How to Get More from Your Content

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How to turn one editorial asset into new forms for use on different channels with less stress and better results. This was originally presented as a webinar in March 2011 for the Insurance & Financial Communicators Association.

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  • Thanks for having me today. I'm excited to talk to you about how to work smarter, not harder, to get more from your content. \n
  • We all know that content is king. And there are definitely times when it feels like we’re the court jesters. But with a little strategy, we can change all that. We can be the power behind the throne!\n
  • In fact, according to a November 2010 PRNewswire survey, of the top three content challenges facing businesses today number one is finding the time to manage content. Calgon, take me away! Almost two-thirds of the respondents have trouble finding the time to manage content, and just over half have trouble figuring out what channels to use for the content they do create. I think a lot of that is because the current approach most of us use is inefficient. \n\nSituations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients. \n\n\n\n
  • In fact, according to a November 2010 PRNewswire survey, of the top three content challenges facing businesses today number one is finding the time to manage content. Calgon, take me away! Almost two-thirds of the respondents have trouble finding the time to manage content, and just over half have trouble figuring out what channels to use for the content they do create. I think a lot of that is because the current approach most of us use is inefficient. \n\nSituations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients. \n\n\n\n
  • In fact, according to a November 2010 PRNewswire survey, of the top three content challenges facing businesses today number one is finding the time to manage content. Calgon, take me away! Almost two-thirds of the respondents have trouble finding the time to manage content, and just over half have trouble figuring out what channels to use for the content they do create. I think a lot of that is because the current approach most of us use is inefficient. \n\nSituations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients. \n\n\n\n
  • In fact, according to a November 2010 PRNewswire survey, of the top three content challenges facing businesses today number one is finding the time to manage content. Calgon, take me away! Almost two-thirds of the respondents have trouble finding the time to manage content, and just over half have trouble figuring out what channels to use for the content they do create. I think a lot of that is because the current approach most of us use is inefficient. \n\nSituations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients. \n\n\n\n
  • In fact, according to a November 2010 PRNewswire survey, of the top three content challenges facing businesses today number one is finding the time to manage content. Calgon, take me away! Almost two-thirds of the respondents have trouble finding the time to manage content, and just over half have trouble figuring out what channels to use for the content they do create. I think a lot of that is because the current approach most of us use is inefficient. \n\nSituations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients. \n\n\n\n
  • In fact, according to a November 2010 PRNewswire survey, of the top three content challenges facing businesses today number one is finding the time to manage content. Calgon, take me away! Almost two-thirds of the respondents have trouble finding the time to manage content, and just over half have trouble figuring out what channels to use for the content they do create. I think a lot of that is because the current approach most of us use is inefficient. \n\nSituations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients. \n\n\n\n
  • In fact, according to a November 2010 PRNewswire survey, of the top three content challenges facing businesses today number one is finding the time to manage content. Calgon, take me away! Almost two-thirds of the respondents have trouble finding the time to manage content, and just over half have trouble figuring out what channels to use for the content they do create. I think a lot of that is because the current approach most of us use is inefficient. \n\nSituations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients. \n\n\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • Does this sound familiar? Last year, a client hired me to create a one-off news release announcing a new product. No problem! Then they wanted a blurb based on the same information for the product section of a trade magazine. Then they needed a video and slide deck for a trade show. Then, finally, an advertorial. I was initially frustrated because I had to keep going back to subject-matter experts for key data points and constantly refresh my memory about my client’s goals so I could stay on message in every piece I created. And, as so often happens, I had to go through a new review process with each document. Calgon, take me away!\n\n
  • It would have been so much easier to have researched what we needed for all these pieces at once. Faster, too. And we could have avoided extra review cycles, message dilution and other shenanigans that bogged us all down and cost everyone time and money. \n
  • Situations like this are what prompted me to get more strategic about the work The Word Factory team does for our clients. Instead of focusing on the task, we set our sites on the purpose behind the task. That opened up new possibilities for spreading key messages, driving results and adding value to our clients.\n
  • We now look at each project as a content supply chain. A content supply what? Instead of looking at a piece of content as a one-off, we broaden our perspective to look at it as part of a larger ecosystem. Here’s what I mean:\n
  • Think of the source waters of a river. That font is all the raw materials you need to create content: The data, goals and already-created materials that exist in the wild. As it flows downstream, it widens, gathering up more input like messaging strategies, user data, marketing tactics, departmental goals – and the people involved in making and managing all that. I’ve even seen a few egos in there.\n
  • Then there are the content creators and managers who work with the upstream data and sources to create content that meets their operational and other goals while also meeting the needs of their audience. We also come up with tons of ideas of where to send the content downstream. \n
  • Finally, content creators, managers and stakeholders work together to filter through all those options to determine the right channels for the right content to reach the right people.\n
  • Here’s an up close and personal view of the content supply chain idea I’ve been talking about.\n\nWhat trips most of us up – wastes our time, drives us nuts – is the content creation and distribution, so that’s what we’re going to focus on today.\n
  • \n
  • Here’s an off-the-top-of-my-head look at some of the genres, channels and forms of content that could be created off a master document like a news release or overview.\n
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  • This approach helps me work smarter, not harder, because it allows me to repurpose content across many forms. That translates into \n•More effective communications \n•Less message dilution and project creep\n•Better use of my time\n Increased productivity and cost efficiency\n
  • This approach helps me work smarter, not harder, because it allows me to repurpose content across many forms. That translates into \n•More effective communications \n•Less message dilution and project creep\n•Better use of my time\n Increased productivity and cost efficiency\n
  • This approach helps me work smarter, not harder, because it allows me to repurpose content across many forms. That translates into \n•More effective communications \n•Less message dilution and project creep\n•Better use of my time\n Increased productivity and cost efficiency\n
  • This approach helps me work smarter, not harder, because it allows me to repurpose content across many forms. That translates into \n•More effective communications \n•Less message dilution and project creep\n•Better use of my time\n Increased productivity and cost efficiency\n
  • This approach helps me work smarter, not harder, because it allows me to repurpose content across many forms. That translates into \n•More effective communications \n•Less message dilution and project creep\n•Better use of my time\n Increased productivity and cost efficiency\n
  • And that makes me more valuable to my department, boss and clients!\n
  • This strategic process helps us create content that meets business goals. It works like this:\n
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  • Here’s an example of the process in action. I was recently asked to write a one-pager announcing a webinar for emergency medical professionals. Easy enough. But when we reviewed the client’s goals for the piece, it became clear there were other forms of communication we could create from the source document that would allow them to meet their goals, get the message to the right people more effectively and allow us to create all the materials at one time.\n
  • Now, this might feel like “up-selling”, and in a way it is because we’re trying to get a client to do more than they wanted. But it’s a positive and constructive up-sell because I’m helping them reach their goals more effectively – and it’s not going to require as much as my client thinks it will in terms of time and resources.\n
  • When I take a this new approach, the additional forms I create amplify the effect of the original in ways that are consistent with my client’s goals. \n\nI’m also selling them cost efficiencies. And last time I checked, time is still money.\n
  • Under the old model, clients pay to create each piece from scratch. Each billed at an hourly rate. That meter is running, y’all!\n\nWith the new model, though, I’m paid to create everything at once. The efficiencies of that process mean that while the project will take a little longer than a one-off piece might, it’s going to take – and as a result cost – a whole lot less than if you paid me per piece. This really makes sense for those of you who outsource content creation.\n
  • Under the old model, clients pay to create each piece from scratch. Each billed at an hourly rate. That meter is running, y’all!\n\nWith the new model, though, I’m paid to create everything at once. The efficiencies of that process mean that while the project will take a little longer than a one-off piece might, it’s going to take – and as a result cost – a whole lot less than if you paid me per piece. This really makes sense for those of you who outsource content creation.\n
  • But the approach has value even in a corporate setting, where no money changes hands. How? Well, doing as much as possible up front cuts the over all time you spend on any given project, freeing you up to serve more clients and solve other problems. That’s good for your internal business, sure. But it also makes you happier employee. \n
  • But the approach has value even in a corporate setting, where no money changes hands. How? Well, doing as much as possible up front cuts the over all time you spend on any given project, freeing you up to serve more clients and solve other problems. That’s good for your internal business, sure. But it also makes you happier employee. \n
  • Back to my example. A short invitation would be send via email to an list the client had purchased, but they wanted more promotion through national and state healthcare associations and trade groups. A one-pager would go to the PR people at these organizations in hopes they’d use it to spread the word.\n
  • Not a bad idea, but what if we went ahead and created a lot of different forms? \n
  • Here’s how we do it.\n
  • Here’s how we do it.\n
  • Here’s how we do it.\n
  • Here’s how we do it.\n
  • Here’s how we do it.\n
  • Here’s how it looks for the flow-chart lovers in the audience. Now before you freak out, let me break it down for you. There are six simple steps. Let’s walk through it!\n\n
  • We start by determining the audience and purpose for the master content. Clients are usually pretty clear on the purpose and audience, so it makes a lot of sense to start with them. But the more detail, the better. So we walk them, stakeholders and even our team through a couple of strategies to make sure we map this out as clearly as possible.\n
  • We start with the Content-Purpose-Audience, which a lot of y’all are familiar with if you’ve been to any of our IFCA conference workshops. It’s the best tool we’ve found for content planning. \n\n
  • Notice it covers the three most important parts of any communications project:\n\nContent: What you want the audience to know\n\nPurpose: What you want people to think and/or do\n\n\nAudience: Who you want to reach and what they want to know\n\nI fill this out by using the information we have at hand, by asking the client questions to gather necessary information, or in a group with all the stakeholders working through the process. (I like the last best, by the way). It enables the important players to be a part of the discussions so they understand how we arrive at the decisions we make. This saves a lot of time later in the process because everyone knows the score going in. \n
  • Notice it covers the three most important parts of any communications project:\n\nContent: What you want the audience to know\n\nPurpose: What you want people to think and/or do\n\n\nAudience: Who you want to reach and what they want to know\n\nI fill this out by using the information we have at hand, by asking the client questions to gather necessary information, or in a group with all the stakeholders working through the process. (I like the last best, by the way). It enables the important players to be a part of the discussions so they understand how we arrive at the decisions we make. This saves a lot of time later in the process because everyone knows the score going in. \n
  • Notice it covers the three most important parts of any communications project:\n\nContent: What you want the audience to know\n\nPurpose: What you want people to think and/or do\n\n\nAudience: Who you want to reach and what they want to know\n\nI fill this out by using the information we have at hand, by asking the client questions to gather necessary information, or in a group with all the stakeholders working through the process. (I like the last best, by the way). It enables the important players to be a part of the discussions so they understand how we arrive at the decisions we make. This saves a lot of time later in the process because everyone knows the score going in. \n
  • Notice it covers the three most important parts of any communications project:\n\nContent: What you want the audience to know\n\nPurpose: What you want people to think and/or do\n\n\nAudience: Who you want to reach and what they want to know\n\nI fill this out by using the information we have at hand, by asking the client questions to gather necessary information, or in a group with all the stakeholders working through the process. (I like the last best, by the way). It enables the important players to be a part of the discussions so they understand how we arrive at the decisions we make. This saves a lot of time later in the process because everyone knows the score going in. \n
  • Notice it covers the three most important parts of any communications project:\n\nContent: What you want the audience to know\n\nPurpose: What you want people to think and/or do\n\n\nAudience: Who you want to reach and what they want to know\n\nI fill this out by using the information we have at hand, by asking the client questions to gather necessary information, or in a group with all the stakeholders working through the process. (I like the last best, by the way). It enables the important players to be a part of the discussions so they understand how we arrive at the decisions we make. This saves a lot of time later in the process because everyone knows the score going in. \n
  • Notice it covers the three most important parts of any communications project:\n\nContent: What you want the audience to know\n\nPurpose: What you want people to think and/or do\n\n\nAudience: Who you want to reach and what they want to know\n\nI fill this out by using the information we have at hand, by asking the client questions to gather necessary information, or in a group with all the stakeholders working through the process. (I like the last best, by the way). It enables the important players to be a part of the discussions so they understand how we arrive at the decisions we make. This saves a lot of time later in the process because everyone knows the score going in. \n
  • Let’s start with the people. Who are the people my client’s trying to reach? Healthcare professionals in pediatrics, primary care, emergency medicine, infectious disease and public health. And what are the questions they’re likely to have about this topic?\n\nWho’s presenting? \nWill continuing medical education credits be offered?\nWhy should I invest time in a non\n
  • Now, let’s hit the purpose. Remember, this is what you want your audience to think or do after they read, watch, listen to your content. \n\nFirst, the THINK. For our project, we want the audience to be clear that they don’t know enough about treating rabies, so they should tune into the webinar. We also want them to think their friends should know more, too. \n\nThen, the DO. That call to action we love so much. This is pretty straight-forward. We want our audience to register and attend the webinar, and to encourage friends to do the same.\n
  • You may have a lot of discussion around the idea and details – and that’s good. You really want to nail it down here so you have a good map for creating the master text.\n\nStart with the main idea, the most important thing the audience needs to know. This should be a complete sentence. That’s because if you can’t create a complete thought about the most important thing you want your readers to know, you may need another main idea!\n\nIn our example, our main idea is: People die every year from rabies because they don’t get the proper care from healthcare professionals who are unsure of how to treat potential exposures. \n
  • Now, what are the details – the evidence, examples and explanations -- that will help the audience understand what you’re talking about – and answer a few of their questions. \n\nExamples are little stories and anecdotes that are great for people who don't need convincing.\n\nEvidence is the metrics or statistics that provide proof for the explanation or example and is most meaningful to decision-makers.\n\nExplanations support examples and technical terms, and are best for readers who are curious. \n\nYou don’t need to use all three of the Es, necessarily, but you want to include the kinds of details that resonate most with your audience.\n
  • In our case, we focused on evidence and explanation.\n\nEvidence. We use data points from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.\n\nExplanation. We explain why healthcare professionals should come and mention the credibility of the speakers.\n
  • Here’s the whole CPA. It’s the best road map you have for creating any content package – or even a single document. It’s the choir book we can all sing from, too, because it makes a nifty project brief for approvals and project management.\n
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  • Thanks for having me today. I'm excited to talk to you about how to work smarter, not harder, to get more from your content. \n
  • How to Get More from Your Content

    1. 1. Work Smarter, Not Harder,to Get More from Your Content Margot Carmichael Lester The Word Factory ⓒ2011 Margot Carmichael Lester/The Word Factory
    2. 2. Content is King We’re the PowerBehind the Throne
    3. 3. Biggest Content Challenges Source: PRNewswire
    4. 4. Biggest Content Challenges • Finding time to manage content • Choosing the most effective and cost-efficient distribution • Securing proper sources for contentChallenges 0 15 30 45 60 Source: PRNewswire
    5. 5. The old way
    6. 6. The old wayClient comes to us Then they wantfor a piece. another form.We do it. And Another.Then they want And another.another piece basedon the same We start over everyinformation. time. Or at least waste cycles.We get back up tospeed and dig back in. Calgon, take me away!
    7. 7. A better wayEasier to do all forms at once.Faster because of fewer cycles andrestartsLess message dilution and project creepFewer shenanigans in general
    8. 8. Instead of focusing on the task, focus on the purpose.
    9. 9. The Content Supply Chain
    10. 10. Data/Information
    11. 11. Data/InformationThe Source WatersBusiness goals Editorial calendarsUser data & analytics Product launchesMarketing & sales data HR & employee relations initiativesCRM initiatives Marketing & PR activities
    12. 12. Content Creation
    13. 13. Content CreationThe Process User Interface/User Experience Quality & Technical Standards Drafting Planning/Pre-Writing Revising Filtering Editing Sourcing & Researching Publishing
    14. 14. Distribution
    15. 15. DistributionDownstream Channels Social Media Associations/Trade Groups Traditional Media Internal Communications Corporate Web Business Development Sales Communications Clients & Customers
    16. 16. The Content Supply Chain
    17. 17. Don’t wait for clients to tell you what they want. be proactiveand plan for other forms that will meet their goals.
    18. 18. One Source; Many Forms
    19. 19. That’s a slew of formsfrom one master text!
    20. 20. One Source; Many forms.
    21. 21. One Source; Many forms. More channels and forms from one document means: More effective communications Less message dilution and project creep Better use of your time Increased productivity & cost efficiency
    22. 22. The content supply chain helps youcreate more value for your clients, your department and your boss.
    23. 23. The Strategic Process
    24. 24. Create Contentthat Meets Business Goals
    25. 25. Create Contentthat Meets Business Goals Determine purpose and audience for master text Research and write master text Consider all reasonable genres, channels and forms Filter through purpose and audience Create final content mix
    26. 26. Goal Get healthcare professionals to attend an informational webinarVehicles Direct mail invitation One-pager for relevant associations and trade groups
    27. 27. Additional forms of communicationwould: Meet their goals Get the message to the right people more effectively Allow us to create all materials at one time
    28. 28. The new forms amplify the effect of the original in ways that are consistent with clients’ goals.
    29. 29. Old way: Time and money wastedNew way: Time and money saved
    30. 30. doing as much as possible up frontcuts the over all time you spend on any given project, freeing you up to serve more clients and solve other problems.
    31. 31. Goal Get healthcare professionals to attend an informational webinarVehicles Direct mail invitation One-pager for relevant associations and trade groups
    32. 32. One Source; Many Forms
    33. 33. The process:
    34. 34. The process: Determine purpose and audience for master text Research and write master text Consider all reasonable genres, channels and forms Filter through purpose and audience Create final content mix
    35. 35. The Process
    36. 36. DetermineAudience& Purpose
    37. 37. Content-Purpose-AudienceMy Best Tool for Content Strategy
    38. 38. The C-P-A
    39. 39. The C-P-AContent Purpose Audience Ideas What the Who you are audience targeting Details should think What they Evidence What the want/need to audience do should do Examples Explanations
    40. 40. Start with the Audience Audience Who you are targeting What they want/need to do
    41. 41. Start with the Audience Audience Who you are targeting What they want/need to do
    42. 42. Identify the PurposePurpose What the audience should think What the audience should do
    43. 43. Identify the PurposePurpose What the audience should think What the audience should do
    44. 44. Decide on the Content Main Idea The most important thing you want your audience to know. TIP: Lots of discussion about the main idea is good!
    45. 45. Decide on the Content Main Idea The most important thing you want your audience to know. TIP: Lots of discussion about the main idea is good!
    46. 46. Establish details with:Examples: Little stories and anecdotes that aregreat for people who dont need convincing.Explanations: Definitions that supportexamples or clarify technical terms that helpreaders who are curious and ask why. Evidence: Metrics or statistics that provide prooffor an explanation or example and are most
    47. 47. Establish the Details Key details Support your main idea TIP: You don’t have to use all the Es TIP: Use only 3-5 details
    48. 48. Establish the Details Key details Support your main idea TIP: You don’t have to use all the Es TIP: Use only 3-5 details
    49. 49. Our content plan
    50. 50. One Source; Many Forms
    51. 51. Create filtersThe Targets T-Chartshows where the client wants theinformation to go and whereresearch shows the audience getsits information.
    52. 52. Create filtersThe Targets T-Chartshows where the client wants theinformation to go and whereresearch shows the audience getsits information.
    53. 53. Our final content mix
    54. 54. Biggest Content ChallengesChallenges 0 15 30 45 60 Source: PRNewswire
    55. 55. Biggest Content Challenges • Finding time to manage content • Choosing the most effective and cost-efficient distribution • Securing proper sources for contentChallenges 0 15 30 45 60 Source: PRNewswire
    56. 56. The Strategic Process in detail
    57. 57. Step One:
    58. 58. Step One:Use the CPA todetermine theaudience andpurpose of themaster text.
    59. 59. One Source; Many Forms
    60. 60. Step Two:
    61. 61. Step Two:Brainstorm allpossible channelsand forms.
    62. 62. Steps Three, Four & Five:
    63. 63. Steps Three, Four & Five:Push options through audience andtargets filters.
    64. 64. The power behind the throne.
    65. 65. Step six:The power behind the throne.
    66. 66. What the process gets you
    67. 67. What the process gets youClearly mapped content strategyA focus for genres and formsA channel strategy for target audiencesA plan to create lots of content effectively
    68. 68. A more strategic approachto content creation allows you to serve clients more effectively and use your resources more efficiently.
    69. 69. Save my time.Save my clients’ Money.Get results clients &bosses love.
    70. 70. Thank You! Margot Carmichael Lester margot@thewordfactory.com @word_factory ⓒ2011 Margot Carmichael Lester/The Word FactoryContent-Purpose-Audience ⓒ2011 Teaching That Makes Sense, Inc. Used by permission.

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