Chinese one child policy - School assignment - St Stithians Girls' College

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Reviewing the policy and its impact on the role of girls in China

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Chinese one child policy - School assignment - St Stithians Girls' College

  1. 1. The most basic of allhuman rights is theright to live.GENDERCIDE IN CHINAThe Hidden Holocaust
  2. 2. Why now?: Because there are 40 to 60 millionChinese bachelors unable to find a bride.Until recently foreigners could adopt“unwanted”, abandoned Chinese girls but theChinese government is now preventing theseadoptions as it casts the government in a badlight1,7 million girls go missing each year!
  3. 3. Population Crisis in China•Almost a quarter of the world’s populationlives on just over 5% of the arable land.This resulted in a huge crisis – China hadto find a solution to this problem•In 1979, the Chinese government initiateda policy that permitted only one child percouple.•In some rural areas, families are allowedto have two children, if the first child isfemale, or disabled.
  4. 4. results of One-child policy:A drop of 300 million births in China – i.e Equal toUSA entire population•Improved standard of living for smaller families•China was finally able to feed its people at least “onebowl of rice a day.”resultsSecond generation of single children ‐‐with noaunts, uncles, siblings or cousinsA set of parents and two sets of grandparents cater toone child (“Little Emperor”)Later, all 6 adults rely upon this one child to work theland and support them
  5. 5. How do you guarantee that your onlychild is a boy?Gender‐selection abortions•Government widely distributes Sonograms to helpofficials ensure that women are NOT pregnant orthat they are using birth control devices, these arethen used for sex‐selection abortions•These abortions are NOT illegal (The law banningit has been withdrawn)Ascertaining the sex of a fetus can only be done at18 weeks of pregnancy or later – (4 ½ months)•There are frequent reports in Chinese media ofsex‐selection abortions at 7th, 8th or 9th month ofpregnancy
  6. 6. Fatally neglect your daughtes so they dieprematurelyDeliberately under feed girls and or fail to providethem with the necessary medical care so thatwhen they die you can have a son.Kill your daughters outightThere is a history of infanticide – It is estimated thathundreds of thousands of girl infants are killed everyyear – often by other members of the family. They aredrowned, suffocated or starved to death!Doctors kill 3rd born girls or girls born without thegovernment’s consent – they often smother them todeath at birth! They do this to avoid being punishedthemselves for failing to honour family planning policies..
  7. 7. Abandon your daughters – but do so with care!•Do this when your daughter is born or• When you finally give birth to the son you reallywant or if your daughter is your 3rd or later birthorder child or•If you get remarried and want children with yournew partner orTraffic your daughter to the highest bidder• sell her to child traffickers for as little as $8 / orto become the future bride of a wealthy familywith a son!* Strangely enough abandonment of an infant ispunishable by law but killing an infant is not.
  8. 8. What is the rest of the world doing about thisgendercide in China?It was not even covered in Human Rights Watchʹsreport in January 2007•Acknowledged in five words in the 2005 U.S. StateDepartment report•Only got a passing nod in the World HealthOrganization report•Not mentioned in any Amnesty International reports•Not touched in Human Rights in China organization’sprojects• It is not covered in the Convention of theElimination of all Forms of Discrimination AgainstWomen (CEDAW). WHY NOT? This is a disgrace!
  9. 9. •Additional research sources (inc. for China Population to 2050):National Population & Family Planning Commission of China in 2003•http://www.china.com.cn/people/txt/2004‐05/21/content_5569757.htm•http://www.stats.gov.cn/tjgb/•http://www.gjjsw.gov.cn/rkzh/rk/tjzlzg/t20070302_172620953.html•http://www.cpirc.org.cn/tjsj/tjsj_cy_detail.asp?id=6740•http://www.cpirc.org.cn/tjsj/tjsj_cy_detail.asp?id=304•http://www.cpirc.org.cn/tjsj/tjsj_cy_detail.asp?id=2630•http://www.cpirc.org.cn/tjsj/tjsj_cy_detail.asp?id=4275•http://www.cpirc.org.cn/tjsj/tjsj_cy_detail.asp?id=6628•http://www.cpirc.org.cn/tjsj/tjsj_cd_detail.asp?id=4235•http://www.gjjsw.gov.cn/rkzh/rk/tjzlzg/t20070111_200559299• http://www.taliacarner.com• http://www.Brian Woods’“The Dying Rooms”Research‐China.org

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