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This is the presentation we gave in 2009 during Agile Testing Days in Berlin. Even though it is already more than 2 years old, many things we said during the talk are very valid today. Some things did …

This is the presentation we gave in 2009 during Agile Testing Days in Berlin. Even though it is already more than 2 years old, many things we said during the talk are very valid today. Some things did not change at all.

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  • 1. Test Driven Development of Embedded Systems Marcin Czenko Martijn Gelens Wim van de Goor Agile Testing Days, 14 october 2009, Berlin
  • 2. • Test Consultancy at VIIQ. • Agile Test Team leader at Philips CareServant. • 10 years of experience in the Testing Field (7 years V-Model, 3 years Agile). • Some experience with coding. • Bachelor degree in Information Technics. • Married to Jeanne, has a dog (Sasha) and 2 cats. Martijn Gelens
  • 3. • Currently, Philips Software Engineering Services, MiPlaza, Software Designer. • Ph.D. in Computer Security from University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands. • M.Sc. in Software Engineering at Warsaw University of Technology. • 7 years of experience as an embedded software developer (SterKom (Poland) and freelancer). • Modelling Languages: my master thesis + one year internship at Institute National des Télécomunications (INT), Evry, Cedex, France. • Agile, test-invected since one year. • Married to Beata and also has two cats (Mufasa and Ursus). Marcin Czenko, Ph.D.
  • 4. Wim van de Goor • Agile Software Team Leader at Philips Software Engineering Services, Philips MiPlaza. • 8 years experience with eXtreme Programming. • Agile mentor and Coach. • Advised us on Agile Principles.
  • 5. Contents • Agile Testing What Do we want to do? • Constraints What can we do? • Agile Embedded Testing How do we test? • Conclusions
  • 6. What do we want ? • Prerequisites • Test Strategy • Acceptance Criteria • Continuous Integration • Testing
  • 7. Prerequisites • Testing is integrated in the team's Way of Working. • Acceptance Criteria are defined, discussed and explored beforehand. • Test Driven Development. • Continuous Build and Integration. • Testing is structured (specify, verify, report).
  • 8. Test Strategy • Product risks and mitigation. • Tester-role. • Definition of Done. • Quality gates. • Testing is structured (specify, verify, report).
  • 9. Test Strategy (cont.) • Deliverables from outside (also HW). • Issue procedure and attendees. • Reporting (test reports, PMI, ...). • Emergency scenarios.
  • 10. Test Strategy (cont.) The test strategy is build around the iterations and hardware deliveries.
  • 11. Acceptance Criteria • Defined upfront • Based upon Quality Attributes; functionality, usability, efficiency, maintainability, reliability, portability, etc... • Definition of Done: Tested and accepted, Code reviewed, documents written, yellow sticker on the note, ... • Quality Gate: Acceptance tests passed, smoke test passed, ...
  • 12. Continuous Integration Automate your: • Build procedure. • Release package creation. • Deployment to simulator. • Deployment to Board Support Package.
  • 13. Continuous Integration
  • 14. Continuous Integration
  • 15. Test Driven Development • Means: “Write unit tests before code”. • Integrate with your Continuous Integration environment. • Automate the Acceptance Tests.
  • 16. This is your framework
  • 17. Constraints
  • 18. Light to Heavy Light Heavy
  • 19. Light • No cross-compilation required. • Usually mainstream OS (Windows/Linux). • Wide range of testing/mocking frameworks available. • Standard hardware - no or very limited hardware level programming required. • No dependence on a particular vendor (supplier).
  • 20. Heavy • Small memory (no OS), limited performance, limited debugging possibilities. • Limited cross–compilers: often only C, and Embedded (Extended) C++ available. • Vendor specific. • Difficult to find a testing/mocking framework. • Custom hardware (ramp-up).
  • 21. Hardware design challenges
  • 22. Using Evaluation Boards
  • 23. Getting There (1)
  • 24. Getting There (2)
  • 25. Getting There (3)
  • 26. Getting There (4)
  • 27. Getting There (5)
  • 28. Getting There (6)
  • 29. Getting There (7)
  • 30. Development Board • Selecting the right board can be challenging (expensive ?). • Chip selection driven by the availability of the right board. • The board selection driven by the availability of the BSP and OS.
  • 31. Is there a more lean solution ?
  • 32. Are we lean ?
  • 33. Queue 1
  • 34. Queue 2
  • 35. Queue 3
  • 36. The effect on Agile Principles • Longer ramp-up time. • Resistance to modify hardware (introduces up-front design). • Limited response to changes. • Higher risk.
  • 37. How to proceed ? • Often we cannot remove queues & batches in HW development (are we going to be able doing so in any predictable future ?). • Reducing the queue size is also often not an option. • Is there a lean solution ?
  • 38. Getting There (7)
  • 39. Fix in between...
  • 40. Fix in between...
  • 41. How do we test ? Our experiences
  • 42. What do we need • Testing Strategy. • Hardware to work with. • Tool chain (compiler). • Testing Framework. • Mocking Framework.
  • 43. Compiler ISO C++ ANSI C
  • 44. Testing Framework Keep it simple ! Do-It-Yourself !
  • 45. Testing Framework (C) • Many frameworks are simple ports of the frameworks for PC-based development. • Increased stack consumption. • Dynamic memory allocation.
  • 46. CMock • Easy to understand. Easy to customise. Lightweight. • Comes with Supporting Ruby-based Mocking Framework. • Ready For “Heavy Embedded” - tests executed in batches.
  • 47. Testing Frameworks (C++) • Run-Time Type Information (RTTI). • Exceptions. • ISO C++ compiler needed. • Gnu or Microsoft are preferred.
  • 48. Testing Frameworks (C++) • We could not find a framework that compiles on GreenHills and WindRiver C++ compilers (forget IAR Extended Embedded C++). • It was cheaper and more effective to come with your own simple testing frameworks.
  • 49. yaffut • Our choice for unit testing in C++. • Just one header file. • Not meant for embedded: needs RTTI, and C++ exceptions. • Easy to understand and customise. We made an RTTI and Exception-free version.
  • 50. Mocking • We did not succeed in using existing frameworks. Our best candidate GoogleMock does not even compile and it is quite complex. • Does it mean that no one is doing TDD on embedded ? Probably not.
  • 51. Mocking - way to go • Think of your own framework. • We needed three “evenings” to create our own mocking framework.
  • 52. Educate your customer
  • 53. Educate your customer
  • 54. Conclusions • Agile in Heavy Embedded is a challenge: we cannot change it, but we can understand it and try to reduce its impact on agile software development. • The tester should be experienced in working with hardware, perhaps even more than a developer. • There is no one way: what you can do depends on the constraints you have (e.g. light to heavy). • Hardware development is far from being lean - and there is not that much we can change. • Development and support tools are far behind the needs of the agile teams. • Let your agile testing framework grow with your code.
  • 55. Conclusions • Agile in Heavy Embedded is a challenge: we cannot change it, but we can understand it and try to reduce its impact on agile software development. • The tester should be experienced in working with hardware, perhaps even more than a developer. • There is no one way: what you can do depends on the constraints you have (e.g. light to heavy). • Hardware development is far from being lean - and there is not that much we can change. • Development and support tools are far behind the needs of the agile teams. • Let your agile testing framework grow with your code. Be agile.
  • 56. Questions