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Common Core State Standards ELA Workgroup 2012

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This is a comprehensive training on the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards. The training took place over a few sessions.

This is a comprehensive training on the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards. The training took place over a few sessions.

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  • Find out what you know.How many of you have seen the current ELA Standards?Rate your knowledge of them: Very well, average knowledge, very little, none.Who knows when our current standards were adopted OSPI?
  • The why…One of the guiding factors behind adopting the new standards were the studies that showed that our students were not College and Career Ready after graduating from high school. This particular study is based on ACT benchmarks. It shows the percent of 11th grade students ready for college. We know there must be a change. We know ELA teachers are working hard, but how has this been working for us as far as results?
  • The next five or six slides gives you a birds eye view of the standards. This is the basic structureCommon Core State Standards are organized by: Strands -There are four disciplines within English Language Arts and Literacy. Do we know how many strands we have in ELA? Four: Reading, WR, S & L, and Lang. Topics -This is the major focus for particular grade level or grade bandStandard Statements - are essential knowledge and skills to be learned at each grade level or grade bandReminder: This is the ELA common core format. Math’s format is different.
  • This is a graphic to show you how it all looks. A big picture—not precise in the number of statements. How many standard statements in all? Forty-six. You can see the strands at the top, the topics in the middle and the standard statement at the bottom. Notice that the reading strand is the only strand with a sub-strand layer.
  • At its most basic organizational view, you can see the four main strands: reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language.
  • The next layer of organization is the topic layer.
  • This view shows each of the four strands with their corresponding topics.
  • TheReading strand has the most standards because it has a unique layer that we call sub-strands: literary,informational, and foundational skills (K-5 only).The topics for the sub-strands Reading Literature and Reading Informational Text are the same. They are: Key Ideas and Details, Craft and Structure, Integration of Knowledge and Ideas and Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity. The topics for Reading Foundational Skills are: Print Concepts, Phonological Awareness, Phonics and Word Recognition, and FluencyThere are ten standard statements for Literature as well as for Informational Text, and there are four standard statements for Foundational skillsTotal of twenty-four Reading Standard Statements. The standards are consistent throughout each sub-strand
  • Writing also has four topics with a total of ten standard statements. Topics: Text Types and Purposes, Production and Distribution of Writing, Research and Presentation of Knowledge, and Range of Writing
  • S & L has two topics, Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas with a total of six standard statements.
  • Language has three topics, Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use, with a total of six standard statements.
  • Again, this is the overview of how the strands, topics, and standard statements are organized. Note: the number of topics and standard statements in this view are not accurate in terms of numbers.
  • Here’s a look at one page from the new standards. It is broken up into three parts: the Strands, the topics, and finally the Standard Statement.Refer to the standards you downloaded for a closer view.
  • The CCSS has a specific coding system for each strands. Knowing this coding will be helpful when you are aligning your lesson plans to the new standards.
  • This is an example of what you may see. This helps you understand specifically which strand, topic, and statement you may need to access.
  • Note that there are sub standard statements for Language (3a). This is also the case for Writing as well
  • Every strand has a set of anchor standards. This was the first thing the writers of the CCSS created. Ten key skills every child should know which then branched off to specific statements for each grade/grade band. They are called the College and Career Ready Standards. Here’s an example of an anchor standards: CCR (College-Career Ready). R (Reading). 6 (Standard Six)This standard is expressed differently at each grade level.
  • The number of anchor standards directly correspond to the number of standards for each strand.
  • Each standard is aligned to its Anchor standard counterpart. The standards increase in complexity from one grade level to the next. Take Writing Standard 8 for example. Note at the end of grade 3 students recall, take brief notes and sort evidence into categories. At the end of grade 6 the student is required to use relevant information, assessing credibility, avoiding plagiarism and create a basic bibliography. At the end of grade 9 students collect information from authoritative sources, use search strategies effectively, assess the sources, maintain a flow of ideas and use a standard format for citation. The Anchor standard reflects a student that is college and career ready and serves as a summary of the skills necessary for this writing standard.
  • What are we currently doing in our schools to support this articulation? What can we begin to do to prepare our students for the CCR standards?
  • An additional component of the CCSS are the Literacy Standards.Note: Technical Subjects definition. Who is responsible for teaching the standards: All teachers. Designed to be addressed by all teachers. In the next video you will see a clip of David Coleman explaining the reasoning behind the Literacy Standards.
  • As the video points out, the literacy standards support knowledge building in a content areas.
  • We know that sometimes by grades 4-5 there are content splits, but K-5 teachers are masters at integrating literacy across the content areas.
  • This is where they are located in the ELA document.
  • The heavy lifting must be shared by all.
  • Other components that are critical to understanding the new standards are the appendices. In addition to the anchor standards and the Literacy Standards, there are three appendices that can further assist teachers.Appendix A makes for a great professional development opportunity for ELA teachers to read and discuss.Hyperlink to the documents to look at each individual Appendix
  • Appendix B—It is not a reading list! These are just examples of text that are appropriate for each grade level. The students will not be held responsible for the content from these texts. They are tested by skill—not content.
  • Appendix C- Examples of student writing that show what high-quality student writing LOOKS like at each grade level.
  • Less than half of students are prepared to read college level texts when they enter college. An average of forty-one percent remediation rate for students going into post-secondary education (ELA & Math). Community College percentages may be higher.
  • Why does it matter? In 2006, ACT Inc., released a report that found that students who equaled or exceeded the benchmark score on the reading portion of the ACT were able to answer questions associated to complex texts. It wasn’t that they could find the main idea or infer meaning better than those who scored lower—the study showed that in order for students to be college and career ready, they must understand that what they could read in terms of its complexity was just as important as what they can do with what they read (CCSS Appendix 2). To have this chance, students must have an opportunity to read more challenging texts.
  • The three-part model to measuring text complexity. All three must be taken into consideration when choosing texts for students. In the past, one of the three was more heavily emphasized over the others. Ideas? Quantitative—why is this? Again, have the teachers reflect on why certain texts are chosen over others.
  • Quantitative measures include the numerous formulas for determining readability of various text types. Flesch-Kincaid, Fry Readability, and Dale-Chall are examples with which some of you may be familiar. Currently the Lexile measures have been aligned to the Common Core’s push for more rigor.
  • Lexile levels:Green=1230Orange=1000Blue=780Yellow=530
  • Using qualitative measures of text complexity involves making an informed decision about the difficulty of a text. Literary texts with a single level of meaning tend to be easier to read than literary texts with multiple levels of meaning. Informational texts with an explicitly stated purpose are generally easier to comprehend than those with an implicit, hidden or obscure purpose.Text with simple, well marked and conventional structures are easier to read than those with complex, implicit, unconventional structures such as flashbacks or those with complex graphics whose interpretation is essential to the understanding of the text. Text with figurative, ironic ambiguous, purposefully misleading, archaic language makes a text more complex, as does one with domain specific language. A final dimension of text complexity is the life experiences and background the reader brings to the text.
  • Finally it must be understood that the readers brings his or her cognitive capabilities, motivation, topic knowledge, comprehension strategies, and experiences to the task of reading the text.
  • Students cannot answer the questions unless they have read the text.
  • Examples.
  • What types of shifts are required for teachers to implement the standards?Writing to sources: when teachers assign writing, it should be based on something students have read. We don’t want to lose creative types of writing assignments, we just want to make sure students can really synthesize and analyze what they have read. Too often we ask them to write to open—ended prompts from which they have no background knowledge. Research: teachers should not wait for senior year courses to begin research. Research can start as early as Kindergarten. Increase the number of short research opportunities.Marshaling arguments: Students must be able to support their claims with evidence. A common mistake students make is to believe that because someone said it, it is true. All arguments must be measured by the accuracy of the evidence that support them. Take a look at the writing strands on research to look at how this looks in a classroom (Writing Standard 8)
  • The tenprinciples that guide the instructional shift—1. This idea is taken to a whole new level with the CCSS. Students should have more opportunities to read shorter texts but spend more time with them. This is about depth vs. breadth. See David Coleman video Bringing Common Core to Life. This one hour video show exactly what is meant by close reading. (Gettysburg Address takes 3 days to teach even though it is only a 3 paragraph text.)2. Students need more exposure to complex texts. Research shows that when students test at a certain level of reading, teachers often keep them there throughout the year. They must be exposed to the levels of text complexity that demonstrate where they should be. They must know the target to get there, otherwise they will be content where they are. 3. Research shows that K-5 students are being exposed to only 7% of informational text. The new standards call for 50% at the elementary level, 55% at the middle school level and 70% at the high school level. (Note:These percentages represent the amount of reading the student does across the day in all content areas.)4. Frontloading information within the text, replacing the text with a video rather than reading the text, or easier versions of text. We often give them a summary of what they are going to read and inadvertently rob them of the reason to read the text. Allow them the process of inquiry so that they can discover what the text has to reveal.5. See the previous slides
  • 7. According to Mike Schmoker, unless students have the opportunity to read, write AND talk about something, they do not reach deep understanding. Presentations, Socratic Seminar, etc. are critical.8. Vocabulary – Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instructionby Isabel Beck.9. Does this mean grammar in isolation? Or the whole language approach? There must be a balance between both of these approaches.10. Students must be responsible for their learning. The move to formative instruction/formative assessment is a push in cultivating this independence.
  • Research shows when you annotate, understanding of difficult text goes up. It activates students, gives us visual evidence of thinking, causes careful reading, and teaches students how to think.We have to go beyond “assigning” to explicit instruction and ensuring thinking is involved.
  • Transcript

    • 1. English Language Arts Common Core Standards Orting School District CCSS ELA Workgroup March and April 2012Adapted from Ohio Department of Education and information from Washington’s CCSS Leadership Summit Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 2. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 3. Introduction to ELA CCSS Features David Coleman and Sue Pimentel, writers of the ELA CCSShttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1MVErnOD7c Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 4. STRUCTURE & FRAMEWORK Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 5. ELA Common Core Standards Framework The major areas or disciplines of study within Strands each content area. “What” studentsshould know and be able to do at each The main focus of the grade level and content within each Topics strand. band. Standard Standards Standards Statements Statements Statements by Grade Level by Grade Level by Grade Level Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 6. Standard Statement Topic Standard Statement (10) Standard Statement Literature Topic Standard Statement Standard Statement Topic Standard Statement (10) Text Standard Statement Topic Informational Standard Statement Reading Strand Topic 24 Standard Statements Standard Statement Standard Statement Topic only (4) K- 5 Founda- tional Skills Standard Statement Topic Standard Statement Topic Standard Statement Standard Statement Topic Standard Statement Statements 10 Standard Standard Statement Writing Strand Topic Standard Statement Standard Statement Topic Standard Statement and Standard Statement Strand Listening Speaking 6 Standard Statements Topic Standard Statement Standard Statement Topic Standard Statement Standard Statement Strand 6 Standard Topic Statements Language Standard StatementDr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 7. English Language Arts Common Core Standards SpeakingReading Writing and Language Strand Strand Listening Strand Strand Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 8. English Language Arts Common Core Standards SpeakingReading Writing Language and Strand Strand Strand ListeningTopics Topics Topics Topics (4) (4) (2) (3) Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 9. Key Ideas and Details Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Strand Reading Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Text Types and Purposes Production and Distribution of Writing Research to Build Knowledge Writing Strand Range of Writing Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge Strand Listening Speaking and Ideas English Language Arts Common Core Standards Conventions of Standard English Knowledge of Language Strand Language Vocabulary Acquisition and UseDr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 10. Sub Topics Standard Statement 1 Strands Standards Standard Statement 2 Key Ideas and Details Standard Statement 3 Standard Statement 4 Standard Statement 5 Craft and Structure Standard Statement 6 Standard Statement 7 Integration of Standard Statement 8 Knowledge Reading: Literature and Ideas Standard Statement 9 Range of Reading and Standard Statement 10 Level of Text Complexity Standard Statement 1 Standard Statement 2 Key Ideas and Details Standard Statement 3 Standard Statement 4 Standard Statement 5 Craft and Structure Standard Statement 6 Reading Strand Standard Statement 7 Integration of Standard Statement 8 Knowledge and Ideas Standard Statement 9 Reading: Informational Text Range of Reading and Standard Statement 10 Level of Text Complexity Standard Statement 1 Print Concepts Standard Statement 2 Phonological Awareness Phonics and Word Skills Standard Statement 3 Recognition Reading: Foundational Standard Statement 4 FluencyDr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 11. Writing Strand Topics Text Types Production and Research and Range and Distribution of Presentation of of Purposes Writing Knowledge WritingStandards Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 12. Speaking and Listening StrandTopics Comprehension Presentation of and Collaboration Knowledge and IdeasStandards Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 13. Language StrandTopics Knowledge Conventions of of Vocabulary Acquisition and Use Standard English Language Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6Standards Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 14. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 15. ELA Common Core Format Strands Topics Standard Statement Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 16. Common Core Coding• RL = Reading for Literature• RI = Reading for Information• RF = Reading Foundations• W = Writing• SL = Speaking and Listening• L = Language Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 17. Sample Code ReadingLiterature Standard 1 RL.1.1 Grade 1 Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 18. CCSS Coding Quiz W.4.3 Writing, Grade 4, Standard 3 RF.2.4Reading Foundations, Grade 2, Standard 4 L.10.3aLanguage, Grade 10, Standard 3a Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 19. Practice #1Complete questions 1-10 in the Understandingthe English Language Arts Common Core StateStandards handout. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 20. ADDITIONAL COMPONENTS Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 21. Anchor Standards• Broad, foundational standards that define skills that students must demonstrate in order to be college and career ready. – Example: CCR.R.6 • Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 22. Anchor Standards• Each strand has a set of College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards (CCR) – Reading – 10 Anchor Standards – Writing – 10 Anchor Standards – Speaking and Listening – 6 Anchor Standards – Language – 6 Anchor Standards Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 23. Anchor Standards Writing Standard 8Anchor Standard: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digitalsources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate theinformation while avoiding plagiarism. Grade 3: Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. Grade 6: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source, and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources. Grade 9: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 24. Practice #2Complete questions 11-13 in the Understandingthe English Language Arts Common Core StateStandards. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 25. LITERACY IN CONTENT AREAS Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 26. Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects • Standards for reading and writing in: – Science – Social Studies – History – Other Technical Subjects**A course devoted to a practical study, such asengineering, technology, design, business, or other workforce-related subject;a technical aspect of a wider field of study, such as art or music. (CCSSGlossary) Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 27. Literacy in Other Disciplineshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zHWMfg_8r0 Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 28. To What Grade Levels Do They Apply?• Grades 6 – 12• Why not K – 5? – The Literacy Standards are predicated on the assumption that K-5 teachers teach reading and writing across content areas. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 29. Where Are They Located?• The Introduction – pp. 1 – 8• K – 5 Standards – pp. 9-33• 6-12 Standards – pp.34 – 58• Literacy Standards – pp.59 - 66 Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 30. Who is Responsible for Teaching the Literacy Standards?“The Standards insist that instruction inreading, writing, speaking, listening, andlanguage be a shared responsibility within theschool.” Introduction to the CCSS, p. 4 Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 31. APPENDICES Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 32. Appendices• Appendix A – Explains the topic and standard statements that focus on text complexity – Research supporting key elements of the standards – Glossary of Key Terms Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 33. Appendices• Appendix B – Focuses on texts that can be used to meet the standards • Text Exemplars • Sample Performance Tasks Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 34. Appendices• Appendix C – Offers writing exemplars that highlight the standard statements • Student writing exemplars Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 35. KEY SHIFTS: TEXT COMPLEXITY Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 36. Several Key Shifts• Text Complexity – How do you decide what is the appropriate level of text complexity for your students when you assign reading? – Research indicates that the majority of students are presented with levels of text complexity below their grade level. They are not being S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-D. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 37. Text ComplexityStrand: ReadingTopic: Range of Reading and Level of Text ComplexityStandard 10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 38. Text ComplexityThose aspects of text complexity best Those aspects of textmeasured or only measurable by an complexity, such as wordattentive human reader, such as levels length or frequency, sentenceor purpose; structure; language length, and textconventionality and clarity; and cohesion, that are difficult ifknowledge demands. not impossible for a human reader to evaluate efficiently, especially in long texts, and thus today are typically measured by computer software.Those aspects of text complexity that focus on the variables specific to particular readers (such asmotivation, knowledge and experiences) and to particular tasks (such as purpose and the complexity ofthe task assigned) and the questions posed that must be considered when determining whether a text isappropriate for a given student. Determination best made by teachers using professionaljudgment, experience and knowledge of their students and the subject. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 39. The Common Core Standards Approach to Text Complexity• Quantitative – Those aspects of text complexity, such as word length or frequency, sentence length, and text cohesion, that are difficult if not impossible for a human reader to evaluate efficiently, especially in long texts, and thus today are typically measured by computer software. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 40. Sort for Text Complexity: Quantitative• Skim and scan the 4 informational selections.• Sort by Lexile level. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 41. The Common Core Standards Approach to Text ComplexityA Three-Part Model for Measuring TextComplexity: • Qualitative – Those aspects of text complexity best measured or only measurable by an attentive human reader, such as levels or purpose; structure; language conventionality and clarity; and knowledge demands. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 42. Analyze for Text Complexity: Qualitative• Skim and scan the green informational selection “School for Hope” by Kristof.• Use the “Text Complexity Rubric for Informational Texts” by Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium to analyze the selection for: – Purpose and meaning – Structure Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 43. The Common Core Standards Approach to Text Complexity• Reader and Task Considerations – Those aspects of text complexity that focus on the variables specific to particular readers (such as motivation, knowledge and experiences) and to particular tasks (such as purpose and the complexity of the task assigned) and the questions posed that must be considered when determining whether a text is appropriate for a given student. Determination best made by teachers using professional judgment, experience and knowledge of their students and the subject. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 44. Analyze for Text Complexity: Reader and Task Considerations• What reader-task considerations should we account for?• Review the text complexity analysis for quantitative, qualitative and reader-task.• Holistically, what is the appropriate placement for this novel? Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 45. KEY SHIFTS: TEXT DEPENDENTQUESTIONS Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 46. Several Key Shifts• Text-Dependent Questions – Require students to follow the details of what is explicitly stated and make valid claims that square with text evidence – Text-dependent questions do not require information or evidence from outside the text Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 47. Samples From the Gettysburg Address TEXT – DEPENDENT NONTEXT - DEPENDENTWhat are the people who are assembled at Have you ever been to a funeral?Gettysburg there to do?What is the unfinished work that Lincoln asks Lincoln says that the nation is dedicated tothose listening to commit themselves to at the proposition that “all men are createdthe end of the speech? equal.” Why is equality an important value to promote?Trace the meaning of the word “dedicate” Why did the North fight the Civil War?throughout the speech.(Lincoln uses it 6x) Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 48. KEY SHIFTS: WRITING TOSOURCES, RESEARCH ANDMARSHALING ARGUMENTS Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 49. Several Key Shifts• Writing to sources• Research (short projects)• Marshaling arguments (using evidence, evidence, evid ence) Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 50. 10 GUIDING PRINCIPALS FORELA SHIFTS Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 51. Ten Guiding Principles for ELA Instructional Shift1. Make close reading of texts central to lesson2. Structure majority of instruction so all students read grade-level complex texts3. Emphasize informational texts from early grades on4. Provide scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text5. Ask text-dependent questions Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 52. Ten Guiding Principles for Instructional Shifts6. Provide extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence)7. Offer regular opportunities for students to share ideas, evidence, and research8. Offer systematic instruction in vocabulary9. Provide explicit instruction in grammar and conventions10. Cultivate students’ independence Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 53. Systematic Instruction in Vocabulary• Read “A High-Incidence Academic Word List” article by Kinsella.• Practice “close reading,” – Underline key ideas/essential details – Circle any essential vocabulary terms – Triangle around words you are unsure of – Ask a question, make a comment, connection, application, agree/disagree … ? Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 54. Practice #3Complete questions 14-15 in the Understandingthe English Language Arts Common Core StateStandards. Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012
    • 55. Questions? Dr. Marci Shepard  Orting School District  Teaching, Learning & Assessment  2012

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