements of Change WHO INTERNAL CONTEXT HOW WHAT EXTERNAL CONTEXT
    • 20. The Growth (“S”) Curve MaturityPerformance Rapid Growth Decline FormationAdapted from Nadler, D. A. (1998) Time
    • 21. 10.90.8 ure0.7 f ail y of0.6 i lit b ab0.5 Pro Risk0.40.30.20.1 0 DMAIC LEAN DMADV
    • 22. Develop An Issue Statement Process Quality Change Reference Characteristic IndicatorProcess that needs What needs Nature of the improvement improvement improvement • Design • Defects • Increase • Accounts Receivable • Cycle Time • Decrease • Order entry • Rework • Improve • Shipping of parts • Efficiency • Reduce • Invoicing • Complaints • Eliminate
    • 23. Project Schematic Example Big Y (VOB) NPI Say/Do NPI Say/Do Little y’s Price Price Unit Volume Unit Volume Manufacturing Manufacturing Development Development <10% >75% Cost Cost <10% Cost Cost <5% Product Launch Product Launch Business Case Business Case Vital X’s Timeliness Effectiveness Timeliness Effectiveness • Resource Management • Customer Insight Process • Work Allocation • Market Size Forecasting DSS Projects • Specs / Requirements • Commercial DOE Testing Management • Digitized M-Gates • “Do” Rescue Tools KitIssue Statement Improve the accuracy of the customer insight process
    • 24. Root Cause Analysis Identification of the few underlying factor(s) causing the problem Identifies the vital X’s driving the Y performance Attacking the top 20% of causes will solve 80% of the effect (80/20 Rule) Avoids implementing quick fixes that only cover up the problem Builds data-driven consensus on prioritized causes
    • 25. DMAIC Reduce Defects using DMAIC
    • 26. Reduce Defects using DMAICObjective• Understand & Measure the sources of defects and variation in your process or product.• Brainstorm potential Root Causes and let the Data guide you to a decision.• Develop solutions that best address the root cause.Key Tools – Affinity Diagram – 5 Why’s – Cause & Effect Diagram (a.k.a. Ishikawa, Fishbone)
    • 27. DSS Methodologies DMAIC  Use for improving quality & service problems;Variation & Defect Reduction reducing variation LeanProcess Efficiency  Use for improving process optimization & speed & Speed DMADV New Product &  Use for developing new processes; or radical change Process in process
    • 28. DMAIC Phases and Tools Define Business Case, Team Charter, Stakeholder Analysis,Opportunities VOC, CCRs, CTQs, SIPOC, Process Maps Measure Baseline Performance, Operational Definitions,Performance Measurement Plan, QFD, Check Sheets Analyze Brainstorming, Root Cause Analysis, Cause & EffectOpportunity Diagrams, Pareto Diagrams, Affinity Diagram Improve Develop solutions, Testing, Confirming solutions, Performance Communication Plan, Solution Matrix Control SPC, Control Charts, Document & Standardize, Performance Control Plan, SOPs, FMEA
    • 29. Brainstorm Causes
    • 30. Affinity DiagramAffinity Diagrams encourage creativity by everyone on theteam at all phases of the process by breaking down long-standing communication barriers. Teams use this type ofdiagram to overcome team paralysis which is brought on byan overwhelming array of options and lack of consensus.When using Affinity Diagrams follow these simple steps: 1. Write the issue under discussion in a full sentence 2. Brainstorm at least 20 ideas or issues 3. Without talking: sort ideas simultaneously into 5-10 related groupings 4. For each grouping, create summary cards using consensus
    • 31. Affinity Diagram Issues Surrounding Returned Orders Our store and equipment We must focus on the order Must be more reliable creation & fulfillment Mechanical Store Environment Order Entry Toppings problems Grill not Toppings too Not enough workers Poor Handwriting Messy at ingredients Hot enough station Not enough Wrong combination Fryer did not Cashiers at front Of toppings Stations are Counter cook french fries Too crowded thoroughly Vegetables not fresh Incorrect written order by cashier Burger Buns are staleTip: Use Post-it Notes when brainstorming the ideas so that they can be moved around more easily.
    • 32. 5 Why’s Using the Cause and Effect diagram with the major categories, begin with the “most likely” — the questioning of “why.” • Why does this occur? • Why does the condition exist? Root Cause – Most Basic Reason a Problem Has or Could Occur 1. Ask “Why” 3-5 times. – Why is this failure mode active? Progressively becomes more difficult and a more thought provoking assignment. Symptom 1 Early questions are usually superficial, obvious;Why did this “why” the later ones more substantive. Symptom 2 happen? “why” Symptom 3 “why” Symptom 4 And more “why’s” Probable Root Cause
    • 33. Example of 5 Why’s• Problem: Order returned due to cold food. Why is this burger cold?  Took too long from the grill to customer Why did it take too long?  Had to wait for fries to be added Why did it wait for the fries?  Fries were not dropped into the fryer Why were the fries not dropped into fryer?  Fry station worker rotated to help cashier
    • 34. Cause and Effect Diagram Perhaps the most useful tool for identifying root causes is the cause and effect diagram. It goes by several names (Ishikawa, fishbone, etc.) and there are a variety of ways to use it. The cause and effect diagram is primarily a tool for organizing information to establish and clarify the relationships between an effect and its main causes. The cause and effect diagram identifies the root cause(s) of the problem so that collective actions can be taken to eliminate their recurrence. The cause and effect diagram develops a picture composed of words and lines designed to show the relationship between the effect and its causes. Receipt process Rushed salespeople EFFECT Hourly completionCAUSES required Analyses were Problem unable to verify Statement Rushed 40% of January Too many sales receipts Not enough sales coverage at peak times Salespeople The cause and effect diagram assists in reaching a common understanding of the problem and exposes the potential drivers of the problem.
    • 35. Fishbone Example: Big Y’s Burgers 5 M’s + E Manpower Machine Material No flame Employee sick Grill Broken Stale Bread Understaffed Too cold Unreadable Ticket Not enough Wrong Wrapping Material Untrained Assigned to work Sauce Dispenser Bad lettuce Fryer Problems Returned Ticketed wrong Order Crowded Space Lunch Rush-too many orders Incorrect Order Excess Toppings Incorrect Placement Order Language Barrier Toppings Delivered to wrong customer Not enough fries Lighting Incorrect wrapping Wrong Too Messy Too much ice Toppings Wrong sizes used Environment Method MeasurementNote: A Fishbone can be quantified using a Cause & Effect Matrix. See a Black Belt for more information.
    • 36. Fishbone Example (Affinity) Computer Internal Mail System System Cost-Reduction Program Older System Excess One Pick-Up Daily Demand Downtime Manual Workspace Equipment Sort New Process Access Limitations Excess Maintenance Lost/Misplaced Mail Demand Contractor Turnover Low Priority Inexperienced Staff Invoices paid Hiring Freeze Turnover Audit Recommendation late for Tighter Control Centralized Access Limitations Payment Manual Crowded Maximize Cash Authorization Files Space Low Priority Morale Payment Branch Offices Paycuts Delays Forward Payments Weekly Missing DocumentationProductivity Deadlines Reorganization Resigned Increased Workload of Purchase Org. No Limit Manager Overtime Missing Reduced Purchase Orders Finance Staff Documentation Policy Note: A Fishbone can be quantified using a Cause & Effect Matrix. See a Black Belt for more information.
    • 37. LEAN(DMADDD) Improving process optimization & speed
    • 38. Digital Six Sigma Flow Chart Change Management Define Measure Analyze Improve ControlD Business Issue Process Solutions Document &M Case Statement Mapping (VSM) Developed StandardizeAI Team Process Solutions Digitize &C Charter Measurement Selected Draw Down Q y ua Stakeholder l ity e nc Measurement fi ci DOE Analysis Systems Analysis Ef TestingLE Risk Cu Assessment Bu stoA yes Pr sin me Analysis ValueN Cause oc es r Root Customer es s s Information Performance no Achieved New Process no or Product no yesDM BHAGAD Customer Needs Customer Needs Paradigm Ideal QFD QFD Verify & Requirements Analysis DesignV & Requirements 1
    • 39. Maximize Efficiency using LeanObjective• Look for major opportunities to improve speed• Evaluate common inputs and outputs for parallel paths• Quantify Value of major activities• Develop and Test ImprovementsKey Tools – Voice of Customer – Value Analysis
    • 40. DSS Methodologies DMAIC  Use for improving quality & service problems;Variation & Defect Reduction reducing variation LeanProcess Efficiency  Use for improving process optimization & speed & Speed DMADV New Product & Use for developing new processes; or radical change Process in process
    • 41. Lean (DMADDD) Phases and Tools Define Business Case, Team Charter, Stakeholder Analysis, VOC, CCRs, CTQs, SIPOC, Process Maps Measure Baseline Performance, Operational Definitions, Measurement Plan, QFD, Check Sheets, Surveys Analyze Brainstorming, Value Analysis: Identify process areas causing poor efficiency Design Develop & Prototype Solutions, Communication Plan Digitize Automate new solutions. Ensure Compliance to Process, Remove ParallelDraw Down Paths & ‘work arounds”
    • 42. Value AnalysisWhy do a Value Analysis?• 80% of most processes are non-value added work!• Design out work that consumes valuable time and energyBusiness 15%Requirements• Work that keeps the Business 30% organization running, Requirement Rework but has no value to Not done right first time the external Poor quality, rejects, customer returns• Financials • Checking Bureaucracy• Hiring • Approvals • Work no one uses 20% Value Added • Redundancy • Reports not used Work • Non-productive meetingsValue-AddedWork BureaucracyIt physically changes Idle Timethe inputs • Waiting/ DelaysThe customer is willing • Backlog 10%to pay for it, orrequires it* Features customer Last Super Bowl, the cares about 25% Football was in motion 17 minutes!
    • 43. Understanding Value Analysis• Introduction to Improvement Criteria – Team can often identify quick and simple opportunities for significant improvement. – Sometimes these quick wins are sufficient for accomplishing the team’s improvement goals.• Customer Value-Added - An activity can be described as adding value for the customer only if: • The customer recognizes the value • It changes the product toward something the customer expects • It is done right the first time• Operational Value-Added - An activity adds operational value if it is not a customer value-added activity and is: • Required to sustain the workplace ability to perform customer value-added activities • Required by contract or other laws and regulation • Required for health, safety, environmental, or personnel development reasons • Done right the first time• Non Value-Added Activities• A team preparing to perform a value analysis of a process will begin by asking some questions relative to each step in the process. Some of these questions may include: – Is this step required by a customer? – Could this step be eliminated?
    • 44. Understanding Value Analysis• Examples: Non-Value-Added Activities – Proofreading – Counting the amount of work – Inspection and checking – Sorting work – Logging information – Checking calculations – Reviewing and approving – Moving and set-up – Monitoring work – Stamping – Any type of rework
    • 45. Value Analysis Job A1) Process Walk Through As A Group:• Review each job tasks and materials• One flip chart page per job2) Separate Value from Non-Value Work• Review each activity & input for value/non value 20% valueValue Add = – Customer will pay for it – Changes inputs Value lineNon-Value= – Redundant 80% non-value – Rework – Unnecessary – Inefficient• Move value added activities above the value line• Move non-value activities below the value line
    • 46. Value Analysis Non-Value Categories Priorities3) Verify 80/20 Rule E.g., WalkingAdd up non-value vs. value activitiesDoes number of non-value activities approximate 80%? #NVA’s:_____4) Categorize Non-Value AreasGroup Common ActivitiesRecord, Look up, Walk, etc...Inputs/Outputs #NVA’s:_____Calculate Time/Category5) Prioritize Non-Value AreasRank Order “biggest” time wasters by # of NVA’s #NVA’s:_____
    • 47. DMADV Design Optimal Process using DMADV
    • 48. Digital Six Sigma Flow Chart Change Management Define Measure Analyze Improve ControlD Business Issue Process Solutions Document &M Case Statement Mapping (VSM) Developed StandardizeAI Team Process Solutions Digitize &C Charter Measurement Selected Draw Down Q y ua Stakeholder l ity e nc Measurement fi ci DOE Analysis Systems Analysis Ef TestingLE Risk Cu Assessment Bu stoA yes Pr sin me Analysis ValueN Cause oc es r Root Customer es s s Information Performance no Achieved New Process no or Product no yesDM BHAGAD Customer Needs Customer Needs Paradigm Ideal QFD QFD Verify & Requirements Analysis DesignV & Requirements 1
    • 49. DMADVObjective: Perfecting the process so that we don’t have todo DMAIC! • Focuses on creating new processes • Or, creating a significantly new level of performance
    • 50. DSS Methodologies DMAIC  Use for improving quality & service problems;Variation & Defect Reduction reducing variation LeanProcess Efficiency  Use for improving process optimization & speed & Speed DMADV New Product &  Use for developing new processes; or radical change Process in process
    • 51. DMADV Phases and ToolsDefine Business Case, Team Charter, Stakeholder Analysis, VOC, CCRs, CTQs, BHAG’sMeasure Measurement Plan, Operational Definitions, QFDAnalyze Paradigm Analysis, SOV Studies, CTQ Flow Down, Initial Models & Ideal DesignsDesign Solution Matrix, Optimized Design, DOE, Pilot Plan Verify Verify Design, Document & Standardize, Prototype, FMEA, Digitization
    • 52. BHAG’s Big, Hairy Audacious GoalsWhy? BHAG’s force you to create world-class processesHow?1. Set a goal that will “significantly” exceed current performance & industry benchmarks2. Ask, “What goal will make us better than the best?”3. The goal should feel impossible! If it doesn’t, you’ll need to cut your stretch goal in half. Obstacles * Perception that significant improvement is impossible * Fear of not making the goal * Risk averse people or culture
    • 53. Paradigm AnalysisA paradigm is a set of assumptions (believed to be true) that maysignificantly limit our view of what’s possible and ultimately, ourperformance. 1. Brainstorm Paradigms 1. What the customer wants Outputs 2. What you have to do Activities 3. Your resources Inputs 1. Identify Givens—things customer/company is unwilling to change  16 data points  Hard copy  Customer isn’t changing  No automation 2. Eliminate "Cant” PERISH PARADIGMS!
    • 54. Ideal Design CaseThe Pendulum SwingsA group of construction specialists, attempting to reduce the cost of a new office building,proposed replacing a 10-story spiral staircase for the atrium with a 10-story brass pendulum.The architect was delighted. The owner was enthusiastic. Half a million dollars was saved!This may give visions of executives sliding down the brass pole, but it really made perfectsense. The function of the staircase was not to serve as a way to get from floor to floor. Thebuilding had elevators to do that. The spiral staircase was merely an architectural feature toconvey an upsweeping dynamic vision to visitors.The group realized that projecting an image was the key to the problem. They brainstormeda variety of different ways to project such an image. In the end, they settled on the brasspendulum, partly because of the money it would save.A group less skilled at problem solving would have proposed ways to build the spiralstaircase more cheaply. This group got to the nub of the matter and focused on thefunction of the staircase.Groups need to manage their problem-solving and communication process to find thependulums, not cheapen the staircase.
    • 55. Ideal DesignIdeal Design is a clean slate approach to process innovation that: • Encourages “visionary” thinking about best system • Legitimizes “letting go” of legacy system Start with vision & design backwards1) Redefine Outputs (Customers true needs) • What needs are we really trying to meet? • Forget about how we currently meet the need • How else could we meet those needs?2) Redesign Value Activities • How else can these activities be done to achieve the result? • Benchmark other companies & industries – How do the “best of best” do it?3) Re-evaluate Inputs • What information is really needed? • In what other form could you use or receive the inputs?4) Experiment • Ideal design is Iterative, so the more tests, the quicker the success! • Retrain
    • 56. Ideal Design Baseline Test Paradigms Ideal DesignsOutput • What are your paradigms about the current output? • Brainstorm alternative output designs to achieve BHAGValue Activity • What is the last activity performed to produce output? • What are your paradigms about this activity? • Are there other ways to do this activity to achieve BHAG?Input • What are your paradigms about the current input? • Are there other ways to use the input to achieve BHAG?
    • 57. IDEAL FINAL RESULT WORKSHEETAttributes 3. Ask WHY ideal (5 times) 2. Ideal n solutio World ct 1. Focus/Goal: eal/Perfe s? et he Id ble to u racteriz e availa igh t cha we hav we m sourcesAttributes s e way n the re2. Ideal th a re all based o What3. Ask WHY ideal (5 times) 66
    • 58. Ideal Final ResultExercise with IFR worksheets1. Define objective/goal/end state2. Describe all ideal attributes of perfect solution3. For each ideal attribute or characteristic in #2, generate multiple reasons/causes WHY this is ideal – ask yourself WHY you wrote that attribute down 5 times…
    • 59. Successful Process Digitization Don’t digitize too soon! Have we done everything to improve this process before automating? Have low cost web applications or re-usable solutions been considered? What tracking systems are needed to ensure process compliance & to prevent “workarounds”? Have all supporting procedures & policies to perform the process been revised or updated? Have supporting procedures & policies for the old process been eliminated? Does training exist in order to teach people the new process? Is there an acceptable ROI for digitizing this process? Can the applications be re-used?
    • 60. DirectedInnovation
    • 61. Where’s The Magic? Status Quo Park in the problem Fire = Invent, Ready, Aim space Manage Creativity like a Get smart people in a room & project brainstorm Identify & evaluate Subjective assessment of importance of solutions to implement, patents problems as well as solutions Vs. to file Process facilitation role with Ad hoc inventors from diverse, cross-functional same project participant pool More difficult problems & radical solutions require more Narrow, incremental participants and diverse “inventions” from individual ideators inventors lead to lower-value patents6
    • 62. What is Directed Innovation?• New Focus – Gnarly Problems, conflicts and tradeoffs generated fromcontrasting today’s solutions with Ideal solution• New Organization – Process Facilitator,SMEs: Critical & Free thinkers,Convergent & Divergent thinkers, Inventor Mentors• New Tools – Provocation, Problem Storming, Question Banking, TRiZ, ValueAnalysis• New Thinking – Creative Problem Solving vs. Brainstorming, Inventing,Patenting• New Technology – Provocation worksheets, Idea Sheets, Post-it Notes,Chocolate, Mint & Cinnamon*• New Applications – Patent drafting/Claims writing, Research Project Definition,Marketing, Product Naming* Stimulate the right side of brain
    • 63. What can we expect from DI?PerformanceImprovement The Process Half–Life Effect t Lean/DFSS/100% ovemen inuo us Impr DMADV/DI Discont DMAIC/DI50% nt me r ove s i mp ti nuou Con20% Low Hanging Fruit Traditional Management 0% (Status Quo) Crisis Crisis-10% 3 6 9 12 months Ray Stata, Sloan Management Review, 1989.
    • 64. History• Advanced Inventing – Ad hoc brainstorming by project teams – Infrequent Patent attorney participation – Direct to patent filings
    • 65. History• Strategic Portfolio Development – Focused on generating solutions & patents from new promising technology – TRiZ used rarely to identify conflicts & tradeoffs in new technology – Attorney = scribe – SME = facilitator (sometimes) – Project &/or technology team participation – Participants vote on ideas to patent
    • 66. History• Directed Innovation – Agnostic facilitator – Provocation/Question Banking – Diverse & cross-functional team – Innovators = scribes-> Idea Sheets – Problem Storming –> Post-its – Chocolate, Cinnamon, Peppermint – Competition – Concept Evaluation by SMEs & Patent Attorney – Prior Art searching/ Patcomm review – Inventor Mentors – Balanced left brain vs. right brain activities
    • 67. The “Define” Phase Is Critical 90% of innovation initiatives fail due to:Project Selection Lack of alignment between business & IP Strategy Long time to obtain (3-4 yrs) & leverage (8 yrs.) IP No budget allocation to future problems (AnTRIZipation) Team Charter No concise & shared problem statements Not staffed with the right people or enough planning Stakeholder Key stakeholders risk averse Analysis Key stakeholders invent themselves Risk Assessment Starting projects with no understanding of IP Landscape Ignoring early red flags – litigiousness of competitors Customer Lack understanding of variety of customers’ perspectives Requirements & issues/problems – FUNCTIONAL perspective lacking
    • 68. Treat Your Inventing session like a PROJECT and MANAGE it! 1.0 PLAN 4.0 2.0 ACT DO 3.0 CHECK
    • 69. Directed Innovation Methods Overview  Use for understanding all the problems to be solved in Provocation / Problem Storming order to implement the Ideal Solution  Use for engaging diverse population in creative Question problem solving to generate more and better solutions Banking Use for effectively capturing all solutions potentially Ideation applicable in this problem domain or closely-related ones Concept  Use for determining most feasible, revenue-producing Evaluation solutions  Use problem statements to generate specification and Disclosure / Claims Drafting all solutions to generate independent and dependent claims of patent application
    • 70. PLAN• Select Inventing team  Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) in Technology Domain  Identify/select team members • critical thinkers (problem-oriented) • divergent thinkers (creatives)  Facilitator (see IAF Handbook of Group Facilitation) • process observer • objectivity • no emotional connectivity to outcome
    • 71. PLANProblem Storming (w/ critical thinkers) – Describe and list all attributes of Ideal Solution(s) • see TRiZ – Identify known solutions X and current patents Y • Describe characteristics and parameters of X and Y and why they are insufficient: CRITICAL CHALLENGES • 39 Parameters Matrix (http://triz40.com/) & 40 Inventive Principles – Once have Critical Challenges, transform these problem statements to thought-provoking questions to inspire radical thinking • Generate an open-ended question in the form of "How might we achieve the IDEAL attribute by applying X or Y technology or solution without introducing a limiting characteristic (parameter) of X or Y technologies or solutions?” *The format of the problem statements and related open-ended thought-provoking questions is key to successful results
    • 72. Issue Statement – DI Prework• Reframe original problem statement as several different open-ended, thought-provoking, generic questions that can engage diverse set of creative problem solvers & generate portfolio of alternative solutions• Break Ideation into several 1- 1.5 hour sessions focusing on one problem/question within the domain for 15-30 minutes each• Keeps team focused! – Fast-paced – Rotate partners – Idea Sheet generation competitive
    • 73. • Technical Conflict/Problem Area: • ASSUMPTION STORMING! List & # perceived limitations, boundaries, constraints. • Provocations – what would be possible if each of our constraints were removed? Address each limitation individually in #2; try to gen 2-3 per item in #2.• Which of those conceptual directions in #3 is the Boldest Provocation? • “Problem Storm” on #3…AND ideate potential thought-provoking Questions for the DI session (Steps #2-4+)
    • 74. 3. Opportunities w/o limitation2. limitations 1. Focus/Goal/Objective/Problem: 2. limitations3. Opportunities w/o limitation QuestionGeneration-Recipe: How might we use Opportunity #3 to overcome Limitation #2 and achieve/remove #1? OR How might we achieve/remove #1 by using #3 without #2?
    • 75. “Millions saw the applefall, but Newton was the one who asked WHY.” Bernard Baruch
    • 76. How Questions Help Creative Problem Solving• Clarifies problems• Engages minds• Increases brain flow• Cultivates curiosity• Improves Listening• Promotes analogous thinking• Enhances quality thinking• Accelerates innovation• Improves idea management
    • 77. Questions Accelerate the M-Curve andHelp Produce Breakthrough Ideas Faster ????????????????? STIMULANTS ??????????????? New Solutions Old IdeasVALUE TIME
    • 78. What is the Question Banking Methodology?  IDENTIFY Sources of Questions  COLLECT Questions  ORGANIZE Questions  IMPROVE Questions  APPLY Questions (Questionate to Ideate)
    • 79. Questions to Ask When Collecting Questions What are ALL the questions that people might answer in order to address the goal(s), challenge(s) or problem(s)? What are all the obstacles or challenges that might relate to the goal(s)? What are the 3-5 MOST IMPORTANT questions that should be asked to address the goal(s)?
    • 80. Question Banking TIPS & Checklist Archive Word outline or Excel database Distribute to diverse community for feedback Review & reuse problem statements Search the internet for existing solutions and reframe as questions Review other Question Banks Wordsmith and polish questions – Use www.thesaurus.com – Increase “open-ended” questions – Eliminate “closed” questions that can be answered “yes” or “no” – Replace “can” and “could/should” with “might” and “may” – Genericise so non-domain experts can engage and invent from different domains – Tease out conflicts, contradictions and tradeoffs√ Quality Review CHECKLIST Brief and concise Provocative, inviting and inspiring Clear and focused Understandable by variety of people Grammatically correct Functional, action-oriented verbs that describe the desired result or outcome
    • 81. “Don’t Ever Stop Asking Questions” - Albert Einstein
    • 82. Team ProblemStorming = TeamQuestionBankingExercise
    • 83. ExerciseAt this point Maria will walk participants through an exercise in converting the Original Issue Statement they created into several Thought-provoking Open-ended Creative problem solvingQuestions• Focused on The Conflict Zone (tradeoffs)
    • 84. TeamIdeation = TeamProblemSolving
    • 85. Many Techniques to Think Creatively
    • 86. TRIZ Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatel’skikh ZadachThe Theory of Inventive Problem Solving Dan Heck 847.570.0449 847.420.1744 c 847.400.0880 fax http://www.bluefuseinc.com
    • 87. "The mere formulation of a problem is farmore often essential than its solution, whichmay be merely a matter of mathematical orexperimental skill. To raise new questions,new possibilities, to regard old problems froma new angle requires creative imaginationand marks real advances in science." Albert Einstein
    • 88. TRIZ-An amazing set of tools• Theory of Inventive Problem Solving• Techniques for creative problem solving validated by over 50 years of research and 19 years of real world application t gi sn’ n lvi1946-1985; 1985- So• Invented by Genrich Altshuller in today worldwide lem !!! ro b i n g e P orm ativ inst• Premise: Cre bra just
    • 89. Some Aspects of TRIZ Objects and Functions Psychological InertiaLines of engineering system evolution Ideal Model
    • 90. Problems can be constructed as Substances and Fields of InteractionsKey Insight #1: Strip descriptions of domain language S1 S2 Psychological inertia
    • 91. Action Words to Reframe Interactions or FunctionsVerbs that are best to use (in place of domain-specific verbs):1. Obtain : evolve, extract, obtain, produce, synthesize2. eliminate: absorb, break down, decompose, remove, treat3. Move: agitate, orient, rotate, stir, transmit4. Retain: apply, deposit, embed, hold, join, retain5. Protect: preserve, protect6. Separate: comminute, crush, extract, separate, spray7. Change substance’s Properties: change, produce8. Measure properties: change, define, detect, determine, measure, visualize9. Generate: create, evolve, generate, initiate, produce10. Absorb11. Redistribute energy: concentrate, disperse, orient, reflect, transmit12. Accumulate (energy)13. Change field’s properties14. Measure field’s characteristics: detect, measure, visualize TFM Problem Analysis Step 3
    • 92. Our mind tends to automatically organize newinformation with our current knowledge.
    • 93. “Even though one was correct at each stage, the situation may still have to be restructured to proceed.” Edward de Bono [http://www.edwdebono.com/]Key Insight #2:Be willing to rearrange what you know(overcome psychological inertia!) contradictions
    • 94. Technical ContradictionHow to improveboth A and B? SYSTEM Parameter A↑ Parameter B ↓• A situation when an improvement of one characteristic (parameter) leads to the deterioration of another characteristic (parameter). Used with permission: Invention Machine Corporation
    • 95. How do engineering techniques handle contradictions?
    • 96. What did Altshuller observe? Inventors Don’t Optimize First…
    • 97. Inventors start with a different question! How can I build a SMALL cellphone that’s lightweight, AND with BIG buttons my elderly parents can see and select without misdialing?
    • 98. ELIMINATE COMPROMISE!Clever inventions achieve the desired function without harming or deteriorating other parameters of the product, software, or service. single lens reflex camera Burn bright without burning up! View exactly what the film will see without obstructing the light Guttenberg printing press, oil-based ink - Heavier than air AND print a page as clear as weigh nothing. a custom woodblock print
    • 99. 400,000 Inventions Studied by Altshuller – The Most Clever Solved ContradictionsKey Insight #3:If you find yourself trading off features, reframeyour desire into, “I want BOTH [feature 1] AND[feature 2].” Then stay in this creative space!
    • 100. You Think…• Identify a fix you want to make or an area under your control you want to improve.• Write it down: “I want to __________.”• Now, what is one of the obstacles to doing that?• Write that down: “If I do what I want, then _______ becomes a problem.• Rewrite the contradiction with an inventor’s mindset: “How might I have BOTH ______ AND _______?” or “How might I have ______ without ____________?”• Now, don’t dismiss it…• Park on it…• Ponder it…• Find a solution that “resolves the contradiction.”
    • 101. “Do inventors use any common approaches to solve contradictions?”Altshuller was a very curious fellow…
    • 102. Across 400,000 patents, 8. Anti-Weight9.9. Preliminary Preliminary Altshuller 9. Preliminary 7. ‘Nested Doll’ identified 40 approaches 9. Preliminary 9. Preliminary repeatedly used by inventors 9. Preliminary 6. Universality 9. Preliminary called the 9. Preliminary 5. Merging 9. Preliminary 40 Inventive Principles. 9. Preliminary 9. Preliminary 4. Asymmetry 9. Preliminary 9. Preliminary 9. Preliminary 3. Local Quality 9. Preliminary 9. Preliminary 2. Taking Out 9. Preliminary 39. Preliminary 1. Segmentation 40. Composite Materials
    • 103. Handouts - sources of questions•• Pack of Principles (Triz card deck) -Handouts TRIZ-Q Bank 40 Inventive Principles 99 Questions - Handout 99 Questions based on 40 TRIZ Principles - v1 1. Segmentation (Principle #1) 1. How might it be segmented? 2. How might it be segmented into independent parts? 3. How might it be easy to disassemble? 4. How might we increase the degree of fragmentation or segmentation? 2. Separation (Principle #2) 5. How might the interfering parts or properties be singled out? 6. How might only the necessary part be single out? 3. Local Quality (Principle #3) 7. How might the structure be changed from uniform to non-uniform? 8. How might the external environment or influence be changed from uniform to non uniform? 9. How might each part function in conditions most suitable for its operation? 10. How might each part fulfill different and useful functions? 4. Symmetry Change (Principle #4) 11. How might the shape be changed from symmetrical to asymmetrical? 12. If it is asymmetrical, how might the degree of asymmetry be increased? 5. Merging (Principle #5) 13. How might identical or similar objects be brought closer together or merged? 14. How might identical or similar parts be assembled to perform parallel operations? 15. How might operations be contiguous or parallel? 16. How might operations be brought together in time? 6. Multifunctionality (Principle #6) 17. How might parts or objects perform multiple functions? 18. How might parts or objects eliminate the need for other parts? 7. Nested Doll (Principle #7) 19. How might one object be placed inside another? 20. How might one object be placed inside another, and then inside another? 21. How might one part pass through a cavity into another? 8. Weight Compensation (Principle #8) 22. How might the weight of an object be compensated by merging with other objects to provide lift? 23. How might the weight of an object be compensated by interacting with the environment? 24. How might the weight of an object be compensated by interacting with the aerodynamic forces? 25. How might the weight of an object be compensated by interacting with the hydrodynamic forces?
    • 104. SummarizeRecognize theContradiction
    • 105. SummarizeRecognize the 40Contradiction Inventive Principles
    • 106. Summarize Recognize the 40 Contradiction Inventive PrinciplesSelect a few Likely Approaches
    • 107. Summarize Recognize the Contradiction 40 Inventive 1. 2. # # Principles 3. # 4. # 1. # 2. # 3. # 4. #Select a few Likely Brainstorm Ideas Approaches 1. # 1. # Around Each One 2. # 3. # 2. # 3. # 4. # Question
    • 108. Do different engineering disciplines use the same Inventive Principles to solve analogous contradictions? Simplified TRiZ: New Problem-Solving Applications for Engineers & Manufacturing Professionals by Kalevi Rantanen, Ellen Domb www.triz-journal.com Lines of Evolution
    • 109. S-curve of Evolution Function Value = -------------- CostI, mainparameter 3 2 1 T, Eng Sys Life Span
    • 110. Key Insight #4:Technology matures along repeated curves.Look for solutions already implemented in any areayou think might have trade-offs similar to yours.
    • 111. Ideality-in the physical world…applies to software no memory? An Ideal System occupies no space, has no weight, requires no service orfunctions maintenance, but still performs the require Main Function no cycle with all the benefits and no harmful interactions. time? What is the ideal software program? What is ideal data?
    • 112. Key Insight #5:Clearly define the IDEAL outcome … if anything were possible, what are all theparameters & characteristics that describe the idealsolution?
    • 113. Think CreaTRIZively ! TM#1 Strip descriptions of domain language#2 Be willing to rearrange what you know#3 Describe contradictions and park on them!#4 Is this problem or trade-off solved in other disciplines?#5 What would this ideally look like?
    • 114. “Don’t worry about other people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats.” – Howard Aiken, IBM Engineer
    • 115. 2.0 DO = CREATE DO• Schedule venue & gather materials  Laptop w/ projection system  Round table(s)  Easel boards w/ large Post-it3M sheets to hang on walls  Small lined Post-its3M – CAPTURE PROBLEMS TOO!  Provocation Templates, Idea Booklets, Idea Exchange Template  Pens & Pencils & Colored Markers  Toys & puzzles & Silly PuttyTM or Play-DohTM  Chocolate & cinnamon & popcorn – Chocolate may boost brain power: http://health.yahoo.com/news/162487 – Painting with Chocolate: http://painting.about.com/cs/inspiration/a/chocolatepaint.htm
    • 116. CHECK:Evaluate
    • 117. Directed Innovation: 3.0 CHECK Phase (evaluate) 3.1 Ideation Post-Process Evaluation• For each concept or idea generated, assign a VALUE score Which Problem was it intended to solve? How well does the concept “solve” the original Problem? Is the solution novel vs. patent & internet search? Engage additional Subject Matter Experts to assess, evaluate, broaden initial high-value concepts – Inventor Mentors!• Identify unsolved problems for further ideation
    • 118. Directed Innovation: 3.0 CHECK Phase (evaluate)• 3.2 Patent Committee evaluation of disclosure portfolio• 3.3 Analyze ideation results and pursual rate of disclosures generated• 3.4 Stay abreast of industry/domain trends• 3.5 Keep current with Business-IP Strategy alignment and changes• 3.6 Review Acquisitions’ impact on strength of IP portfolio
    • 119. 4.0 ACT• 4.1 Stay vigilant and track trends: – Google industry-specific news = business or technology press releases http://www.googlescholar.com – Monitor relevant blogs, RSS feeds, email alerts, twitter – Review internal and external competitive intelligence and trends reports – Analyze portfolio pipeline (disclosures, filings, issuances): Innovation, Delphion, Derwent (Thomson Reuters) – Read patents USPTO, EPO, JPO, wipo.org = patent trend analysis http://www.google.com/patents or www.freepatentsonline.com
    • 120. Directed Innovation: 4.0 ACT Phase4.2 Redirect non-patentable ideas to other suggestion systems or to business strategy teams4.3 Provide inputs to business strategy on attractive IP Acquisitions4.4 Determine other (cross-functional) teams to engage in follow-up ideation sessions4.5 Identify new/emerging problems (trends) for solution invention OR assignees w/ existing solutions to partner with4.6/1.0 “Plan” for follow-up inventing sessions (continuous process improvement)
    • 121. Post mortem – DI lessons learned1. Two Day agenda - infuse with networking and fun!2. INVENTOR MENTORS3. Follow-through! Post the problem statements; share and reuse QUESTION BANKS Engage employees as creative problem solvers worldwide Involve more critical thinkers sooner in the Planning/problem storming PLAN new sessions on low yield problem areas4. Continue to evolve and publicize Question Banks to feed ideation pipeline
    • 122. Recommended Books for Skills Building Innovate Like Edison: The Success System of America’s Greatest Inventor by Michael Gelb, Sarah Miller Caldicott Think Better: An Innovators Guide to Productive Thinking by Tim Hurson Conceptual Blockbusting: A Guide to Better Ideas Simplified TRiZ: New Problem-Solving by James L. Adams Applications for Engineers & Manufacturing Professionals by Kalevi Rantanen, Ellen Domb Making Questions Work: A Guide to What and How to Ask for Facilitators, Consultants, Managers, Coaches, and Educators by Dorothy Strachan Motorola Solutions Inc Intellectual Asset Management 141
    • 123. Good News!"The truly great advances of this generation will be made by those who can make outrageous connections, and only a mind which knows how to play can do that." - Nagle Jackson, PlaywrightScience of Playhttp://abcnews.go.com/Video/playerIndex?id=7001867National Institute for Playhttp://www.nifplay.org/Play: Introductory Videohttp://www.nifplay.org/index2.html
    • 124. Summary – What have we learned?Six Sigma and DI share a common ancestrySix Sigma began as an approach to reduce defects (DMAIC)It has evolved to include Efficiency and Effectiveness (Lean) New Processes and Products (DMADV and SSPD) Human Aspect (Change Management)DI began as an Ad hoc set of tools and methodsIt has evolved into a facilitated, structured, team approach for creating and capturing IP value.Motorola Public, Process Excellence Week, Rev 1.2MOTOROLA and the Stylized M Logo are registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners. © Motorola, Inc. 2009
    • 125. Summary – What’s Next?Integrate DSS and DIDefine – Measure – Analyze Use Provocation/Problem Storming, Question Banking and Ideation to Improve the Quality of the Problem DescriptionImprove Use Provocation/Problem Storming, Question Banking, Ideation and Concept Evaluation to Generate Higher Value Potential SolutionsControl Use Disclosure/Claims Drafting to Capture & PROTECT Solution valueMotorola Public, Process Excellence Week, Rev 1.2MOTOROLA and the Stylized M Logo are registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners. © Motorola, Inc. 2009
    • 126. Stakeholders VOC VOB VOP Improved Problem Definition P ? D M D ACha nge Prioritization I Man Quick Projects Wins agem Decide E ent oP r M ce t j C S ga na A Phase Gate Process e ne m 3
    • 127. DSS Flow Chart – Directed Innovation overlay Change Management Define Measure Analyze Improve ControlD IP Business Landscape Provocation/ TRiZ/ Function Issue Process Solutions Document & Analysis IdeationM Case Probl. Storming Statement Analysis Mapping Developed StandardizeAI Provocation Team Process Concept Solutions Digitize & Focus & SMEs Charter Evaluation Selected Draw DownC Measurement Q ua y Budget Stakeholder l ity e nc Measurement fi ci DOE Sponsor Analysis Systems Analysis Ef TestingLE Risk Cu Assessment Bu stoA yes Pr sin me Analysis ValueN Cause oc es r Root SME Customer es s s Interviews Information Performance no Achieved New Process no or Product no yesD ConflictM BHAG Zone TRiZ- TRiZ – ConceptA Tradeoffs Ideality EvaluationD Customer Needs Paradigm Ideal Ideal Customer Needs QFD Verify & Requirements QFD Analysis Design DesignV & Requirements Question PatComm Provocation Banking Review 5
    • 128. Handouts – Idea SheetsPrioritize top ideation questions generatedPartner up/ 2-3 per teamUse idea sheets to generate creative solutions to eachquestion we have generatedMotorola Public, Process Excellence Week, Rev 1.2MOTOROLA and the Stylized M Logo are registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners. © Motorola, Inc. 2009
    • 129. Session Name: Gemini Innovation Workshop Idea Sheet Motorola Confidential when CompletedWhat problem are you trying to solve? What is a “working title” or keywords for your innovation?(If working from a list of questions, record the question number.) How might your idea/solution be implemented? (A sketch, flowchart, or list of features will help to explain this.)What is your idea/solution? Idea Recorder HandoutsInnovator(s) CoreID(s): Week, Rev 1.2 Motorola Public, Process Excellence Suggested Lead: Potential Business Value: Today’s Date: MOTOROLA and the Stylized M Logo are registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office. All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners. © Motorola, Inc. 2009 High, Medium, Low, Unknown 4/27/2007
    • 130. Innovation Instigator NetworksFACEBOOK: friend me @ “Innovation Maven” LINKEDIN: Connect with me @ www.linkedin.com/in/mariabthompson
    • 131. Maria B. ThompsonMotorola Solutions, Inc. Director of Innovation Strategy & CTO Innovation ChampionSummary•Coordinate, plan, and facilitate Directed Innovation creative problem solving sessions, andmentor innovators on conversion of concepts/ideas to patent disclosures, resulting in high-quality, novel, and patentable solutions to targeted critical challenges.•Benchmark, tailor, adapt and manage the transition and institutionalization of process andtechnology best practices to enhance organizational capability.Significant Achievements:• Facilitated > 100 Directed Innovation ideation workshops, resulting in 1000s of patentapplications and novel solutions to product, process, service, & market problems.• Digitized entire IPR Management lifecycle from idea conception through to patent expiration.• Prototyped, trialed, tested and deployed seminal methods and technologies for organizationalquality, cycle time and productivity improvement.Specialties• Creative Problem Solving, Invention and Innovation Facilitation• TRIZ (Theory of Inventive Problem Solving)• Change Catalyst• Systems Dynamics• Scenario Planning• Information Technology Management• Organizational Process design, Re-engineering and Improvement ( e.g., SEI CMM)• IPR Management: Prior Art Searching, Patent legal processes and tools, Patent Analytics• Human-Computer Interaction and Communication devices• Coaching and Speaking
    • 132. Jeff Summers (co-author) is a results oriented executive with 28 years of diverse experienceacross multiple functions and industries. Certified Master Black Belt with experience inContinuous Improvement, Lean and Designing for Six Sigma approaches. A certified instructorfor numerous Six Sigma, Change Management and Quality Leadership courses. He hasextensive experience with Plant start-ups and major process re-design projects. He has highlydeveloped interpersonal, coaching, mentoring and presentation skills.Jeff is currently the Director of Quality and Digital Six Sigma Learning for Motorola University.In this capacity he is responsible for both the Internal program for Motorolans and the Externalprogram for our Customers, Suppliers, and the public. http://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffreycsummersFor more information about Six Sigma and Innovation courses offered throughMotorola University, please visit our website at :http://www.motorola.com/Business/US-EN/Training+Home/North+America+Training/North+America+Certifications/Lean+Six+Sigma+Certifications

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