Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Regulatory	  Hurdles	  for	  Natural	  Gas	  VehiclesDeveloped	  by	  the	  Shale	  Gas	  Innova3on	  &	  Commercializa3on...
•     CNG	  and	  LNG:	  	  These	  terms	  refer	  to	  the	  two	  basic	  storage	  systems	  for	  natural	  gas	  fue...
In	  addi.on	  to	  these	  broad	  classifica.ons	  that	  are	  used	  by	  the	  states	  and	  the	  federal	  governme...
rules	  can	  result	  in	  substan.al	  fines	  and	  other	  penal.es.	  	  Based	  on	  the	  construc.on	  of	  the	  r...
• Outside	  Useful	  Life:	  	  vehicles	  that	  are	  beyond	  their	  official	  es.mated	  service	  lives.	  	  Service...
(PADEP)	  noted	  that	  standards	  promulgated	  for	  non-­‐road	  vehicles	  and	  engines	  have	  trailed	  equivale...
The	  EPA	  outlined	  its	  tes.ng	  procedures	  and	  costs	  or	  amounts	  that	  were	  recoverable	  from	  manufac...
There	  are	  a	  few	  regula.ons	  and	  standards	  that	  do	  apply	  specifically	  to	  natural	  gas	  conversions....
vehicles	  to	  meet	  regula.ons	  that	  differ	  from	  the	  federal	  or	  CARB	  standards.	  	  Thus,	  the	  Califo...
conversions	  and	  related	  modifica.ons.	  	  In	  Pennsylvania	  CARB	  standards	  apply	  to	  new	  vehicles.	  	  P...
Titling	  informa3on	  is	  available	  at:hp://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdouorms/fact_sheets/Modified_Vehicle.pdf	  andhp://www...
their	  ra.ng	  procedures,	  and	  risk	  management.	  	  Other	  natural	  gas	  vehicles	  are	  classified	  as	  off-­...
It	  is	  unlikely	  that	  this	  situa.on	  will	  change	  in	  the	  next	  several	  years.	  	  The	  current	  year...
115	  Technology	  Center	  BuildingUniversity	  Park,	  PA	  16802For	  ques.ons,	  contact	  Bill	  Hall,	  SGICC	  Dire...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Regulatory Hurdles for Natural Gas Vehicles

441

Published on

A white paper from the Ben Franklin Shale Gas Innovation and Commercialization Center that takes a look at both Pennsylvania and federal regulations (hurdles) when it comes to converting vehicles to run on natural gas.

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
441
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Regulatory Hurdles for Natural Gas Vehicles"

  1. 1. Regulatory  Hurdles  for  Natural  Gas  VehiclesDeveloped  by  the  Shale  Gas  Innova3on  &  Commercializa3on  CenterNovember  2012The  Shale  Gas  Revolu.on  is  now  firmly  entrenched  in  the  public’s  imagina.on  as  a  result  of  the  steady  decline  of  natural  gas  prices  from  above  $4.00/mcf  (mcf=thousand  cubic  feet)  to  $2.00/mcf  and  below.    At  the  same  .me,  oil  prices  have  spiked  and  remained  high,  typically  between  $85  and  $100  per  barrel.    This  has  caused  gasoline  prices  to  soar  above  $3.50  per  gallon  at  their  highest  point,  feeding  public  discontent  and  consterna.on  at  the  cost  of  driving  to  work  and  other  ac.vi.es.    Naturally,  the  public  has  prompted  its  leaders  for  solu.ons,  and  one  that  has  been  discussed  regularly  is  the  use  of  natural  gas  as  a  transporta.on  fuel.    At  current  prices,  consumers  might  save  up  to  60%  of  their  fuel  costs  and  spend  more  of  their  money  with  domes.c  producers  instead  of  foreign  oil  suppliers.Despite  the  public  clamor  for  using  natural  gas  in  vehicles,  there  has  been  only  limited  progress.    As  could  be  expected,  this  has  led  to  some  frustra.on  and  a  search  for  solu.ons  ranging  from  infrastructure  spending  to  tax  credits  and  financial  incen.ves  to  adopt  the  technologies  associated  with  natural  gas  vehicles.    Unfortunately,  many,  if  not  all,  of  these  efforts  face  difficul.es  due  to  the  regulatory  framework  that  surrounds  vehicle  and  engine  technology  at  various  levels  both  in  government  and  industry.    Together,  they  form  the  coils  of  a  Gordian  knot  that  restricts  the  deployment  of  natural  gas  vehicles  and  other  types  of  alterna.ve  fuel  vehicles.    The  regula.ons  are  confusing  and  oVen  overlap.    They  can  also  add  considerable  expense  to  the  introduc.on  of  an  engine  technology.    The  purpose  of  this  paper  is  to  outline  the  regula.ons  in  a  coherent  manner  and  discuss  their  applicability  to  natural  gas  vehicle  development.Some  important  terms  and  defini.ons  used  in  discussing  the  regula.ons  are  as  follows: • NGV:    This  abbrevia.on  stands  for  Natural  gas  vehicle  and  is  used  frequently  in  the  literature. • Dedicated:    A  dedicated  natural  gas  system  means  that  the  vehicle’s  engine  is  configured  to  only   run  on  natural  gas,  either  in  compressed  gas  or  liquid  form. • Bi-­‐Fuel  and  Dual  Fuel:    In  common  parlance,  a  bi-­‐fuel  system  allows  the  operator  to  select  either   natural  gas  or  a  liquid  fuel  (gasoline  or  diesel)  as  the  vehicle  fuel,  while  a  dual-­‐fuel  system  uses   both  natural  gas  and  a  liquid  fuel  simultaneously  in  some  ra.o.    In  the  former  the  vehicle  runs   en.rely  on  natural  gas  or  liquid  fuel,  depending  on  the  choice.    This  op.on  allows  for  flexibility   in  choosing  the  fuel,  and  alleviates  the  problem  of  opera.ng  in  areas  without  natural  gas  fueling   sta.ons.    In  the  laer,  both  are  mixed  according  to  availability  or  some  opera.ng  constraint.    It   offers  flexibility  as  well—most  systems  will  run  on  diesel  alone—and  is  intended  to  provide   maximum  savings  in  heavy  use  situa.ons  where  natural  gas  op.ons  may  be  limited.    However,   in  many  cases  these  two  terms  are  used  interchangeably,  and  some  regula.ons  cite  the  exact   opposite  defini.on  for  each.    Thus,  the  defini3ons  are  not  fixed,  and  readers  should  review  the   context  and  situa.on  to  understand  which  defini.on  is  being  used  for  a  term. 1
  2. 2. • CNG  and  LNG:    These  terms  refer  to  the  two  basic  storage  systems  for  natural  gas  fuel.     Compressed  natural  gas  or  CNG  is  simply  natural  gas  stored  under  pressure,  so  that  more  fuel   may  occupy  a  smaller  space.    LNG,  or  Liquified  natural  gas  is  stored  as  a  liquid  and  converted  to   gas  just  before  use.    Most  applica.ons  use  CNG  systems  because  LNG  systems  require  complex   storage  systems,  cryogenic  temperatures,  and  high  pressure  compression  facili.es  to   manufacture  and  use.    On  the  other  hand,  LNG  does  maximize  the  energy  density  of  natural  gas   by  turning  it  into  a  liquid. • Conversion:    This  term  refers  to  the  process  of  installing  a  cer.fied  natural  gas  fuel  system  into   an  exis.ng  vehicle  which  runs  on  a  liquid  fuel  system.    Conversions  generally  create  bi-­‐fuel  or   dual  fuel  vehicles,  but  can  also  create  a  dedicated  NGV.    Of  course,  vehicles  may  also  be  sold   new  with  any  type  of  natural  gas  fuel  system,  if  the  NGV  is  cer.fied  by  the  EPA  and/or  CARB,   depending  on  the  state. • Mixer  or  Venturi  Systems:    These  are  simple  fuel  systems  which  introduce  a  natural  gas  stream   into  the  engine  fuel  system  at  a  constant  rate.    Some  debate  exists  as  to  whether  or  not  they   can  create  significant  savings  for  vehicle  operators. • Sequen3al  Injec3on  Systems:    These  systems  introduce  the  natural  gas  into  the  engine  system   at  a  variable  rate,  determined  by  the  engine  computer’s  opera.ng  parameters.    They  are  more   sophis.cated  and  poten.ally  more  cost-­‐effec.ve  to  operate  than  the  simpler  Venturi  systems. • CARB:    This  refers  to  the  California  Air  Resources  Board,  the  California  rule-­‐making  body  for   emissions  regula.ons,  whose  decisions  have  a  na.onal  impact.  Regula.ng  bodies  also  classify  vehicles  by  type.    Generally,  these  classifica.ons  are  based  on  the  vehicle  size  and  primary  use.    The  EPA  and  other  bodies  typically  use  the  following  broad  classifica.ons  to  describe  vehicle  requirements: • Passenger  Cars  and  Light  Duty  Trucks:    Are  the  smallest  and  most  widely  used  vehicles  available   to  the  public.    In  general,  these  vehicles  are  rated  at  8500  lbs.  gross  vehicle  weight  or  less.    This   is  by  far  the  largest  category  of  vehicles. • Medium  Duty  Vehicles:    Are  used  in  a  variety  of  roles,  mostly  commercial,  and  are  typically   rated  between  8500  lbs.  and  14,000  lbs.  gross  vehicle  weight. • Heavy  Duty  Vehicles  and  Trucks:    Are  large  commercial  vehicles  rated  at  over  14,000  lbs.  gross   vehicle  weight. • Off-­‐Road:    This  term  refers  to  specialty  vehicles  that  are  not  intended  for  highway  use.    The   other  three  classifica.ons  all  represent  “on-­‐road”  vehicles  that  are  intended  to  travel  on   highways  and  streets  with  other  traffic.    Off-­‐road  vehicles  are  typically  special  commercial  and   industrial  vehicles  like  construc.on  or  mining  equipment.    They  are  regulated  separately  from   on-­‐road  vehicles. 2
  3. 3. In  addi.on  to  these  broad  classifica.ons  that  are  used  by  the  states  and  the  federal  government,  more  specific  classifica.ons  exist  within  these  broad  categories.    These  more  specific  classifica.ons  are  usually  based  on  engine  displacement  (size  or  capacity  of  the  cylinders)  and  engine  use.    For  example,  one  classifica.on  might  be  14  liter  and  larger  engines  for  heavy-­‐duty,  over-­‐the-­‐road  tractors  (typical  eighteen  wheel  tractor-­‐trailer  rig).    Natural  gas  vehicles  (NGV’s)  must  meet  and  adhere  to  regula.ons  and  standards  issued  or  used  by  the  federal  government,  na.onal  safety  bodies,  state  governments,  and  the  insurance  industry.    The  rules  vary  by  classifica.on.Federal  and  National  Regulations General  EPA  RegulationsThe  Environmental  Protec.on  Agency  (EPA)  became  the  chief  federal  regulatory  body  with  jurisdic.on  over  engine  technology  and  fuel  by  virtue  of  its  role  in  the  1973  Clean  Air  Act  (Act).    The  Act  established  the  EPA  as  the  expert  agency  to  regulate  vehicle  and  engine  emissions  for  the  purpose  of  reducing  pollutants  like  sulfur  dioxide,  nitrous  oxide  (NOx),  lead,  and  par.culate  maer.    In  1973,  the  EPA  established  goals  and  standards  for  a  list  of  pollutants  and  forced  the  automo.ve  industry  to  adopt  various  technologies  to  decrease  emissions.    Among  these  were  the  advent  of  unleaded  gasoline  and  the  mandatory  use  of  cataly.c  converters.    Since  1973,  the  EPA  has  modified  its  exis.ng  standards  and  added  new  ones  in  order  to  con.nually  decrease  emissions  of  harmful  substances,  making  its  automo.ve  emissions  regula.ons  arguably  the  most  stringent  in  the  world.    It  has  also  required  that  all  engine  and  air  quality  technology  on  vehicles  meet  its  emission  standards.    All  vehicle  engines  (and  other  internal  combus.on  engines)  are  governed  by  one  of  the  EPA’s  vehicle  regulatory  regimes  and  must  adhere  to  its  specific  set  of  regula.ons.    All  engines  in  general  public  or  commercial  use  must  be  cer.fied  to  meet  these  standards,  and  no  changes  to  those  engines  may  be  made  without  EPA  approval  and  cer.fica.on  to  meet  emission  standards.    Otherwise,  the  modifica.ons  are  deemed  to  be  “tampering”.    Tampered  vehicles  may  not  be  sold  or  used  legally  in  the  United  States.    All  vehicles  must  have  EPA  cer.fica.on  to  operate  or  be  sold.    In  1997,  the  EPA  altered  its  cer.fica.on  policies  to  specifically  address  alterna.ve  fuels  and  the  new  engine  technologies  that  they  created.    The  purpose  was  to  encourage  the  use  of  alterna.ve  fuels  in  vehicles  that  held  the  promise  of  further  emissions  reduc.ons.    This  was  par.cularly  important  at  that  .me  as  the  EPA  began  to  consider  the  effects  of  carbon  dioxide  emissions  on  global  warming,  based  on  the  United  Na.ons  climate  studies  which  had  just  been  published.    Included  in  the  group  of  alterna.ve  fuels,  along  with  ethanol,  bio-­‐diesel,  other  bio-­‐fuels,  and  propane,  was  natural  gas.    At  the  .me,  it  was  not  seen  as  a  par.cularly  viable  fuel,  and  there  were  no  specific  parameters  included  in  the  regula.ons  for  natural  gas  use  or  NGV’s.    All  fuels  essen.ally  followed  the  same  set  of  regula.ons.The  1997  regula.ons  spelled  out  a  cer.fica.on  process  for  alterna.ve  fuels.    They  reinforced  the  need  for  federal  approval  and  s.ll  prohibited  “tampering”  with  any  engine  to  alter  it  to  use  alterna.ve  fuels.    The  EPA  defined  tampering  as  any  modifica.on  or  altera.on  to  the  engine  that  might  change  its  performance,  behavior,  or  emissions  output  without  proper  EPA  cer.fica.on  or  verifica.on  that  this  was  not  the  case.    The  regula.ons  reiterated  prohibi.ons  against  tampering,  and  viola.ons  of  tampering   3
  4. 4. rules  can  result  in  substan.al  fines  and  other  penal.es.    Based  on  the  construc.on  of  the  regula.ons,  it  appears  that  any  par.cular  modifica.on  to  any  par.cular  engine  must  be  cer.fied  by  the  EPA  through  its  tes.ng  procedures  to  be  legal  for  use  on  roads  and  to  prevent  an.-­‐tampering  enforcement  ac.ons.    State  motor  vehicle  departments  were  charged  with  iden.fying  instances  of  tampering  through  their  vehicle  inspec.ons  processes.    Some  excep.ons  exist  to  these  regula.ons,  including  vehicles  and  engines  classified  for  “off-­‐road”  use,  which  were  not  intended  for  opera.on  on  highways.    By  defini.on,  any  type  of  conversion  to  natural  gas  use  on  an  exis.ng  engine  would  qualify  as  tampering,  if  the  conversion  were  not  cer.fied  for  that  par.cular  engine.    All  new  NGV’s  would  of  necessity  have  to  be  cer.fied  by  EPA  in  order  to  be  approved  for  sale  in  the  United  States,  and  cer.fied  by  CARB  in  states  that  adopted  CARB  emissions  regula.ons.The  cer.fica.on  requirements  consist  of  tes.ng  on  the  engine  or  altered  or  converted  engine  performed  by  a  laboratory  that  can  perform  all  or  some  of  the  required  exhaust  and  evapora.ve  emissions  tes.ng  required  by  the  EPA.    The  EPA  maintains  a  list  of  laboratories  that  can  perform  all  or  part  of  the  tes.ng,  but  does  not  endorse  or  approve  test  laboratories.    EPA  may  perform  confirmatory  tes.ng  at  its  own  expense.    Specific  tes.ng  procedures  depend  on  the  type  of  vehicle:    light  duty,  medium  duty,  heavy  duty,  off-­‐road,  etc.    In  general,  the  tes.ng  regimes  consist  of  specific  cycles  of  engine  loading  and  simultaneous  emissions  tes.ng.    For  on-­‐road  applica.ons,  the  tests  are  done  on  dynamometers  to  ensure  that  condi.ons  and  engine  loading  are  the  same  for  each  class  of  vehicles.    Hence,  emissions  from  vehicles  in  the  same  class  can  be  directly  compared  to  each  other  and  emission  standards  developed  for  that  class  as  a  whole.    Typically,  this  tes.ng  requires  over  1000  hours  of  dynamometer  tes.ng  as  reported  by  various  sources.    There  are  also  some  other  types  of  mechanical  and  chemical  tes.ng  that  are  incorporated  with  these  engine  loading  tests.    Thus,  cer.fica.on  requires  a  commitment  to  extensive  tes.ng.    Auto  and  engine  manufacturers  and  OEM’s  already  conform  to  this  system  with  each  new  product.In  2011,  the  EPA  announced  that  it  would  streamline  its  regula.ons  with  regard  to  alterna.ve  fuel  conversions  on  exis.ng  vehicles,  in  par.cular  for  natural  gas  vehicles.    Up  to  this  point,  the  EPA  had  allowed  for  cer.fica.on  of  these  conversions  or  modifica.ons,  but  treated  them  in  the  same  way  as  exis.ng  vehicles  and  engines.    The  EPA  did  not  adopt  any  guidelines  or  default  posi.ons  that  were  based  on  the  theore.cal  expecta.on  that  natural  gas  and  some  other  alterna.ves  were  generally  cleaner  burning  fuels  and  would  likely  produce  fewer  emissions  when  introduced  into  engines.    The  EPA  placed  the  burden  of  proof  on  the  manufacturers,  requiring  them  to  show  emissions  met  standards  in  the  engine  loading  test  regimes  for  each  class  of  vehicle.    This  made  the  process  cumbersome  and  resulted  in  few  conversions  or  new  engines  being  cer.fied  for  any  alterna.ve  fuel.    This  included  natural  gas,  despite  the  existence  and  history  of  opera.on  of  proven  technology.The  new,  streamlined  regula.ons  took  effect  in  2012.    The  primary  change  reported  was  to  classify  conversions  based  on  the  vehicle  age  and  apply  reduced  standards  for  cer.fica.on  to  older  vehicles.    The  age  based  categories  are: • New:    vehicles  which  are  less  than  two  years  old. • Intermediate:    vehicles  which  are  within  their  service  lives  but  more  than  two  years  old. 4
  5. 5. • Outside  Useful  Life:    vehicles  that  are  beyond  their  official  es.mated  service  lives.    Service  lives   are  reported  by  class  of  vehicle  and  engine  (light  duty  gasoline,  medium  duty  diesel,  etc.).     These  are  set  based  on  age  or  usage  (mileage  or  hours).    A  vehicle’s  service  life  is  typically   around  ten  years  at  average  use  for  the  class  (some  are  variously  reported  as  eight,  eleven,  or   twelve  years,  but  most  are  ten).    Thus,  to  use  the  streamlined  regula.ons  for  vehicles  of   moderate  age  (less  than  ten  years),  substan.ally  higher  use  than  average  for  the  class  is   required.The  purpose  of  this  regula.on  is  to  reduce  the  amount  of  repor.ng  and  cer.fica.on  tes.ng  that  is  required  to  avoid  tampering  prohibi.ons,  par.cularly  with  older  vehicles  that  may  have  increased  emissions  anyway  due  to  age  and  wear.    This  may  signal  that  the  EPA  is  willing  to  accept  the  premise  that  natural  gas  will,  in  most  cases,  reduce  emissions  of  currently  regulated  substances  and  carbon  dioxide,  and  should  become  the  general  expecta.on  when  incorpora.ng  natural  gas  as  a  fuel.    The  new  regulatory  structure  is: • New:    same  cer.fica.on  requirements  as  before. • Intermediate:    reduced  amount  of  tes.ng  for  cer.fica.on.    However,  this  reduc.on  has  not   been  set,  and  no  exact  set  of  tes.ng  regula.ons,  procedures,  or  standards  are  in  place.     Apparently,  the  EPA  is  reviewing  any  submissions  in  this  category  on  a  case-­‐by-­‐case  basis  (if  any   have  been  submied  at  this  point)  to  determine  what  will  be  required  for  cer.fica.on. • Outside  Useful  Life:    replacing  the  engine  tes.ng  regime  with  emissions  repor.ng  from  a   laboratory  or  operator  based  on  actual  vehicle  use.Although  the  new  regulatory  procedure  establishes  a  streamlined  method  of  cer.fying  conversions  for  older  vehicles,  the  EPA  has  not  yet  clarified  the  tes.ng  procedures  for  each  age  classifica.on  under  the  new  regula.ons.    It  appears  that  both  regulators  and  manufacturers  are  confused  as  to  what  must  be  done  to  actually  achieve  cer.fica.on  for  a  conversion  of  an  older  vehicle  engine  system.    By  the  middle  of  2012  only  a  few  new  conversions  or  engines  had  been  cer.fied.    However,  for  conversion  on  vehicles  beyond  their  useful  lives,  the  EPA  has  been  willing  to  grant  waivers  for  par.cular  conversions  and  applica.ons  with  a  minimum  of  repor.ng  and  tes.ng.    Obtaining  these  types  of  waivers  may  be  highly  dependent  upon  the  situa.on:    engine,  age,  applica.on,  installer,  etc. Other  Programs  and  Regulations  by  the  EPAAnother  category  to  which  different  standards  are  applied  is  vehicles  intended  for  Off-­‐Road  use.    These  are  primarily  vehicles  with  specialized  commercial,  industrial,  or  other  applica.ons,  for  example,  a  large  dump  truck  that  strictly  operates  in  a  quarry  or  open  pit  mine.    These  vehicles  and  engine  systems  are  evaluated  based  on  their  applica.on  or  use  profile.    Different  standards  for  emissions  apply  to  different  situa.ons,  but  most  must  s.ll  meet  some  regulatory  standards.  However  the  tes.ng  regimes  are  different  from  on-­‐road  vehicles.  This  afforded  the  EPA  the  ability  to  concentrate  its  regulatory  resources  on  classifica.ons  where  the  greatest  poten.al  for  improvement  lay.    Much  of  the  tes.ng  in  the  off-­‐road  category  is  done  through  repor.ng  from  independent  laboratories  or  the  operators.    Most  of  the  .me,  it  is  based  on  emissions  data  from  the  field.    The  Pennsylvania  Department  of  Environmental  Protec.on   5
  6. 6. (PADEP)  noted  that  standards  promulgated  for  non-­‐road  vehicles  and  engines  have  trailed  equivalent  standards  for  highway  vehicles  in  .me  by  about  four  years  because  the  popula.on  and  use  of  non-­‐road  engines  and  vehicles  is  less  than  highway  vehicles.    The  PADEP  also  noted  that  the  EPA  will  likely  require  non-­‐road  vehicles  and  engines  to  meet  cer.fica.on  standards  comparable  to  highway  vehicles  in  the  future.    In  terms  of  natural  gas  or  other  alterna.ve  fuel  conversions,  this  group  has  simpler  requirements.    To  cer.fy  a  conversion,  the  operator  or  manufacturer  must  submit  data  that  indicate  that  the  conversion  meets  the  applicable  standard  for  the  par.cular  off-­‐road  use  and  has  as  good  or  beer  emissions  profile  than  the  unconverted  system.    This  data  can  be  based  on  actual  use  or  specific  dynamometer  type  tes.ng.    The  EPA  states  a  preference  for  laboratory  gathered  results  over  self-­‐reported  ones,  but  is  open  to  accep.ng  either.    However,  the  regula.ons  imply  that  the  EPA  has  discre.on  in  accep.ng  or  rejec.ng  them  for  the  cer.fica.on.    The  EPA  would  also  seem  to  have  the  power  to  require  addi.onal  and  different  tes.ng  or  repor.ng  as  a  condi.on  of  cer.fica.on,  so  the  path  to  acceptance  of  off-­‐road  conversions  is  not  necessarily  clear.    No  sta.s.cs  were  reported  on  how  many  systems  have  been  approved  or  waivers  granted.Another  program  that  may  provide  a  pathway  to  cer.fica.on  or  acceptance  of  natural  gas  conversion  is  the  Na.onal  Clean  Diesel  Campaign  (NCDC).    The  purpose  of  this  program  is  to  reduce  the  pollutants  associated  with  light  to  heavy  diesel  engine  use.    The  program  covers  a  broad  spectrum  of  issues  rela.ng  to  diesel  use  on  the  highway,  off-­‐road,  and  in  other  areas  such  as  rail  locomo.ves.    It  includes  programs  and  projects  related  to  policy,  strategy,  use,  fuel,  and  other  technology.    Tradi.onal  pollutants  of  concern  with  diesel  use  such  as  par.culate  maer,  sulfur,  and  nitrogen  oxides  are  listed,  but  the  program  has  been  updated  to  also  include  greenhouse  gases.    Natural  gas  would  seem  to  fit  the  EPA  defini.on  for  “cleaner  burning  fuels”  by  reducing  most  of  these  emissions  when  used,  but  it  is  not  men.oned.    There  is  also  no  men.on  of  natural  gas  conversion  technology  in  the  EPA’s  SmartWay  Technology  Program  or  the  technology  sec.on  of  the  NCDC  website,  which  list  technological  developments  to  reduce  diesel  pollutants.    At  present  there  seem  to  be  no  reports  of  natural  gas  technology  being  accepted  or  cer.fied  under  this  program.    Other  alterna.ve  technologies  such  as  hybrids  have  been  reported,  so  this  program  may  provide  a  viable  means  of  introducing  natural  gas  conversions  into  the  diesel  market,  poten.ally  with  more  straight-­‐forward  regula.ons  or  ones  that  beer  fit  NGV’s.Another  area  where  introduc.on  might  be  possible  is  under  fuel  addi.ves.    The  EPA  does  not  regulate  to  any  great  degree  fuel  addi.ves  that  are  composed  solely  of  hydrogen  and  carbon.    Since  methane  (the  chief  component  of  natural  gas)  is  made  up  only  of  carbon  and  hydrogen,  it  would  seem  to  qualify  as  a  rela.vely  regula.on  free  fuel  addi.ve.    Hence,  some  Venturi  systems  for  natural  gas  delivery  to  engines  might  qualify.    However,  discussions  on  this  rule  seem  to  imply  that  there  is  a  limit  to  the  amount  of  fuel  addi.ve  that  can  be  introduced  before  it  is  considered  part  of  the  fuel  and  regulated  by  other  means.    There  is  also  no  discussion  as  to  whether  or  not  adding  systems  that  deliver  addi.ves  to  the  engine  cons.tutes  tampering. EPA  Testing  and  Costs 6
  7. 7. The  EPA  outlined  its  tes.ng  procedures  and  costs  or  amounts  that  were  recoverable  from  manufacturers  or  OEM’s  looking  to  cer.fy  systems  in  2006  (based  on  rule-­‐makings  in  2002  and  2004).    These  costs  are  described  in  detail  in  a  memorandum  in  the  Federal  Register  (available  at  69  Federal  Register  26222,  or  at  hp://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-­‐2004-­‐05-­‐11/pdf/04-­‐10338.pdf).    The  costs  are  based  on  the  type  of  engine  system  and  vehicle,  the  number  in  service,  and  other  factors.    Based  on  the  tables  in  the  above  referenced  Federal  Register  no.ce,  the  reported  costs  for  cer.fying  systems  range  from  $300,000  to  $3,000,000.    However,  various  reports  of  actual  costs  place  the  range  between  $200,000  and  $1,000,000.    These  are  s.ll  significant  costs  for  smaller  volume  applica.ons  of  engine  technology,  like  natural  gas  conversions.    While  a  Toyota  Camry’s  price  will  be  increased  only  a  few  dollars  per  vehicle  due  to  EPA  cer.fica.on  tes.ng,  the  same  tes.ng  might  add  $500  or  $1000  to  the  price  of  a  natural  gas  conversion  kit  with  the  poten.al  for  much  more  limited  sales.To  address  these  cost  issues,  the  EPA  does  allow  fuel  converters  to  aggregate  engine  families  or  OEM  test  groups  and  test  for  cer.fica.on  over  the  en.re  group.    However,  prior  EPA  evalua.on  and  approval  of  the  combina.on  is  required.    The  combina.ons  would  allow  the  same  tes.ng  to  be  applied  to  several  engine  systems  at  once,  reducing  cost.    The  EPA  does  place  a  number  of  condi.ons  on  these  combina.ons,  including: • They  are  similar  in  make  and  model  year. • Engine  displacements  are  rela.vely  close  (<15%  apart). • The  engine  configura.on,  design,  and  pistons  are  the  same. • The  use  classifica.on  is  the  same  (light  duty,  medium  duty,  etc.). • The  most  stringent  standards  of  any  part  of  the  group  are  met  by  all  components  of  the  group. • Combus.on  cycles  and  engine  controls  are  the  same. • They  all  have  the  same  method  of  air  aspira.on.The  restric.ons  are  described  in  detail  at:  hp://iaspub.epa.gov/otaqpub/display_file.jsp?docid=23319&flag=1  and  hp://iaspub.epa.gov/otaqpub/display_file.jsp?docid=23319&flag=1From  the  lis.ng  of  approved  natural  gas  conversions,  it  appears  that  this  has  been  done  in  only  a  few  cases. Other  National  Regulations  and  StandardsIn  addi.on  to  the  EPA  emissions  regula.ons,  several  other  na.onally  based  standards  apply  specifically  to  natural  gas  conversions.    All  converted  vehicles  must  s.ll  meet  all  safety  requirements  used  by  the  automo.ve  industry  and  na.onal  and  state  transporta.on  authori.es.    For  the  most  part,  natural  gas  conversions  do  not  affect  the  structural  integrity  or  crash-­‐worthiness  of  the  car,  so  the  bulk  of  these  regula.ons  pertain  to  the  vehicle  and  not  the  fuel  system.    There  should  be  no  problem  for  conversions  mee.ng  these  regula.ons  and  standards  if  the  original  vehicles  did  in  the  first  place. 7
  8. 8. There  are  a  few  regula.ons  and  standards  that  do  apply  specifically  to  natural  gas  conversions.    The  most  important  ones  are  the  standards  for  the  storage  tanks  or  pressure  vessels  that  hold  the  natural  gas.    Because  the  gas  is  under  pressure  and  is  flammable,  the  vessels  must  meet  accepted  safety  standards  in  these  areas.    The  two  most  important  are  ANSI  NGV2  and  FMVSS  304.    The  ANSI  NGV2  standard  ensures  the  safety  of  gas  cylinders  and  the  FMVSS  304  standard  is  used  by  OEM’s  to  ensure  that  their  components  meet  the  same  safety  standards  as  other  vehicle  components.    A  related  standard  is  ISO  11439,  which  is  a  more  comprehensive  standard  for  gas  cylinders.    Mee.ng  it  does  not,  however,  ensure  that  the  cylinders  can  be  used  in  vehicles.    NGV  conversions  should  meet  both  the  ANSI  NGV2  and  FMVSS  304  standards.In  addi.on  to  the  requirements  for  gas  cylinders,  conversion  systems  must  also  meet  the  NFPA-­‐52  standard.    This  standard  is  promulgated  by  the  Na3onal  Fire  Preven3on  Associa3on  (NFPA)  and  is  designed  to  ensure  that  vehicle  components  meet  an  appropriate  level  of  fire  safety.    NFPA  is  a  subsidiary  of  ANSI,  and  most  Society  of  Automo.ve  Engineers  (SAE)  cer.fied  mechanics  should  be  familiar  with  the  standard  and  how  it  is  met.    Much  of  this  regula.on  concerns  the  installa.on  of  the  conversion.    It  also  relates  to  basic  design  issues  that  contribute  to  fire  protec.on.Installa.on  is  also  a  regulatory  issue.    The  EPA  specifies  that  cer.fied  systems  must  also  have  cer.fied  installa.ons  in  order  to  be  valid.    In  prac.ce  there  is  no  system  run  by  the  EPA  to  ensure  installers  have  creden.als  for  cer.fica.on.    If  cer.fied  systems  have  been  installed  according  to  the  direc.ons  of  the  manufacturer,  they  are,  for  all  intents  and  purposes,  considered  properly  installed  and  not  tampering.    The  rules  governing  proper  installa.on  are  laid  out  by  the  SAE  and  the  OEM’s  and  other  manufacturing  organiza.ons.A  list  of  other  important  regula.ons  and  advisories  can  be  found  at:hp://www.nexgenfueling.com/t_codes.htmlSo  far,  manufacturers  offer  few  conversions  that  have  been  cer.fied  by  the  EPA  and  approved  for  use  in  on-­‐road  vehicles  within  their  useful  lives,  so  there  is  lile  data  on  how  these  other  regula.ons  have  been  met.    Up  to  this  point,  there  have  been  no  reports  of  widespread  failures  or  non-­‐compliance  with  automo.ve,  gas  storage,  or  fire  preven.on  standards.    Most  of  the  installa.ons  have  been  with  vehicles  classified  under  off-­‐road  use  or  beyond  their  useful  lives.    With  respect  to  these  vehicles,  lile  public  data  is  available  on  performance,  failure,  or  issues  of  compliance.    Private  data  likely  does  exist  but  is  difficult  to  find  or  not  widely  available.    Since  there  are  no  reports  of  widespread  failure  or  difficulty,  it  can  be  assumed  that  the  conversions  or  system  installa.ons  with  these  vehicles  has  been  largely  sa.sfactory.State  RegulationsSec.on  177  of  the  Clean  Air  Act  requires  that  states  adopt  one  of  two  emissions  regimes  for  new  cars:    the  federal  regula.ons  or  those  used  in  California  and  promulgated  by  CARB.    States  cannot  require   8
  9. 9. vehicles  to  meet  regula.ons  that  differ  from  the  federal  or  CARB  standards.    Thus,  the  California  regula.ons  are  of  par.cular  note. CARBThe  California  Air  Resource  Board,  or  CARB,  was  designated  as  the  state’s  agency  to  regulate  vehicle  emissions.    California  was  granted  a  waiver  by  the  EPA  to  develop  its  own  regula.ons,  as  long  as  they  met  certain  basic  standards  demanded  by  the  EPA.    California  was  eager  to  impose  regula.ons  on  a  quicker  .me  table  to  address  specific  issues  facing  the  state.    These  primarily  concerned  the  air  quality  and  smog  in  Southern  California  communi.es,  the  preserva.on  of  the  state’s  natural  resources,  and  the  preven.on  of  future  problems  in  other  metropolitan  areas.    Growth  and  significant  automobile  use  in  the  state  prompted  a  more  comprehensive  and  determined  approach  than  in  other  states  and  at  the  EPA,  where  Congressional  oversight  and  na.onal  priori.es  dictated  a  more  measured  approach.    Using  the  waiver,  California  produced  a  set  of  regula.ons  on  its  own  that  were  more  stringent  than  exis.ng  and  proposed  EPA  emissions  regula.ons.    As  a  result,  other  states  were  given  the  op.on  of  adop.ng  the  CARB  standards  or  the  EPA  standards  as  the  basis  for  their  emissions  regula.ons.    Fourteen  states,  including  Pennsylvania,  have  adopted  the  CARB  standards,  at  least  in  some  form.CARB  requires  cer.fica.on  of  vehicles  and  engine  systems  in  much  the  same  manner  as  the  EPA.    As  with  the  EPA,  there  are  excep.ons  for  off-­‐road  uses  and  applica.ons  that,  at  the  beginning  of  2012,  only  require  repor.ng  of  emissions  rather  than  a  formal  cer.fica.on  process.    CARB  also  requires  alterna.ve  fuel  conversions  to  follow  the  same  cer.fica.on  process  as  engines  and  related  technology.    The  CARB  regula.ons  have  not  been  streamlined,  so  there  are  no  limited  regulatory  or  cer.fica.on  regimes  based  on  the  age  of  the  vehicle  or  system.    Hence,  CARB  cer.fica.on  will  be  harder  to  achieve  in  some  circumstances  for  alterna.ve  fuel  conversions.The  costs  for  CARB  cer.fica.on  are  comparable  to  EPA  cer.fica.on,  if  somewhat  higher.    Generally,  mee.ng  the  CARB  standards  also  means  mee.ng  the  EPA  standards,  so  the  EPA  usually  accepts  CARB  cer.fica.on  as  a  basis  for  EPA  cer.fica.on.    This  is  part  of  the  working  agreement  between  EPA  and  California.    However,  there  appears  to  be  some  increase  in  cost  to  obtain  both  the  EPA  and  CARB  cer.fica.ons,  even  under  a  consolidated  tes.ng  regime.    Cost  reports  indicate  that  this  amounts  to  a  25%  to  35%  increase  in  cost.    This  means  that  full  cer.fica.on  costs  may  range  from  $300,000  to  $1,400,000  for  conversions  or  new  engines.    The  likely  reason  for  this  is  that  CARB  requires  aging  emissions  controls  for  the  life  of  the  vehicle,  which  would  add  to  tes.ng  and  development  costs. PennsylvaniaThe  Commonwealth  of  Pennsylvania  adopted  the  CARB  standards  in  2004  for  heavy  duty  trucks  (beginning  with  the  2005  model  year),  defined  as  vehicles  rated  at  over  14,000  lbs.  gross  vehicle  weight.    Passenger  cars  and  light  duty  trucks,  defined  as  vehicles  rated  below  8500  lbs.  gross  vehicle  weight,  were  brought  under  CARB  rules  in  2006  (beginning  with  the  2008  model  year).    Pennsylvania  does  list  a  number  of  excep.ons  to  the  CARB  standards,  based  on  off-­‐road  use,  emergency  vehicles,  military  vehicles,  and  other  special  circumstances,  which  are  iden.cal  to  exemp.ons  allowed  by  CARB.    In  short,  vehicles  rated  below  8500  lbs.  gross  vehicle  weight  or  above  14,000  lbs.  gross  vehicle  weight  must  meet  CARB  standards.    All  other  vehicles  must  meet  federal  emissions  standards  including  all  alterna.ve  fuel   9
  10. 10. conversions  and  related  modifica.ons.    In  Pennsylvania  CARB  standards  apply  to  new  vehicles.    Pennsylvania  defined  “new”  vehicles  as  those  with  less  than  7500  miles  on  the  odometer.    Vehicles  with  more  mileage  are  covered  under  EPA  regula.ons  instead.    The  regula.ons  regarding  Pennsylvania  emissions  are  found  in  Title  25  Chapter  126,  Subchapter  D  (light  duty  vehicles)  and  Subchapter  E  (heavy  duty  vehicles).Late  in  2011,  Pennsylvania  developed  a  policy  document  to  encourage  more  alterna.ve  fuel  conversions.    This  was  done  in  response  to  public  interest  in  natural  gas  vehicles,  prompted  by  par.cularly  low  local  pricing  for  natural  gas  as  a  result  of  the  Marcellus  Shale  explora.on  and  extrac.on.    In  addi.on,  Pennsylvania  did  not  adopt  13  CCR  (California  Code  of  Regula.ons)  §2030,  which  relates  to  aVermarket  conversion  systems  for  alterna.ve  fuels.    As  a  result,  PA  DEP  determined  that  aVermarket  natural  gas  conversion  kits  for  light  duty  trucks  and  cars  must  have  either  CARB  or  EPA  cer.fica.on.    Therefore,  a  vehicle  conversion  would  be  valid  if  it  was  cer.fied  at  EPA  and  not  by  CARB  or  vice  versa.    This  was  intended  to  open  the  market  to  more  conversion  kits  and  engine  technology  whose  manufacturers  may  not  have  had  the  funds  to  cer.fy  under  both  systems.    Heavy  duty  vehicles  operate  under  similar  regula.ons:    new  vehicles  require  CARB  systems  and  those  with  over  7500  miles  require  EPA  or  CARB.    For  medium  duty  vehicles,  there  are  presently  no  specific  regula.ons,  so  only  EPA  cer.fica.on  is  required.All  newly  .tled  heavy-­‐duty  and  light-­‐duty  vehicles  in  Pennsylvania  must  be  CARB  cer.fied,  so  new  natural  gas  vehicles  will  need  to  be  CARB  cer.fied.    This  probably  poses  few  problems,  since  new  natural  gas  vehicles  will  generally  come  from  OEM’s  that  must  cer.fy  the  vehicles  in  order  to  sell  them.    Conversion  kits  for  vehicles  with  over  7500  miles  may  be  either  CARB  or  EPA  cer.fied.    In  addi.on,  all  new  heavy-­‐duty  and  light-­‐duty  vehicles  .tled  in  Pennsylvania  must  have  CARB  cer.fica.on  for  their  engine  technology.    Cer.fica.on  is  required  for  new  vehicles  to  obtain  a  Pennsylvania  .tle  regardless  of  whether  or  not  they  were  previously  .tled  in  another  state.    This  also  applies  to  new  vehicles  that  have  been  converted  for  natural  gas  use;  they  must  obtain  a  new  .tle  and  meet  CARB  requirements.    While  emissions  regula.ons  are  handled  by  the  PA  DEP,  the  Pennsylvania  Department  of  Transporta.on  oversees  other  regula.ons  with  respect  to  motor  vehicles,  including  .tling  and  vehicle  safety  inspec.on.    Pennsylvania  does  not  typically  require  re-­‐.tling  for  vehicles  that  undergo  significant  engine  repair  or  change.    However,  alterna.ve  energy  conversions—including  those  for  natural  gas  systems—are  considered  significant  enough  so  as  to  cons.tute  a  re-­‐building  of  the  vehicle  and  require  a  new  .tle.    This  new  .tle  for  the  vehicle  is  referred  to  as  a  modified  .tle.    Owners  must  apply  for  permits  to  obtain  modified  .tles  (This  is  the  same  process  to  obtain  Reconstructed,  TheV,  and  other  types  of  specialty  .tles),  and  modified  .tle  vehicles  must  undergo  a  different  inspec.on  regime  than  regularly  .tled  vehicles.    Hence,  adherence  to  cer.fica.on  requirements  is  likely  to  be  more  of  an  issue  under  these  circumstances.    These  inspec.ons  must  also  be  done  at  inspec.ons  sta.ons  cer.fied  for  modified  vehicles,  and  only  a  frac.on  of  inspec.on  sta.ons  are  cer.fied.    New  vehicles  must  meet  CARB  standards,  and  older  vehicles  (as  previously  defined)  may  meet  EPA  or  CARB  standards  to  obtain  a  .tle.    There  are  no  reports  of  difficul.es  in  this  process  at  present,  but  issues  may  arise  as  more  conversions  are  made,  inspected,  and  .tled.    Pennsylvania  also  does  not  relax  .tling  requirements  with  age,  as  many  other  states  do,  so  most  PennDOT  .tling  regula.ons  will  fully  apply  to  any  vehicle  that  requires  one.     10
  11. 11. Titling  informa3on  is  available  at:hp://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdouorms/fact_sheets/Modified_Vehicle.pdf  andhp://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdouorms/mv_forms/mv-­‐426B.pdfThe  EPA  enforces  an.-­‐tampering  regula.ons,  but  states  are  responsible  for  enforcing  .tling  requirements,  including  CARB  cer.fica.on  and  obtaining  modified  .tles  for  converted  vehicles,  as  well  as  other  state  regula.ons  such  as  safety  and  emissions  inspec.ons.  States  have  tended  to  focus  on  required  individual  emissions  tes.ng  and  other  safety  inspec.on  issues.    For  the  most  part,  states  have  not  rigorously  checked  engine  modifica.ons  of  any  kind  against  EPA  and  CARB  cer.fica.ons.    Because  of  this,  uncer.fied  conversions  have  been  made  and  are  in  use  throughout  the  country.    Based  on  the  number  of  cer.fied  systems,  the  percentage  of  uncer.fied  conversions  is  probably  rela.vely  high.    Part  of  this  is  due  to  the  rarity  of  these  conversions,  par.cularly  with  respect  to  other  inspec.on  issues.    However,  as  natural  gas  and  other  alterna.ve  conversions  gain  popularity,  there  will  be  more  opportunity  for  enforcement,  and  it  will  become  a  more  significant  enforcement  issue.    With  media  and  public  aen.on  on  these  conversions,  some  states  have  already  issued  leers  and  memoranda  clarifying  their  posi.ons  and  direc.ng  enforcement  officers  to  obtain  cer.fica.on  documenta.on  on  conversions  and  altera.ons.    This  includes  Pennsylvania.    Therefore,  cer.fica.on  will  become  much  more  important  in  the  near  future.Insurance  RegulationIn  addi.on  to  the  public  regula.on,  there  will  likely  be  some  private  regula.on  of  natural  gas  vehicles,  primarily  from  the  insurance  industry.    In  order  for  operators  to  use  natural  gas  vehicles,  especially  for  on-­‐road  use,  there  must  be  some  means  of  insuring  them  against  loss.    The  insurability  of  natural  gas  vehicles  depends  upon  the  risks  associated  with  their  use.    If  there  are  too  many  risks,  the  premiums  must  be  set  very  high  (if  at  all),  which  will  make  the  cost  of  opera.ng  a  natural  gas  vehicle  prohibi.ve.    At  present  there  is  very  lile  loss  data  available  for  natural  gas  vehicles.    Most  that  are  used  exist  in  fleets  in  limited  use.    As  a  consequence,  insurance  companies  will  have  to  make  es.mates  of  poten.al  risks  and  losses  in  order  to  assign  premiums.    At  this  .me,  few  if  any  insurance  companies  have  official  posi.ons  on  natural  gas  vehicles,  other  than  that  they  must  fall  within  the  normal  governing  regula.ons  on  safety,  emissions,  and  other  aspects  of  opera.on  (EPA,  DOT,  State,  and  other  applicable  laws  and  regula.ons).    It  is  likely  that  vehicle  conversions  that  are  not  cer.fied  under  the  EPA  and  CARB  are  not  insurable.    Likewise,  an  insurance  company  would  almost  certainly  require  that  other  standards  like  ANSI  NGV2  and  NFPA  52  be  met  to  make  an  NGV  insurable.    Beyond  that  and  absent  other  data  on  losses,  most  insurance  companies  would  rate  a  converted  vehicle  in  the  same  way  as  the  un-­‐converted  or  tradi.onal  fuel  (gasoline  or  diesel)  vehicle.    Some  may  not  wish  to  rate  or  insure  the  vehicles  at  all,  ci.ng  the  unknown  risks  associated  with  the  technology  as  far  as  losses  and  safety  concerns.    Since  most  natural  gas  vehicles  in  use  are  presently  part  of  fleets,  they  are  most  likely  insured  by  commercial  insurers.    These  insurers  typically  use  different  parameters  to  assess  risk  than  retail  insurers  and  can  be  more  flexible  in  the  types  of  assets  they  insure,   11
  12. 12. their  ra.ng  procedures,  and  risk  management.    Other  natural  gas  vehicles  are  classified  as  off-­‐road  use  and  would  be  insured  under  different  ra.ng  structures  that  primarily  take  into  account  the  special  circumstances  of  their  use,  or  they  might  not  be  insured  at  all.On  the  other  hand,  insurance  companies  are  able  to  respond  much  more  quickly  to  changes  in  informa.on  than  regulatory  bodies,  which  require  some  level  of  consensus.    Insurance  companies  may  react  quickly  to  new  data  on  losses  and  change  ra.ngs  posi.vely  or  nega.vely  as  experience  demonstrates.    An  example  of  this  in  the  alterna.ve  vehicle  market  is  the  ra.ng  structures  for  hybrids  and  electric  cars,  which  are  currently  in  a  state  of  flux.    When  they  were  introduced,  these  cars  received  comparable  ra.ngs  to  other  cars  of  their  size.    As  .me  went  by,  and  insurers  gained  accident  and  use  data  on  these  cars,  and  new  risks  were  iden.fied  which  must  now  be  included  in  their  ra.ngs.    The  baeries  in  hybrids  and  electric  cars  were  prone  to  damage  in  certain  types  of  accidents.    Once  damaged  the  baeries  had  to  be  replaced—which  turned  out  to  be  an  expensive  proposi.on.    As  a  result,  a  higher  propor.on  of  these  vehicles  are  totaled  aVer  accidents  than  comparable  cars  with  only  internal  combus.on  engines.    Damaged  baeries  can  produce  and  leak  hydrogen  gas,  which  can  cause  fires  in  the  vehicles  and  damage  adjacent  property.    Insurers  are  now  trying  to  include  the  cost  of  these  extra  losses  in  the  premiums  for  these  types  of  cars.    The  same  may  ul.mately  be  true  for  natural  gas  vehicles.    Therefore,  it  is  possible  that  natural  gas  vehicle  ra.ngs  could  change  drama.cally  once  experience  with  them  has  iden.fied  all  of  the  risks,  and  operators  must  be  aware  of  this  possibility.ConclusionsThe  combina.on  of  EPA  and  CARB  regula.on  presents  OEM’s  and  manufacturers  of  natural  gas  engine  and  vehicle  technology  with  a  confusing  and  daun.ng  set  of  obstacles.    To  date,  only  a  few  natural  gas  solu.ons  have  been  approved  under  EPA  or  CARB  regula.ons  for  use  in  on-­‐road  circumstances.    Those  that  have  are  typically  the  more  popular  engines  makes  and  models  that  will  achieve  the  largest  market  penetra.ons.    Helping  to  drive  this  concentra.on  is  the  fact  that  most  natural  gas  vehicles,  new  or  converted,  are  part  of  vehicle  fleets,  which  are  usually  comprised  of  more  popular  makes  and  models.    Despite  the  small  number  of  approved  solu.ons,  there  are  a  fairly  large  number  of  manufacturers  making  products.    Most  adver.se  that  they  are  only  intended  for  off-­‐road  applica.ons  in  the  U.S.,  a  less  burdensome  alterna.ve  to  on-­‐road  cer.fica.on.    Many  are  also  installed,  par.cularly  with  heavier  duty  applica.ons,  on  vehicles  that  are  beyond  their  normal  service  lives,  for  which  waivers  from  cer.fica.on  are  easily  obtained.    For  most  of  the  manufacturing  companies,  the  bulk  of  their  sales  come  from  foreign  countries,  where  cer.fica.on  and  approval  regula.ons  are  typically  less  intensive,  depending  on  the  exact  country.    The  cost  and  complexity  of  cer.fica.on  will  likely  prevent  many  new  entrants  over  the  next  few  years,  as  manufacturers  concentrate  on  the  popular  models  and  niche  applica.ons.    This  situa.on  is  analogous  to  drug  regula.on,  where  drug  makers  concentrated  on  widespread  illnesses  and  afflic.ons  like  diabetes  and  ignored  diseases  with  smaller  popula.ons  because  the  chances  of  recouping  the  development  and  regulatory  costs  at  reasonable  sale  prices  were  much  beer  with  larger  markets.    The  bulk  of  the  market  in  the  U.S.  will  likely  be  with  conversions  of  older  vehicles  that  are  beyond  their  service  lives,  since  there  is  less  scru.ny  and  an  easier  regulatory  framework. 12
  13. 13. It  is  unlikely  that  this  situa.on  will  change  in  the  next  several  years.    The  current  year,  2012,  is  a  na.onal  elec.on  year  and  features  what  will  probably  be  two  widely  different  approaches  to  regula.ng  natural  gas  vehicles.    With  this  uncertainty,  it  is  unlikely  that  the  EPA  and  other  government  agencies  will  embark  on  any  substan.al  changes  in  policy  regarding  a  charged  topic  like  energy  use  and  consump.on.    The  regula.ons  will  probably  remain  the  same,  and  the  new  streamlined  versions  will  probably  not  be  clarified  un.l  2013  or  2014.    Furthermore,  should  the  elec.on  yield  a  President  and  Congressional  majori.es  more  sympathe.c  to  natural  gas  vehicle  use,  there  will  s.ll  undoubtedly  be  other  issues  of  higher  priority  to  address  in  2013,  puwng  off  any  reform  of  natural  gas  vehicle  technology  cer.fica.on  un.l  the  end  of  2013  or  2014.    Another  risk  is  that  regula.ons  could  become  more  stringent,  depending  on  poli.cal  direc.ons.    The  EPA  could  expand  the  number  of  compounds  that  it  currently  regulates  for  vehicle  emissions.    Of  par.cular  interest  to  companies  manufacturing  or  contempla.ng  using  NGV’s  is  unburned  methane.    Methane  is  a  potent  greenhouse  gas  and,  therefore,  may  become  a  target  of  regula.on.    Natural  gas  fuel  systems  and  engines  may  have  to  cer.fy  that  they  do  not  emit  significant  amounts  of  methane  from  opera.on.    These  facts  will  require  that  most  manufacturers  with  natural  gas  technology  work  with  an  OEM  or  strategic  partner  familiar  with  the  EPA  and  CARB  processes  for  engine  technology  or  remain  focused  on  off-­‐road  and  older  vehicles  for  conversion.    One  poten.al  bright  spot  is  that  industry  and  insurance  regula.on  may  quickly  adapt  to  this  market  and  set  the  standard  for  installa.ons.    Since  the  regula.ons  are  confusing  both  for  those  following  them  and  enforcing  them,  industrial  prac.ces  and  insurance  underwri.ng  may  begin  to  gain  weight  as  standards  and  influence  the  regulatory  interpreta.ons,  providing  an  organic  means  of  developing  a  posi.ve  regulatory  framework  to  develop  the  market  opportunity.The  regulatory  factors  discussed  above  will  slow  and  probably  cap  the  penetra.on  of  natural  gas  solu.ons  in  transporta.on.    The  requirements  of  the  cer.fica.on  process  mean  that  most  manufacturers  will  sell  to  off-­‐road  niche  markets  in  the  U.S.  or  manufacture  for  fleets  and  popular  vehicle  types  while  pursuing  foreign  sales  in  La.n  America,  Poland,  and  other  places  that  are  developing  shale  gas  resources.    The  regula.ons  also  place  a  bias  on  new  vehicles  that  must  be  qualified  regardless  of  fuel  type.    This  will  favor  OEM’s  who  will  manufacture  natural  gas  vehicles  for  fleet  applica.ons  at  the  expense  of  conver.ng  exis.ng  vehicles  and  fleets.    For  the  near  future,  natural  gas  vehicles  will  remain  a  small  part  of  the  market  but  an  expanding  one,  despite  the  cost  savings  and  other  benefits  rela.ve  to  diesel  fuel  and  gasoline.    However,  if  this  limited  use  produces  savings,  beer  emissions,  and  the  poten.al  for  beer  energy  security,  public  pressure  will  likely  force  policy  to  more  readily  accommodate  natural  gas  vehicles,  and  more  op.ons  will  become  available.    This  will  allow  natural  gas  vehicles  to  expand  into  all  of  the  markets  where  their  use  makes  sense.Paper  Authored  by:The  Shale  Gas  Innova.on  &  Commercializa.on  Center  (www.sgicc.org)  Mr.  Brian  Krier,  Energy  Programs  Manager,  Ben  Franklin  Technology  Partners  of  Central  and  N.  PA  (CNP) 13
  14. 14. 115  Technology  Center  BuildingUniversity  Park,  PA  16802For  ques.ons,  contact  Bill  Hall,  SGICC  Director  at  either  814-­‐933-­‐8203  or  billhall@psu.edu  ReferencesEPA  regula.ons  on  alterna.ve  fuel  conversions:    hp://epa.gov/otaq/consumer/fuels/aluuels/aluuels.htmNa.onal  Clean  Diesel  Campaign:    hp://epa.gov/cleandiesel/index.htmEPA  Guidance  to  fuel  converters:    hp://iaspub.epa.gov/otaqpub/display_file.jsp?docid=23319&flag=1EPA  Vehicle  Fuel  Emissions  Lab:    hp://ofmpub.epa.gov/otaqpub/display_file.jsp?docid=26974&flag=1Loca.on  of  Regula.ons  in  the  U.S.  Code:    42  USC  Sec  7522  (a)(3)Natural  Gas  Vehicles  for  America  Trade  Group:    www.ngcv.orgConversion  Kit  Resource:    www.skycng.comCalifornia  Regula.ons:    www.arb.ca.govPennsylvania  Clean  Vehicles  Program:    hp://www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/deputate/airwaste/aq/cars/cleanvehicles.htmPennsylvania  Portal  for  Natural  Gas  Vehicles:    hp://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/act_13/20789/natural_gas_vehicle_program/1157504 14

×