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  • Make something beautiful and compelling (i.e. invest heavily in content)\n\nPay for seeding\n\nStagger seeding across multiple channels to reach incremental audience\n
  • We all prefer to hang around with people like ourselves -- that's homophily. You instinctively prefer the company of people who share your values and beliefs and preferences.\n\n\n\n# If more than 1.89% of your Facebook friends are gay... then you probably are too\n# Jernigan, Carter, Mistree, Behram. "Gaydar: Facebook friendships expose sexual orientation" First Monday [Online], Volume 14 Number 10 (25 September 2009) http://bit.ly/8YTy2X\n# Photo: William Murphy http://www.fotopedia.com/users/infomatique (CC Attrib/Sharealike)\n
  • And conversely, a lot of our decisions are based on unconsciously copying our friends, their values, beliefs and behaviours.\n\nThis self-reinforcing behaviour is very important for advertisers.\n\n\n\n# 171% increased risk of obesity if your close friend is obese\n# ‘The Spread of Obesity in a Large Social Network over 32 Years’: Christakis & Fowler, (New England Journal of Medicine, July 26 2007) http://bit.ly/9TcH3W\n
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Shareable content copy Shareable content copy Presentation Transcript

  • Shareable ContentSocial Media 101
  • Most content will never go viral.
  • Big Seed.
  • we like to make friends withHomophily people who share our values
  • we unconsciously copy ourSocial Proof friends
  • Maslow Hierarchy of Needs
  • Clip Art clichés reveal the truth
  • Good ways to think Social media cues define content Reward sharing Make it about them
  • Social media cues define content
  • Not just lifting content...
  • Big niche meme-hooking
  • CDC Zombies
  • Toyota Leeroy Jenkins
  • Will it Blend? Chuck Norris Facts
  • Search and Social Why the iPhone 5 was a thingdemand lead content
  • Clicks on @HuffingtonPost, 2011-09-05 iPhone 5 Twitter Pixar iPad Amazon Teachers Cheney Astronomy Rick Perry Mubarak 0 1750 3500 5250 7000Social feedback determines editorial placement
  • Without just copying... Most of these examples were powered by Facebook. None of them required that the user became a Fan. All of them encouraged sharing. Today with Sponsored Stories, these “Platform” products have become even more compelling.
  • Reward sharing
  • Extrinsic value is always the worst option
  • Innovative Thunder:Pay with a Tweet (2010) Where we used to offer content or value in return for an email address or a like… …we should now ask for a share or endorsement to the users’ social networks.
  • ASOS: Exclusive SalePreview (June 2011) ASOS created a virtual queue to enter their online Summer Sale. Queue positions had real value: the first in would get the widest choice of sale products. Users could jump places in the queue by recruiting their friends. With 27K fans joining the queue on day 1, ASOS went on to generate over 500K clicks and 166K new fans (ASOS can convert fans into traffic and sales.)
  • Volkswagen Brazil: PlanetaTerra / Twitter Zoom (2010)• Volkswagen supported their sponsorship of the Planeta Terra music festival by hiding tickets to the event around Sao Paolo.• The locations of the tickets were marked on a Google Map- powered competition site. The more tweets that contained the hashtag #foxatplanetaterra, the more the map zoomed in to reveal the hiding places.• #foxatplanetaterra trended for four days.
  • False scarcity creates value
  • Reward sharing Avoid one-to-one thinking Find (or create) scarcity value Avoid extrinsic value Switch from market norms to social norms Target psychic value
  • Make it about them, not you
  • a few seconds offame.
  • Face in the game
  • My few seconds of fame
  • Intel: Museum of Me(May 2011)• People are more likely to share things that are about them. A simple way to do this is to “put their face in the game”.• Intel created a technically beautiful visualisation of users’ Facebook photos and friends.• Users can share photos to their Facebook Wall.• 1 million visits in 5 days. No media support.
  • Desperados(April 2011)• Desperados YouTube channel takeover lets users connect with Facebook to see a personalised version of the video.• Users can share photos and invitations to the experience with their social graph.
  • Nike: We Run Paris(October 2011)• RFID shoe tags are linked to Facebook; runners’ times are shared to their Facebook time line as they pass the 5K mark.• Facebook is used to share rankings, and to download and share Nike-branded photos of each runner crossing the finishing line.
  • Gamification. Handle with care.
  • Make it about them, not you All of these examples were powered by Facebook. None of them required that the user became a Fan. All of them encouraged sharing. Today with Sponsored Stories, these “Platform” products have become even more compelling.