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Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images
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Analyzing social media networks with NodeXL - Chapter- 08 images

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  • 1. 1Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved Chapter 8 Email: The Lifeblood of Modern Communication Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL Insights from a Connected World
  • 2. 2Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.1 Chapter8 A simple email network visualized in NodeXL. Arrows point from the sender to the receiver(s). Edge thickness (1 to 3) is based on number of messages exchanged. Edge opacity is set to 50. Vertex size (1.5 to 5) is based on out- degree or number of messages sent.
  • 3. 3Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.2 Chapter8 Window’s search results show all 2174 email messages and the folder they are contained in on the desktop containing the search term “NodeXL.”
  • 4. 4Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.3 Chapter8 NodeXL Import from Email Network dialog filtered to only include messages with the term “NodeXL” between 1/1/2009 and 5/31/2009 in a specified folder.
  • 5. 5Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.4 Chapter8 Excel 2007 Find and Replace function used to merge different email addresses in a NodeXL Edges worksheet.
  • 6. 6Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.5 Chapter8 A Lookup table and the Excel VLOOKUP() formula is used to combine duplicate email addresses in NodeXL.
  • 7. 7Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.6 Chapter8 Effects of NodeXL’s Merge Duplicate Edges feature after combining duplicate addresses. A self-loop is shown in red.
  • 8. 8Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.7 Chapter8 Derek Hansen’s email network for May 2009, showing only connections with over five messages (Edge Visibility > 4). Size is based on the Log of total sent messages (1.5 to 3.5). Opacity is based on the Log of total received messages (30 to 100). Edge weight is mapped to Edge Width (1 to 4) and log of edge weight is mapped to Edge Opacity (10 to 70). Shape is set to Label for email lists; Ben Shneiderman and Marc Smith are labeled with the Shape kept as a Disk.
  • 9. 9Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.8 Chapter8 NodeXL visualization of Derek’s personal email message network limited to messages with the term “NodeXL” sent or received over a 5-month period; shown before and after the application of dynamic filters. Size maps to the Log of total sent messages, Opacity maps to the Log of total received messages. Edge width and opacity map to edge weight.
  • 10. 10Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.9 Chapter8 TechABC’s organizational unit email network “backbone,” focusing on high-traffic connections between units (i.e., those who exchange more than 50 messages per FTE). Color is mapped to betweenness centrality with green vertices playing important roles as bridge spanners. Edge opacity is mapped to messages per FTE. Dynamic filters were used to exclude those with low closeness centrality, which is a trick for filtering out all vertices that are not part of the large component.
  • 11. 11Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.10 Chapter8 TechABC’s organizational unit network including research units (maroon squares) and nonresearch units connected to them (blue disks) through the exchange of email. Only edges with 10 or more messages sent per FTE are included. Edge width (1-2) and opacity (40-100) are based on raw sent messages. Vertex size is based on the number of group members (FTEs). Notice some obvious disconnects (e.g., Market Research 1 and 2), as well as some of the important bridge spanning research groups (e.g., Specific 6) and nonresearch groups (e.g., Blue disk just above General 17).
  • 12. 12Copyright © 2011, Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved FIGURE 8.11 Chapter8 Enron Corporation’ s network of email including messages with the word “FERC” exchanged between employees. Vertex size (1.5 to 4) is based on indegree. Greener vertices received many FERC messages but did not send many out. The Harel-Karen layout was initially used, followed by Fruchterman-Reingold, to push the more peripheral vertices to the edges. Tim Belden, who pleaded guilty and witnessed against other top Enron executives, is labeled.

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