• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Social Media Strategy Overview for Crouse Health Foundation
 

Social Media Strategy Overview for Crouse Health Foundation

on

  • 383 views

Social Media Strategy Overview for Crouse Health Foundation

Social Media Strategy Overview for Crouse Health Foundation

Statistics

Views

Total Views
383
Views on SlideShare
383
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Introduction RotoloClass = IST 686 – Social Media in the Enterprise Each student worked with a client in the area to create a social media strategy I worked with Gretchen Schroeder, who was interning at Crouse at the time, to compile a report on Crouse and CHF’s current use of social media and propose a suggested strategy While Gretchen focused on Crouse, I looked at Crouse’s social media presence and how Crouse Health Foundation can utilize the platforms C ommunity - working together R espect - honor, dignity and trust O pen and honest communication U ndivided commitment to quality S ervice to our patients, physicians and employees E xcellence through innovation and creativity
  • What is social media? While some people do use it to share meaningless information, the value is in sharing quality information, following other users who share valuable information, and personally connecting with other users.
  • These are the goals specific to CHF – so, how do you achieve them through social media? Donors : Over 1,500 unique donors in 2010 Individuals age 50s-70s give the most money per donation Average of gifts received each year is between 1.7 and 3 million   Main sources of donations: 25% avg. from special events (35% in 2010) 20% avg. from memory/honor (20% in 2010) 10% from direct mailing 40% rom major gifts (varies based on amount of campaigning, $800,000 in 2010) 5% from estate planning (very little in 2010) Donations from special events in 2010: $474,500 (Tribute) – 1000 attendees (Sept. 6, 2011) $167,200 (golf) – 250 attendees (maxed out) (3 rd Mon. in July) $30,000 (other) – Varied
  • Let’s take a look at the four social media platforms which we recommend using… what they are, what some key features are, and what we recommend How many of you use Facebook? Twitter? YouTube? Have heard of Foursquare? They have millions of users who sign on everyday! If Facebook were a country, it would be third in population after China and India There are so many different social media platforms out there, how do you chose which ones to use? Do you use them all? People prefer to receive information in different ways, and it’s up to the company to find out how to best reach their audience These four are the best tools we think that Crouse should be using
  • I assume most of you have been on Facebook before, but let’s take a quick look *Banding! Same across all! Wall to share info Goal is for people to “like,” comment, or visit the link Other tools: Info page Photos – events Events – for special events FBML – like a normal webpage with no interaction  we recommend this for Crouse Health Foundation
  • Quick explanation of Twitter what it is what about it is important Recommendations Tweet more in general – info about Crouse, CHF, health and community info 5 times a day Talk with people using @ mentions to have conversations Lists and followers – health industry, other hospitals, non-profits, social media professionals Use searches to listen in and respond Tweet chats Conversation with your customers, donors Expectation is quick responses, direct communication Wegmans policy is to respond to @’s in 24 hours, email is 3 days Used to share information Often used as an aggregator  news, social, etc. Lists Quick bursts of info that are easy to sort though and ad free
  • Quick explanation of YouTube what about it is important SEE not just read What makes it social? Comments and Likes Crouse uses YouTube very very well! Recommendations: Playlists and tags
  • Quick explanation of Foursquare what it is what about it is important real-time location based data how is it social? comments, push to Facebook and Twitter Recommendations Claim venues and fix incorrect information (Addresses, etc.) Leave fun and informative tips
  • Social media is a conversation, not an advertisement Use the tools to listen, participate, then lead There’s a conversation going on about Crouse and giving all of the time, why not be a contributing member? Are you talking AT people or WITH people? Expectations of quick responses
  • How do you market to the next generation? Why do 20-40s matter to you if target is age 50-70s? We aren’t set on a hospital yet Have old parents and probably children – or will soon Traditional marketing doesn’t reach us Expectations have changed Guest blogging – dr’s Create and disseminate valuable and free info Micro fundraising Ask for money on pay day - $5 to CHF instead of a latte
  • Overview about how you know if your efforts are working since you aren’t working with sales exactly and donations often fluctuate Quick look at what the four platforms provide Facebook: “Likes” Views Comments By day or by post Twitter: Followers Mentions Listed Search results YouTube: Views Comments Ratings Foursquare: Check-ins *Tips  Real Time info to visitors!
  • We recommend HootSuite What is HootSuite? – Hub! There are tons of other tools available Many are free Compare yourself over time Compare yourself to other users Most measure interaction and span of influence
  • 70-20-10 rule; share information and resources 70% of the time, engage 20% of the time, and self-promote only 10% of the time Build trust; be reliable, accurate, and approachable Become a recognized expert by producing and/or sharing credible information Be personal and genuine; speak as a human, not a corporation Pick a platform to start with such as Facebook OR Twitter; once one been built as a solid hub for engagement, then start build others. Once you have a following, they will follow you to other platforms and users on the new platforms will be able to see your built presence and trust you. Local but widely connected - you may want to connect with users in your local city or neighborhood, but you should connect with users around the world who can provide valuable information, expand your influence, and enhance your credibility “ Use a keyword location-specific search in Twitter for people in your area” and either listen to them, or engage with them (such as #Syracuse #CNY) Use metric systems that rate you and others Engage with other influencers to expand your reach and credibility No PUSH - Social Media is not a one way message, it is a two way conversation Transparency - Social media works best when you provide transparency and don’t come across as secretive, it let’s users get to know and trust you “ Social media, when appropriately deployed in healthcare will have the ability to broadly disrupt our ability to teach, learn, educate, and to propagate (and collect) appropriate content and information.”
  • HIPPA states that all healthcare providers, companies and affiliates must “take reasonable steps to ensure the confidentiality of communications with individuals.” Providers such as Crouse cannot make any statements that identify individuals as patients or any information that with enough detail that an individual be recognizable. Essentially – NO talking about patients without their explicit permission. Take conversations offline if you feel they are approaching the HIPAA line Consult with advisors before responding to or posting anything you may think crosses the HIPPA privacy line “ If they [a patient] choose to self-identify as a patient, or as a person with a particular illness, it is their right to do so. Health care providers are not liable if a patient states their persona health care information online.” “ Informed consent around social media participation must become part of the intake process if you are using social media as part of your practice outreach efforts.” “ If your practice has a Facebook page and asks clients to ‘like’ the page, you must inform them of the benefits and risks.” http://getbetterhealth.com/rules-to-ensure-a-hipaa-compliant-social-media-strategy/2011.04.03 http://drsusangiurleo.com/health-care-social-media-and-confidentiality/
  • Focus on building relationships, trust and conversation Relationships and trust should exist before explicitly asking for gifts Use short campaigns, focus on specific purposes and set goals Don’t let potential donors say, “I’ll do it later” During a giving campaign, focus on the giving Too many stories and information can pull users away from the actual act of giving, stories are best between campaigns Publically thank donors and share numbers Personal touch - use informal language People prefer fewer donation options Use ChipIn  less time, less info, more places
  • Donations from Tribute Night in 2010 $474,500 – 1000 attendees (Sept. 6, 2011) Set a goal for 2011 and promote it, give up dates, take photos of people donating, have people tweet that they donated Use Facebook and Twitter to extend the conversations at the tables to include voice from other tables and from those who are not in attendance Create a ChipIn with goal and end date for Tribute Night Use ChipIn to focus giving around this particular event and simplify the current web-based giving process Use incentives such as a raffle to encourage donations Showcase the total amount raised at the event Create a Facebook Event for Tribute Night Create it way in advance so it is visible and include a link directly to the ChipIn tool for quick and easy giving Highlight all Special Events on the CHF StaticHTML page along with detailed information about CHF and the ChipIn tool Repost articles and spotlights from last year’s event Ask for submissions of favorite moments from last year’s event Ask users why they are attending and what it means to them Encourage attendees to share pictures during the event on Twitter and Facebook Used a publicized hash tag for the event – #CHTribue and #Crouse Put Facebook and Twitter information on all materials prior to and at the event Publicly acknowledge and thank sponsor’s on social media platforms and co-promote Public recognition is often invaluable @POMCOGroup is on Facebook and Twitter – publically interact with them Create video teasers Interview people who are involved, include highlights from past years, and highlight projects which will be supported by donations to the event Have a photo scavenger hunt at the event using Twitter First to complete or find something wins a fun prize! Use Facebook and Twitter to extend the conversations at the tables to include voice from other tables and from those who are not in attendance Live tweet with photos and videos

Social Media Strategy Overview for Crouse Health Foundation Social Media Strategy Overview for Crouse Health Foundation Presentation Transcript

  • The Crouse Health Foundation: Maren Guse& Gretchen Schroeder #RotoloClass Syracuse University Social Media and Fundraising in the Heath Care Industry
  • What is Social Media?
  • Social Media for CHF Target Audience for Social
    • Goals:
    • Increase awareness of CHF
      • Share success stories
    • Increase number of donors
      • 1,500 unique donors in 2010
    • Increase unrestricted dollars
      • 42% in 2010
    • Strengthen relationships with donors and establish new relationships
  • Do You Use Social Media? 600+ Million 200+ Million 500 Million 8 Million & Growing
  • Behind the Curtain: Facebook
  • Behind the Curtain: Twitter Tweets are similar to a text message, short email, or instant message, but are public and can be searched and often provide information and links.
  • Behind the Curtain: YouTube
  • Behind the Curtain: Foursquare Foursquare is like a social/mobile “Sign-in” sheet where users can leave public comments about a place and share it with friends on Facebook and Twitter
  • Value of Social Media = Engagement Who are you talking to? Are they listening? If a donor calls, are you there to pick up? There’s a conversation out there about you – are you listening to it? Participating? Leading it?
  • Profile as a Friend: Know, Like, Trust
    • How do you market to the next generation?
      • Traditional media doesn’t work because it’s not there
      • Become a friend
    • Why do 20-40s matter to you if your target donors are age 50-70s?
      • Likely to not have a primary hospital
      • Will have to take care of parents
      • More likely to have children
    • Information Age
      • Free information has value
      • Create and disseminate
    • Micro Giving
      • Small amounts add up
  • How Do You Measure Social Media? Social Media Analytics
  • How Do You Measure Social Media? Analytic Tools
  • Best Practices for Social Media
    • 70-20-10 rule; share info 70%, engage 20%, & self-promote 10%
    • Begin by listing to the conversation about you, then engage
    • Build trust, transparency & expertise – presence represents organization
    • Be personal, genuine & human
    • Local but widely connected
    • Use keyword searches for location and topics
      • #Syracuse #CNY #hospital #donate #doctor #maternity
    • #Crouse - Unique keyword for searches and to follow conversations
    • Use analytic tools to understand your following
    • “ Social media, when appropriately deployed in healthcare will have the ability to broadly disrupt our ability to teach, learn, educate, and to propagate (and collect) appropriate content and information.”*
    *Howard Luks M.D. Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at New York Medical College, and Chief of Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy at University Orthopedics, PC and Westchester Medical Center http://orthopedic-social-media/social-media-in-healthcare-a-definitions-continuum/
  • But what about HIPAA?
    • HIPAA: All healthcare providers and affiliates must take reasonable steps to ensure the confidentiality of communications with individuals.
      • Cannot make any statements that identify individuals as patients
    • Get written permission from patients
    • Informed consent – inform your Followers of the benefits and risks
    • Take conversations offline
    • Consult with advisors
    • Patients can self-identify themselves
  • Social Media Best Practices for Fundraising
    • Focus on building relationships, trust and conversation
    • Relationships and trust should exist before explicitly asking for gifts
    • Use short campaigns, focus on specific purposes and set goals
    • During a giving campaign, focus on the giving
    • Highlight success stories
    • Publically thank donors and share numbers
    • People prefer fewer donation options
      • Use ChipIn  less time, less info, more places (analyze donations)
  • What others are doing: Red Cross
  • Ideas for Tribute Night or #CHTribute
    • $474,500 in donations in 2010
    • Set a goal for 2011 - promote it, give updates, encourage sharing
      • Create a ChipIn with target amount and end date
      • Ask users why to share why they are attending/donating
      • Use incentives such as a raffle to encourage donations
    • Create a Facebook Event – link to ChipIn
    • CHF StaticHTML page on Facaebook
      • Highlight Special Events, info about CHF, Embed the ChipIn tool
    • Used a publicized hash tag for the event #CHTribue and #Crouse
    • Allow users to register online
    • Have a photo scavenger hunt at the event using Twitter
    • Publicly acknowledge sponsor’s and co-promote (POMCOGroup)
    • Create video teasers - Interviews, highlights from past years, showcase projects
    • Live tweet with photos and videos, then post on social platforms after
  • Questions? There’s an app for that. [email_address] @marenguse