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The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator
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The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator

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The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator …

The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator

Presentation by David Gee, Former CIO, Credit Union Australia at the Australian CIO Summit 2014

Published in: Technology
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  • 1. Australian CIO Summit 2014 Gold Coast 28-30th July 2014
  • 2. The Shifting Role of the CIO as a Strategic Innovator • The 5 CIO’s – which one is you? • Know the Big Picture • Ready to engage (political savvy & conflict mgt) • 6 x 3 + 5 – 8 + 3 x 9 = Getting the Best from your Team • Partnering with external parties • SELL what IT does 2
  • 3. Where is this all going? 3
  • 4. 5 CIO’s - which one is you? Source: MIS Quarterly March 2011 4
  • 5. 5 CIO’s - which one is you? Utility CIO Evangelist CIO Innovator CIO Facilitator CIO Tight Rope Walker CIO 5
  • 6. 5 CIO’s - which one is you? Utility CIO  IT Supply Orientation  Reports to CFO  Strong Technical bias  Maintaining service levels  Ensuring the integrity of infra  Cost control  Service availability  Efficiency  On-time project delivery  Securing budget  Gaining Management attention  Stopping users DIY IT  Not Necessary as most interactions are operational Scope of Role Issues Critical to Success Performance Metrics Challenges Relationship with CxOs 7
  • 7. 5 CIO’s - which one is you? Evangelist CIO  Changing mindsets about info  Identifying sources of competitive advantage  Securing ‘face time’ with CxOs  Maintaining existing IT performance levels  Attendance of CxOs at ITSC  Maintaining service levels  Number of ‘converts’  Securing availability of a pilot budget  Understand the business & industry in detail  Securing ‘airtime’ with senior executives  Establishing credibility with business colleagues  Sporadic  Fighting for time with CxOs. Scope of Role Issues Critical to Success Performance Metrics Challenges Relationship with CxOs 8
  • 8. 5 CIO’s - which one is you? Innovator CIO  Delivering opportunities for securing advantage  Raising profile of the IT unit as a business partner  Delivering meaningful business innovations  Securing business commitment for significant business change  Appointing Demand managers  Being part of the strategy process  Value of Innovations developed  Requests for additional service  Ensuing continued investment in strategic opportunities  Limiting key operational & support apps  Gaining active governance of IT at board  Regular formal and informal meetings  Challenges valued by CxOs. Scope of Role Issues Critical to Success Performance Metrics Challenges Relationship with CxOs 9
  • 9. 5 CIO’s - which one is you? Facilitator CIO  Empowering & enabling the business with info capabilities  Levering IT assets  Encouraging info ownership by the business  Preparedness of the business to adopt new skills  Training & supporting capabilities to enable business innovation with IT  Outstanding ROI from Information  Achieving competitive advantage from info exploitation  Managing migration of IT innovation into the business  Letting go  Trusted partner Scope of Role Issues Critical to Success Performance Metrics Challenges Relationship with CxOs 10
  • 10. 5 CIO’s - which one is you? Tight Rope Walker CIO  Developing agile infrastructure  Coordinating organisational info & technology requirements  Maintaining service levels  Identifying emerging technologies  Ensuring integrity & agility of technical architecture  Reading the technology marketplace  Guaranteeing security & privacy  Service availability  Customer satisfaction  Technology responsiveness  Staying at the cutting edge of technology  Managing intelligent & demanding users  Setting technical standards & policies]  Speed of response  Advisor on policies, risks & technical capabilities Scope of Role Issues Critical to Success Performance Metrics Challenges Relationship with CxOs 11
  • 11. 5 CIO’s – did you figure out yourself? Utility CIO Evangelist CIO Innovator CIO Facilitator CIO Tight Rope Walker CIO 12
  • 12. Can you see the bigger picture? 13
  • 13. David’s 5 Expectations Monday September 5th 2011 1. Winning Team o Accountability for getting results but do this as a team 2. Punch above your weight o Bring your brains to CUA everyday o Challenge the status quo 3. Being uncomfortable is normal o Contribute outside of your comfort zone o Learning Agility (sharpening your own sword) 4. Strive to be a Change Agent + Trusted Advisor o Drive change & influence business direction 5. Have fun o Enjoy work and your life
  • 14. What Culture that you want? Drive the culture to desired end state 15
  • 15. Where are we going - @ 10,000 Feet 16
  • 16. The Bigger Picture - know your numbers 17
  • 17. The Bigger Picture - communicate...communicate 18
  • 18. Ready to engage – Build team’s Political Saavy 19
  • 19. “Leadership is a Contact Sport” • Personal touch matters • Frequent follow-up works • Inside & Outside coaches Source: Marshall Goldsmith 20
  • 20. Political Savvy & Conflict Management Source: Patrick Lencioni 21
  • 21. Avoiding a Dysfunctional team Source: Patrick Lencioni Unwilling to be vulnerable Feigning buy-in for group decisions Seek artificial harmony over debate Focus on personal success above team Not calling on peer behaviour 22
  • 22. Wolf CIO • Are you a hunter or just food? • Do you stay on the Light side and never enter the Dark? • When is manipulation required? Source: Gartner 23
  • 23. How to handle Conflict ? 24
  • 24. Person E Person H Person D Person F Person C Person B Person G Wolf Jnr Person A Approach to POWER CIOs with a Lamb power approach are often driven by a desire to be liked and likeable. They enjoy having a positive working environment, and generally prefer not to stand out either positively or negatively. Many may view them as having an affable lack of ego because they tend not to be concerned with power or status. CIOs with a Jr. Wolf approach to power are driven to do what is best for the enterprise and aspire to get along with their colleagues. They tend to rely upon the positional power that comes with the role, or the power that comes from collaboration, and may inadvertently leave some power tools underutilized as a result. CIOs with a Wolf power approach are willing to go to the dark side, using power to get things done and gain respect, but they blend their tactics with lighter-side approaches to ensure likability. They know that sometimes using power is necessary to gain compliance, but they take care to avoid creating too much collateral damage when they do so Source: Gartner25
  • 25. Wolf Jnr Approach to MANIPULATION CIOs with Wolf manipulation approaches will go to both ends of the spectrum, blending both light and dark manipulation tactics at the same time to get the job done. They display a strong sense of values, but are not so inflexible in adhering to them that they cannot get the job done. They strive to be honest and trustworthy, but refuse to be an easy target for other manipulators. Overall, they focus first and foremost on what is best for the enterprise, rather than using their powers of manipulation for personal gain. CIOs with Dove behaviors are driven by a strong sense of values and beliefs. They have a set of principles around right and wrong which guides all of their actions. They believe that it is important to win the hearts and minds of others in order to expect their ooperation with any initiative. Challenges include: • Impervious to status and hierarchy, you prefer systems with fairness and equality • You may seem unrealistic, uncompromising or out of touch with others CIOs with Jr. Wolf manipulation approaches gather and use information primarily as a defensive maneuver against dark-side colleagues. They will seek to understand stakeholders and situations as well as possible before deciding how to proceed. Most often, they will cooperate with colleagues and give them the benefit of the doubt, but will protect themselves by documenting the interactions. Source: Gartner26
  • 26. Wolf Jnr Approach to WARFARE CIOs with Dolphin characteristics create followership by making people want to go with them by making the experience fun and enjoyable. Dolphins are the extroverts of the animal kingdom; they truly enjoy being with and leading people, and prefer peace to warfare. They consume information in the same way they consume schools of fish. Dolphins gather information about their followers, their enemies and their environment, analyze that information and use it to prevent warfare — but they succeed at warfare when they have no choice. 'CIOs with Shark characteristics are aggressive in the extreme. Others follow them because they know that in a battle these CIOs will win, and they fear being on the losing side. Shark CIOs amass a wide arsenal of powerful weapons, and create a fearsome reputation by taking down any competitors who get in their way. Sharks do form alliances, but because of their fearsome nature, usually their alliances are only with other Sharks. To succeed in warfare, Wolf CIOs master a blend of light-side social and information analysis skills and dark-side fighting skills. By periodically going to extremes and demonstrating both an understanding of their people and the environment and an ability to dispatch threats with extreme prejudice, they can grow and protect their territory while building a lasting peace. Wolf CIOs are highly disciplined and able to create well- organized campaigns that require long-term planning and multilateral tactics. They are also highly adaptable and can analyse large amounts of information, finding the most important data points, and adjust their tactics dynamically to suit the situation. CIOs with a Jr. Wolf approach to warfare are excellent planners who take a highly disciplined approach to creating partnerships and leading change initiatives. Their motto might best be described as, “the best defense is good planning,” Jr. Wolfs plan far in advance, and are highly transparent and clear in their approaches and communications. They prefer peace, but when they need to, they can organize complex IT initiatives resembling campaigns. Source: Gartner27
  • 27. Wolf Jnr Extreme Animal Profile You are a Light-Side CIO. Light-side leadership behaviors are positive and inspirational. CIOs need many stakeholders at multiple levels and across multiple business units to cooperate so that they can successfully complete complex IT-related initiatives. Many of the most strategic and high-value initiatives require creativity and enthusiasm both for the initiative and the leader. As a Light-Side CIO, you create loyal and enthusiastic followership. Unfortunately, it is not ideal to rely solely upon light-side behaviors. Some staff may not share your values, and therefore will be uninspired by them. They may have agendas that are more self-focused rather than enterprise- focused, or may be loyal to another executive and thus find themselves inadvertently in conflict with your goals. Most importantly, the intimate relationships established in such teams can leave you vulnerable and open to attack, with few options for defense. As a result, you must consider building your toolkit of extreme dark-side behaviors to help you evolve into astrongly balanced Wolf CIO. You are a Wolf CIO. For CIOs, the ultimate animal is the Wolf — an ideal balance of an intelligent, social creature that can inspire loyal followership and create group affinity; and the ruthless predator that can lead a pack of strong fighters, win in a competitive environment and command a large territory. Wolf CIOs display all of these qualities to lead highly complex IT organizations with an evolving purview as IT capabilities expand reach and range globally through information, mobility and social media. The territory of the CIO is no longer the basement data center; it now has the potential to reach as far as technology does. Yet as with the Roman Empire, with a greater territory to protect and maintain comes greater risks. As a Wolf CIO, you must always grow and maintain your arsenal to protect the valuable assets you have created. You are a Jr. Wolf CIO. A young Wolf, you show many signs of evolving into a full- fledged pack leader. You use the power that you have in the hierarchy, and strive to work collaboratively with others. You will compromise with others to make some progress rather than none. And you use information as a defensive tool to protect yourself and your team. The tendency to compromise is driven by a “middle ground approach” intended to avoid unnecessary conflict. This may result in a CIO appearing too malleable and predictable. Potential enemies will recognize that such a CIO is unwilling to go to extremes to achieve a goal. Unfortunately, the middle ground is not always safe and limits a CIO’s ability to be truly competitive. To evolve into a strongly balanced Wolf CIO, you should consider taking more risks, but in a calculated rather than reckless manner. Source: Gartner28
  • 28. Getting the best from your Team 6 x 3 + 5 – 8 + 3 x 9 = Team Outcomes 29
  • 29. Leadership Development Source: Lominger FYI30
  • 30. BehaviourExperience • Deep Knowledge of Analytics • Working level of Business LOS process • How to effectively partner with others • Account Management • Time Management • Project Management • Experience in leading a stream of a large transformation effort • To proficient in Benefits Realisation • Drive the development of a new customer engagement models • Innovative - risk taking behaviour • Be agile by driving accountability and clarity across the organisation • Take stronger leadership in challenging the status quo and how things are done Skill Knowledge
  • 31. 1. Cultural sensitivity (Dwaili parties etc) 2. Weekly Partnership meeting 3. Weekly Fortnightly Executive Meeting 4. Monthly Senior Executive Meeting 5. Bi-Annual Senior Executive Meeting Vendor to Partner Relationship 32
  • 32. Marketing IT 33
  • 33. Questions 34

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