Media Literacy Use in Classroom

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A program presented to Religious Educators to promote creating media in the classroom. Videos were inserted into the program and may not show up on Slideshare.

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  • Notes to presenter:
    The Media Education: Make It Happen! presentation is part of an awareness program that includes this PowerPoint workshop, a facilitator's guide with handouts, and a companion booklet. These resources are available free to download from <www.mediaeducationweek.ca>
    Arrows () indicate when to click the mouse to make text or images appear on the screen.
     (Next Slide)
  • To be alive in the spirit in our day and age is to be able to say at any given moment with the disciples on their way to Emmaus: “Were not our hearts burning within us as he talked with us along the way?” (Luke 24:32).
  • Much of the information in this presentation is from the Media Education: Make It Happen! booklet. The booklet was made possible through the collaboration of the following organizations:
    MediaSmarts;
    Canadian Teachers’ Federation;
    Association for Media Literacy; and the
    Canadian Association of Media Education Organizations.
     (Next Slide)
  • The purpose of this workshop is to give teachers an overview of what media education is and to offer a starting point for bringing media literacy lessons and activities into the classroom.
     We’ll begin with a snapshot of young people’s media environment;
     we’ll answer the question, “What is media literacy?”;
     we’ll examine media education approaches that include key concepts and a framework for deconstructing media; and
     we’ll look at practical ways for integrating media education across the curriculum.
     (Next Slide)
  • For young people, who often spend more time interacting with media than they do with parents, teachers and even friends, media can be a powerful influencing force.
     Cumulatively and unconsciously, the media messages kids absorb help to shape their perceptions of what is normal and important, cool and fun, or scary and unappealing.
     (Next slide)
  • We’re going to start today with a warm-up activity that will illustrate the powerful influence media images have on us. This alphabet has been created from parts of well-known brand logos. See how many of the brands you recognize.
    Corporate branding is just one aspect of media to which we are exposed. However, we are familiar with branding from an early age. Babies as young as six months can form mental images of corporate logos and mascots. Brand loyalties can be established as early as age two, and by the time children head off to school most can recognize hundreds of brand logos.
     (Next Slide)
  • Canadian kids are very active media consumers. In 2003, the Canadian Teachers’ Federation conducted a national survey of more than 5,700 students, in Grades 3 to 10, about their media use. The study showed the following:
     75 per cent of children watch TV daily;
     almost half (48 per cent) of kids have their own TV set;
     60 per cent of boys in Grades 3-6 play video or computer games almost every day; and
     42 per cent of kids watch videos or DVDs several times a week.
    (Next slide)
  • Canadian students are also among the most wired in the world. In 2005, MediaSmarts surveyed more than 5,200 students about their digital media use and found the following:
    “meme” (pronounced meem). An Internet meme is a video, photo or idea that spreads from person to person and is altered or combined with other videos and photos.
     94 per cent have Internet access at home and the majority have high speed connections;
     37 per cent have their own Internet-connected computer;*
     41 per cent have an MP3 player; and
     22 per cent have webcams on their computers.
    (*Twenty per cent of Grade 4 students have their own access. That number climbs to 51 per cent by Grade 11. This is significant because students with their own Internet connection spend twice as much time online as those who share a connection.)
    (Next slide)
  • Most of this generation can barely remember a time when e-mail, instant messaging, online music, Webcams, text messaging and cell phones were not part of their lives.
     While many adults struggle with new technologies, teens and children embrace them, learning intuitively or from their peers. They multi-task effortlessly through the complex mix of sound, graphics, text and images. With new technologies comes empowerment. Suddenly kids have become managers, creators and distributors of information. They access what they want, when they want it.  (Next Slide)
  • As kids interact with media, they absorb a large portion of their knowledge about the world and their perceptions of themselves and others.
     In order to be literate in this media-rich environment, young people need to develop knowledge, values and a whole range of critical thinking, communication and information management skills. In other words, they need media literacy skills.
     (Next Slide)
  • Media literacy is commonly defined as the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and produce media. It’s the process of becoming active, rather than passive, consumers of media.
     (Next Slide)
  • Media education is the essential tool in helping kids acquire media literacy skills. It is the process of teaching and learning about the media so that the learners acquire media literacy knowledge and skills. (Next Slide)
  • Media education includes the following:
     learning hands-on production techniques;
     recognizing how the various elements of a specific medium convey meaning; and
     thinking critically about media issues and media influences.
     (Next Slide)
  • Educators may understand the importance of developing critical literacy skills in their students. However, integrating media literacy into the classroom can seem overwhelming, whether it is being done formally or informally.
    Teachers needn't be apprehensive. Here’s why. First of all, media are a part of life all kids enjoy and share. It’s a stimulating and relevant topic for them – something they all have an opinion about and enjoy discussing. And they love the power that comes with understanding that all media productions – be it a drama or documentary, news report or advertisement – are constructed with a viewpoint and for a reason.
    As teachers, you know that interested, engaged children are the departure point for effective learning.
     (Next Slide)
  • Media is something that most of us have in common. While students may have more familiarity with certain kinds of media (such as video games and the Internet) it is also quite possible that teachers and students will have shared media experiences.  (Next Slide)
  • Because media literacy is based on the process of enquiry, it isn’t about having the right answers. Rather, it’s about asking the right questions. Here are some examples.
     Who is the audience for a media production and why?
     From whose perspective is a story being told?
     How do the unique codes and conventions of a specific genre affect what we see, hear or read?
     How might different audiences interpret the same media production?
     Whose interests are being served?
    The teacher as a facilitator and co-learner in a student-centred learning process is not only the model for media education; it has also become an accepted new critical pedagogy.
     (Next Slide)
  • Media literate people know how to act; they are not acted upon and as a result, they are better citizens. The goal of media education is to produce good citizens, not good consumers. Media literacy is not so much about changing the media, rather it is about changing people's attitudes, reactions, and feelings in response to it. Mass media and communications will increasingly dominate tomorrow's world. Today's generation and generations of the future will need to understand how the mass media influence society, influence their character, and their values. (2001) Pat Kipping
    For many children today, the family is not the primary moral teacher. Nor is the church the moral educator that it once was. Trends such as rising youth violence, increasing dishonesty, growing disrespect for authority, peer cruelty, decline in work ethic, sexual precocity, growing self-centeredness, and ethical illiteracy are on the rise (Noll, 1999). Developmental psychologist Thomas Likona, a leading supporter of a new character education movement, suggests that this decline of American youth is the result of a decline of the family and troubling trends in youth character (1991). Parents, clergy, and teachers do not have to look far to find a plethora of examples of media that blatantly denigrate respect, responsibility, trustworthiness, fairness, caring, and civic virtue. For instance, Playboy Playmates competed on a special episode of NBC's reality TV show Fear Factor, and ABC-TV aired a Victoria's Secret Fashion Show (Goodale, 2002). This prime-time television show was so explicit that the network decided it should blur out areas of the models' bodies!
    Scott D. Herrington and Cindy C. Emmans http://www.ait.net/technos/tq_11/2emmans.php
  • Most media educators use key concepts of media literacy as a foundation for examining media and popular culture. They provide a theoretical base for all media literacy programs and give teachers a common language and framework for discussion. The following key concepts are from the Ontario Media Literacy Resource Guide.
     (Next Slide)
  • Media are constructions.
    Media products are carefully constructed. They are created with a purpose and from a particular perspective using specific forms and techniques.
     Media literacy works toward deconstructing media products. It takes those products apart to show how they are made and explores the decisions and determining factors behind them.
    In addition, each medium has its own grammar and shapes reality in its own particular way. Different media will report the same event, but will create different impressions and messages.
     (Next Slide)
  • Audiences negotiate meaning.
    We all bring our own life experience, knowledge and attitudes to media we encounter. Each of us, in our own unique way, makes sense of what we see and hear.
     Media literacy encourages us to understand how individual factors such as age, gender, race, and social status affect the way we interpret media.
     (Next Slide)
  • Values and ideological messages underpin all media.
    Explicitly or implicitly, mainstream media convey ideological messages about values, power and authority. In media literacy, what or who is absent may be more important than what's included.
     (Next Slide)
  • Each medium has a unique aesthetic form.
    Each type of media has its own special grammar and technological bias and shapes reality in unique ways. Therefore, different media might report the same event but create different impressions and different messages.
     (Next Slide)
  • Now that we’ve looked at frameworks for deconstructing and analyzing media, let’s look at practical ways to make media education happen in the classroom. Movie on second photo (Next Slide)
  • Discussions and projects related to media lend themselves to many key learning objectives and outcomes, such as watching, listening, reflecting, writing, organizing ideas, expressing personal opinions, engaging socially and politically, and developing critical thinking skills. (Next Slide)
  • One is never too young to begin learning about media. Many of the topics that media education addresses, such as gender stereotyping, junk food advertising, body image and violence, are central to healthy development and can be addressed in the primary grades.  (Next Slide)
  • Now we’ll look at ideas to help you start integrating media literacy into the classroom. As you begin, keep the following in mind.
    Keep it positive! Playing on negative themes will be counter-productive to helping students develop critical thinking.
    Avoid moralizing. Kids will reject messages if they feel they are being “preached to” instead of being empowered to reach their own conclusions.
     (Next Slide)
  • Keeping up-to-date on young people’s media culture is important. A great way to get to know media your students enjoy is to start the school year with a quick class survey. Ask your students to create a list of "favourite“ TV shows, movies, video games, music, Web sites and so on.
     Not only does this process help you get to know your students, it also provides tremendous insight and direction for media literacy studies.
     (Next slide)
  • To familiarize yourself with youth media, visit the environments kids like. On television, watch this programming:
    Music channels (i.e., MuchMusic and MTV)
    Entertainment programs (i.e., eTalk and Entertainment Tonight Canada)
    Sports (i.e., TSN and Sportsnet)
    Cartoons (i.e., Teletoon and the Comedy Network)
     In your community, check these out, any of which may make for an interesting field trip, where students can deconstruct these environments as they would a media text.
    Independent music stores and video stores
    Vintage and independent fashion stores
    Comic book stores
    Malls
     Online, explore these technologies:
    Instant messaging technology (i.e. WhatsApp and Snapchat)
    Social networking sites (i.e. Facebook and Google+)
    Video-sharing sites and programs (i.e. YouTube and Vimeo)
    Kids’ favourite Web sites (refer to the handout List of Canadian Students Top 50 Favourite Sites)
    (Next slide)
  • Take advantage of “teachable moments” in the news. When an event grabs the attention of the news media, bring it, and all the excitement and debate surrounding it, into the classroom to analyze and deconstruct.
     (Next Slide)
  • Put kids in control of media, literally. It’s empowering for young people to see their own productions, hear their own voices and project their own viewpoints.
    Getting students to create simple media texts such as posters, photo essays and slideshows, and storyboards can be a great way for them to start thinking about the connections between text, producer and audience. When students start to create more complex texts using audio and video (such as commercials, newscasts, PSAs and podcasts) they will gain insights into the decisions and the process that no amount of reading can provide.  (Next Slide)
  • Negative stereotypes of young people in the media can be challenged if students become active in promoting more positive and balanced portrayals. The Media Toolkit for Youth is a resource on the MediaSmarts site that’s designed to help students understand what drives the news industry, why youth stereotyping happens, and how they can access the media to make their voices and issues heard.
     (Next Slide)
  • Teachers can become active in promoting media education in their communities by joining their provincial media education association. (A list of provincial media education associations is available as a handout in the workshop guide.)
     For more information on media education and how you can make it happen, visit the following Web sites for current information and resources:
    MediaSmarts , <www.media-awareness.ca>;
    Association for Media Literacy <www.aml.ca>; and
    Concerned Children's Advertisers <www.cca-kids.ca>.
    (A list of media education resources is available as a handout in the workshop guide.)
     (Next Slide)
  • Media Literacy Use in Classroom

    1. 1. Media Literacy:Media Literacy: Open Door forOpen Door for the Gospelthe Gospel
    2. 2. © 2013 MediaSmarts Pauline spirituality is about ways of seeing through the lens of the Gospels, taking the time to contemplate, discern, listen to and view deeply the world’s media culture. Pauline Center for Media Studies Sr. Rose Pacatte, fsp Were not our hearts burning within us?
    3. 3. OPEN WIDE THE DOOROPEN WIDE THE DOOR FOR CHRISTFOR CHRIST Through New Media LiteracyThrough New Media Literacy
    4. 4. © 2013 MediaSmarts
    5. 5. © 2013 MediaSmarts Media Literacy in the Church The Church’s own parish and school programs should be in the forefront of media education today. 41st World Communication Day.
    6. 6. © 2013 MediaSmarts • The great need for spirituality that young people have and the importance of new technologies are inseparable from their daily lives. • Today there is a new culture spreading rapidly through the new forms of mass media. This is an interesting challenge for the Church trying to find the right way to evangelize. New Evangelization
    7. 7. © 2013 MediaSmarts 1.To develop critical thinking skills through media literacy education/media mindfulness (10.b.3). 2.That media be the subject of catechesis and evangelization (10.c). National Directory for Catechesis: Two of the four main actionsTwo of the four main actions for teaching the faith:for teaching the faith:
    8. 8. © 2013 MediaSmarts Make It Happen! 1. Young people and media 2. What is media literacy? 4. Media Literacy in action: a) Connections b) Ready, set, go 3. Media education approaches
    9. 9. Young People and Media © 2013 MediaSmarts Media messages help shape their perceptions. Media are powerful forces in the lives of youth.
    10. 10. Young People and Media © 2013 MediaSmarts
    11. 11. © 2013 MediaSmarts The ABC’s of Brands
    12. 12. Young People and Media © 2013 MediaSmarts • 75% watch TV daily • 48% have their own TV • 42% watch several videos each week • 60% play video games each day
    13. 13. Young People and Media © 2013 MediaSmarts • 94% access the Net from home • 41% have MP3 players • 22% have webcams • 37% have their own connected computer
    14. 14. Young People and Media © 2013 MediaSmarts The WebText messaging Camera cell phones interactivity Multi-player videogames message boards BLOGS Webcams Personal Web sites MP3s E-zines emailInstant messaging Chat rooms In the digital media environment, kids have access to information and entertainment from around the world. Kids learn new technologies effortlessly, multi-tasking through a complex mix of sound, graphics, text and images. They have become managers, creators and distributors of information. meme
    15. 15. Young People and Media © 2013 MediaSmarts Young people need to develop knowledge, values, critical thinking, communication and information management skills. As kids interact with media they absorb knowledge about the world, themselves and others.
    16. 16. What is Media Literacy? © 2013 MediaSmarts • the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and produce media • the process of becoming active, rather than passive, consumers of media Media literacy is:
    17. 17. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts “ The process of teaching and learning about media. While media literacy is the outcome – the knowledge and skills learners acquire.” (David Buckingham) Media Education Source: Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture
    18. 18. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts 1. Learning hands-on production techniques 2. Recognizing how elements of a specific medium convey meaning 3. Thinking critically about media issues and media influences Source: Ontario Media Literacy Resource Guide Media education includes:
    19. 19. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Who can teach with media literacy? You can! The topic of media is energizing and engaging for students. 1
    20. 20. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Who can teach with media literacy? You can! 2 Because media is a shared experience, teachers and students can find common ground.
    21. 21. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Who can teach using media literacy? You can! 3 Media literacy isn’t about having the right answers; it’s about asking the right questions.
    22. 22. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts
    23. 23. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Right ? Who is the audience for a media production and why? What is going on?What is going on? From whose perspective is a story being told? How do the elements affect what we see, hear or read? What is really going on?What is really going on? How might different audiences interpret the same production? Whose interests are being served? What difference does it make?What difference does it make? What difference can I make?What difference can I make?
    24. 24. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts
    25. 25. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts What is going on?What is going on? What isWhat is reallyreally going on?going on? What differenceWhat difference does it make?does it make? WhatWhat differencedifference can I make?can I make? MediaMedia MindfulnessMindfulness © Gretchen Hailer, RSHM, Rose Pacatte, FSP
    26. 26. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Who can teach with media literacy? You can! 4 Media mindfulness expands media literacy education to include teaching, learning, and forming those with whom we share faith.
    27. 27. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Key concepts of media literacy provide a theoretical base for and give us a common language and framework for discussion. Source: Association for Media Literacy
    28. 28. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts 1. Become media literate 2. Teach using media literacy skills 3. Make media in the classroom 4. Use media in catechesis The concept of media literacy is not a means to inoculate against the influence of culture, but a way to assist in the development of "critical awareness."
    29. 29. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Media are constructions Media products are created with a purpose and from a perspective using forms and techniques. Media literacy deconstructs media products, exploring factors and decisions on how they were made. Source: Ontario Media Literacy Resource Guide
    30. 30. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Media construct
    31. 31. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Deconstruct media
    32. 32. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Audiences negotiate meaning We all bring our own experience to media we encounter. Media literacy helps us understand how individual factors affect interpretation. Source: Ontario Media Literacy Resource Guide
    33. 33. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Values and ideological messages underpin all media Media convey messages about values, power and authority. Source: Ontario Media Literacy Resource Guide
    34. 34. Media Education Approaches © 2013 MediaSmarts Each medium has a unique aesthetic form Each type of media has its own grammar and elements that shape reality in a unique way.
    35. 35. © 2013 MediaSmarts Media Literacy in Action
    36. 36. Media Education in Action: Course Connections © 2013 MediaSmarts Discussions and projects related to media lend themselves to many key learning objectives and outcomes: • watching • listening • reflecting • writing • organizing ideas • expressing opinions • engaging socially • developing critical thinking skills.
    37. 37. Media Education in Action: Course Connections © 2013 MediaSmarts Start young Many of the topics that media literacy addresses are central to healthy development and can be addressed starting in the primary grades.
    38. 38. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts Avoid moralizing Keep it positive
    39. 39. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts My Favourites – Mike W. Magazine: unknown Book: Calvin & Hobbes Movie: Speed TV Show: Cops & Simpsons Toy: Laser pointer Game: Grand Theft Auto Music Artist/Group: Green Day Song: Holiday & American Idiot Brand: unknown Food: Pizza and sugar Interests: Transportation Aspirations: Airline owner Magazine: bop, j-14 Book: Twilight Movie: Twilight TV Show: 90210, DeGrassi Toy: My little teddy bear Game: Angry Birds Music Artist/Group: Rihanna Song: Umbrella Brand: Converse, etnies Food: Pizza Interests: Music Hobbies: Devin  Aspirations: Lawyer A great way to get to know the media your students are interacting with is to start the school year with a quick class survey. My Favourites – Jessie
    40. 40. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts Familiarize yourself with youth media On television • music channels • entertainment programs • sports • cartoons In the community • music and video stores • vintage and fashion stores • comic book stores • malls Online • instant messaging technology • social networking sites • file-sharing sites and programs • kids’ favorite Web sites
    41. 41. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts Take advantage of “teachable moments” in the news. When an event grabs the attention of the news media, bring it, and all the excitement and debate surrounding it, into the classroom to analyze and deconstruct.
    42. 42. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts Creating content gives students insights into the decisions and the process of media production. We are Not only to become evangelists on the “digital continent,” but also to acquire “a profound knowledge” of the world of media and technology.  World Communication Day, 2009
    43. 43. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts Students can challenge negative stereotypes in the media by promoting more positive and balanced portrayals.
    44. 44. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts How you can get involved & learn more • MediaSmarts, www.mediasmarts.ca • Common Sense Media http://www.commonsensemedia.org • Association for Media Literacy • http://www.aml.ca • Concerned Children's Advertisers, www.cca-kids.ca http://zimmertwinsatschool.com/ http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/themes/lightscameraaction/ Creating Media: Catholic Kids & Media http://www.jclubcatholic.org/ Pauline Center for Media Studies http:// paulinecms.com/
    45. 45. Media Education in Action: Ready, set, go © 2013 MediaSmarts What is the message? The medium…
    46. 46. © 2013 MediaSmarts This workshop has been produced by For more information, contact: MediaSmarts www.mediasmarts.ca Pauline Books & Media www.pauline.org Sr. Margaret Kerry, fsp Mkerry@paulinemedia.com

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