Design Research Report - Locopilot ergonomic study

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Design Research Report - Locopilot ergonomic study

  1. 1. Contents 1 Indian Railways ......................................................................................................................................... 4 2 Objective .................................................................................................................................................. 5 3 Proposed Outcome .................................................................................................................................. 5 4 About Loco pilots ..................................................................................................................................... 6 4.1 5 Understanding: ......................................................................................................................................... 7 5.1 6 Loco cabin Operation and Dashboard .............................................................................................. 7 User Study: ............................................................................................................................................... 9 6.1 7 Assistant loco pilots .......................................................................................................................... 6 Operator - Ramesh ........................................................................................................................ 10 Health Concerns due to improper working conditions .......................................................................... 10 7.1 Fatigue ............................................................................................................................................ 10 7.2 Sound Pollution .............................................................................................................................. 10 7.3 Temperature and Pollution ............................................................................................................ 11 8 DASHBOARD COMPONENTS .................................................................................................................. 13 1 VISIBILITY SITTING .................................................................................................................................. 14 2 FROM SEAT ............................................................................................................................................. 14 8.1 9 Difference between Diesel and Electric Engine in terms of Ergonomic Factors ............................ 15 USERSTUDY ANALYSIS AND RESULTS ..................................................................................................... 16 9.1 Very High Temperature: ................................................................................................................. 16 9.2 Sound Pollution: ............................................................................................................................. 16 9.2.1 Seats: ......................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 9.3 Accessibility of operational controls .............................................................................................. 16 9.4 Visibility .......................................................................................................................................... 16 9.5 Interpretation of signal. ................................................................................................................. 17 9.6 Coherence of warning systems ...................................................................................................... 17 9.7 Poor Feedback on operations/actions ........................................................................................... 18 9.8 Gears & Knobs ................................................................................................................................ 18 9.9 Knobs Detached ............................................................................................................................. 18 9.10 Changing Interfaces ........................................................................................................................ 18 9.11 Unclean working environment ....................................................................................................... 19 9.12 Parallax Error .................................................................................................................................. 19 9.13 Inadequate provisions for placing items ........................................................................................ 20 9.14 No basic amenities ......................................................................................................................... 21
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION 1 Indian Railways Indian Railways are the largest rail network in Asia and the world's second largest under one management. Criss-crossing the country's vast geographical spread, Indian Railways are a multigauge, multi-traction system covering over 1 lakh track kilometres,300 yards, 2300 goodsheds and 700 repair shops. Its rolling stock fleet includes 8300 locomotives, 39,000 coaching vehicles and 3.5 lakh freight wagons. Its work force is 1.65 million and it runs some 11,000 trains everyday, including 7,000 passenger trains. Freight traffic on Indian Railways has registered an impressive growth in the last four decades. Increase in the last few years have been particularly striking. From a mere 93 million tonnes of originating freight traffic in 1950-51, Railways carried nearly 376 million tonnes in 1992-93, an increase of 304%. This has been despite the ever increasing pressure of passenger traffic which increased during the same period from 1.28 billion passengers carried to 4.2 billion to make an Indian Railways (IR) a leading passenger carrying railway in the world. Over the years, Railways have built up an elaborate and well established manual information system to help them monitoring their moving assets. Supported by a dedicated voice communications network, it collects and transmits information from the remotest corners of the country to control centers, at the highest level. The size and complexity of their operations, growing traffic and changing technologies, placed inevitably a heavy burden on this manual information system. Need for its modernization was therefore felt for sometime. Indian Railways is the state-owned railway company of India, which owns and operates most of the country's rail transport. It is overseen by the Ministry of Railways of the Government of India. Indian Railways has more than 64,015 kilometres of track and 7,083 stations. It has the world's fourth largest railway network after those of the United States, Russia and China. Indian railways uses a number of different Diesel and Electric locomotives, Steam locomotives were once very common but are now only used on heritage routes Indian railways uses four gauges, the 1,676mm broad gauge which is wider than the 1,435mm standard gauge; the 1,000mm metre gauge; and two narrow gauges, 762 mm and 610 mm . Track sections are rated for speeds ranging from 75 to 160 km/h. Many railway stations are in gross disrepair, dirty, outdated and overcrowded, especially when compared to stations in developed countries. Sometimes passengers are seen on trains hanging out windows and even on the roof creating safety problems.[43] The interior of many train compartments are poorly maintained from rust, dirt and common wear and tear. As, Railway network is the most preferable and one of the cheapest form of transport affordable by most of the classes in the society, there is huge demand for designing an ergonomically efficient and fool proof system which includes safety in terms signal interpretation, operations and the working conditions of the Locomotives.
  3. 3. 2 Objective To study the Railway Locomotive Engine Cabin, from an ergonomics point of view, in relation to the Dashboard and Operations of the Loco-pilot and to analyze and identify the scope for design and propose solutions 3 Proposed Outcome To propose an ergonomically efficient design for Dashboard based on the current operational issues faced by the Loco-pilots in Indian Context. A dashboard design in relation to the signal reception, understanding, distance indication, comfort and efficient in operation and performance.
  4. 4. An Ergonomic study on Working conditions of Loco Pilots This study is aimed at understanding and analyzing the current scenario of railway engine operation in the cabin, to identify the various challenges involved and the cognitive behavior of drivers while performing their daily operations and provide design solutions. 4 About Loco pilots • Operation of Railway engine is more than mere riding. One has to know to read, remember and interpret all kinds of signals with high level concentration and alertness. • They are usually trained for 6 months to a year in signal interpretation and engine operation. And later they have an exam for evaluation of our capabilities. • They usually work for 8-13 hrs. They work in alternate shifts. They usually rest in the running room which is present in all the major junctions. • The teaching techniques which are being used in imparting railway rules and operations is the same which that are coined by the British. 82 amendments have been made so far. 4.1 ASSISTANT LOCO PILOTS Duties to perform • The assistant driver has to convey signal to the pilot. • He has to operate the horn • He has to put his head out at curves because the visibility is very less at curves. This results in chronic neck pain. • As the dashboard is placed behind the assistant loco pilot they have to twist their body quite often to perform their duties. In AC engines they have to perform checks of the engine parameters every one hour. • This involves walking through the generator section inside the engine • • He is exposed to: Loud noise produced by the generator High temperature of the engine every one hour • And comes in contact fumes & grime
  5. 5. In case of any faults in the engine operation, charge apply equally on Loco pilot and Assistant loco pilots. 5 Understanding: 5.1 LOCO CABIN OPERATION AND DASHBOARD • • • • • • • • • • • Diesel and electric engines are major types of engines in use. Basic operations include checking the brake power, oil level , sharp look out wile on run & must observe all permanent & temporary speed restrictions Direct view is not mandatory to be able to drive the locos; side view is mostly used to capture the signals. They just read the signals for which they need to bend a bit. Based on the signals given by the Central Signal Unit which is present in every major junction they operate the engine. The entire conversation with the Signal Unit happens over a Walkie Talkie. In case of urgency they use our mobiles. Mostly mobile conversation is prohibited while operating the Loco. The Walkie Talkie operates within 3-4 km reach of the arriving/departed station. After they rely only on the signals. While running the engine in the curves especially when the signals are located on the curves, they have to bend and see. Otherwise they are visible from the seated position. Mechanical Failures could be due to break down of the cooling system, lack of lubrication. It is a fool proof safe signal network; failure could be only due to human errors. In case of natural calamities they would stop the engine few km prior to the location of disaster as they would continuous workers to monitor the condition of the track, the climatic condition and inform the nearest station from where they would be getting the signal. In case they are unable to get any signals, say they are no stations nearby the track monitors would explode dynamite whole vibrations could be detected by the loco when its few km away. In that way they could prevent any severe damage. There is a digital setup which records the all the actions during a particular journey. The Loco pilots have to just fill in their profile details and the engine operations will be automatically recorded. Sand is being continuously filled in every station so that incase of rains or slippery surfaces, pouring sand on the tracks gives friction thereby reducing slippage. Pole signal operation
  6. 6. Signal communication box in case of emergencies when communication through Walkie Talkie is not possible Arrow pointing refers to this track • Station to station signal operation – say a train is leaving from station A to Station B, It has successfully reached the station B and got a clear signal from the station master and has left station B and is heading towards Station C. In between station B and C somewhere in between 20 km away, if there is a failure of the engine, the loco would be stopped. One can use a mobile or a walkie talkie to communicate this to the Signal Unit. In case of absence of network, the loco pilot or his assistant has to stop the train there and go to the nearest signal pole where there is a communication network box through which they could send the signal indicating the failure. Later the Signal Unit would receive this message and locate the train using GPS and would do the required repair. A new train would start from station B only when the old train which left from station B has successfully reached station C. No two trains can go in the same track within small time difference. 10 km Station A Signal regarding failure sent 2 km Station C Station B Failure Pole Signal regarding failure reached C
  7. 7. 6 User Study: Conducted at Bangalore Central, South Western Railways. Supervisors Training Center, Bangalore. Yeswanthpur Railway station, Bangalore. Operator – T. Venkatesh • Has 23 years of experience and has operated both diesel and electric engines. • A basic graduation or diploma or ITI is required prior to the training given in railways for Loco operation. • There is absolutely no room for entertainment, 365 days of work, the shifts keep on changing every day. In case of leave we have to apply months before. Its not easy to get leave when there are emergencies. • There are no toilets, water, food readily available when its required as a result of which we have ulcers and piles. • No emotional strings attached, irrespective of whatever their state of mind we have to give full concentration and attention to work. Even in case of inevitable accidents we have to be strong. We are subjected to psychometric tests during trainings. • Working atmosphere is a permanent deficiency. We are subjected to high temperature and sounds. The sound we are subjected to is 80% higher than the normal hearing. There is pupil dilation due to stress and varying light conditions. • Also we are continuously working in vibrating environment which is subjected to magnetic flux for 5-6 hours, this could result in memory loss. • The cushioning and suspension is not so comfortable, also bending and leaning to read signals has resulted in spinal chord related issues. • Smoke and dust also causes nuisance. Sitting for long hours has resulted in knee pain • There are 8 kinds of diesel engines and 8 kinds of electric engines. Most of us trained to use all kinds of engines. • There are retiring rooms where we take breaks to sleep, eat and wait for the next shift. • There is continuous health check ups. Upto 45 years its once in 4 years, upto 55 years its once in 2 years and after 55 years its once a year. • In case of applying sudden brakes due to accidents, minimum distance the train would move after application of brakes varies from 500-1000m. When the train is travelling at
  8. 8. the speed of 110 km/hr, a distance of 1km is required for the train to completely suspend its motion after application of brake. • After working for 23 years we have also become one among the machines. 6.1 OPERATOR - RAMESH • Sitting is a problem. There is a stool on which we sit for a long time hence there is back pain. It’s difficult especially if one is old. • One has to peep a lot to see the signals. Especially when it is sunny, there is a lot of glare • My experience has helped me, guided and given me confidence to operate. • I have been a gauge operator, then an assistant and now a shunting engine operator. • No markings or color differentiation is present on the dashboard. 7 Health Concerns due to improper working conditions 7.1 FATIGUE Through the field study its observed that poor body posture, inadequate seat support and muscle fatigue as the body had to twist for most of the operations it is causing musculoskeletal disorders of the spine in operators/drivers. High prevalence of back pain, early degenerative changes of the spine, disc problems, diabetes, hypertension and piles has been consistently reported among the loco pilots. • Knee pain due to insufficient leg space. • Lack of toilets in long distant trains is one of the main reasons behind many loco pilots having diabetics. 7.2 SOUND POLLUTION Loco pilots like many other drivers are exposed to a lot of noise pollution. But the intensity of sound is much high in case of a train due to the standards followed. Prolonged and excessive
  9. 9. exposure to high intensity sounds is considered a general physical and mental stressor and is associated with a variety of occupational health disorders. 7.3 TEMPERATURE AND POLLUTION They are exposed to high temperatures, smoke and dust from the rail engine.
  10. 10. 8 DASHBOARD COMPONENTS WARNING INDICATORS TRACTION SPEED , BRAKE PRESSURE AND LUBE OIL INDICATORS BATTERY INDICATOR LIGHT INDICATOR ACCELERATOR HORNS REVERSE MOTION & BRAKE SPEED
  11. 11. EMERGENCY SWICHES USED FOR MONITORING CONTROL SWITCHES SPEED INDICATOR LUBE OIL BRAKE PRESSURE INDICATOR INDICATOR 1 2 VISIBILITY SITTING FROM SEAT
  12. 12. 8.1 DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DIESEL AND ELECTRIC ENGINE IN TERMS OF ERGONOMIC FACTORS Diesel engines The controls and the viewing window are in perpendicular directions. - The pilot has to turn his head thru wide angles while he looks at the controls and while he looks at the track. Electric Engines Viewing window and the controls are aligned in the same direction. - Hence lesser strain for the pilot. Communication between the pilot & assistant pilot The control board separates the pilot and assistant pilot: - Communication between them becomes very difficult Driving positions Not possible to stand and drive. Have to sit continuously . Window at the sides of the engine: - The pilot and the assistant have to stretch their heads outside the window to spot signals at curves. - Only side view of the track There are no partitions between the pilot and assistant pilot. The controls are right in front of them - Easier communication Flexibility of sitting and standing while driving Viewing window in front of engine at the centre - The pilot & assistant have full view of the track. - No strain for neck. - More cognitively sound Accessing controls Position of viewing windows Seating Seat mostly does not have back rest, or height adjustments. Few have rotation Seats have back rest and height adjustment and rotation. Few are foldable. - More comfort for back
  13. 13. 9 USERSTUDY ANALYSIS AND RESULTS Engine wheel is much heavier and harder as compared to the wheels of the coaches. Due this it has very less shock resistance. High levels of vibration. - High levels of discomfort experienced by the pilots. 9.1 VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE: During summers the temperatures become very hot inside the cab- hotter than the temperature outside. And during the winters very cold breeze enters the engine- this happens because the the doors are not air tight, because of which the Engine blowers suck in the air from the windows in the cab rather than from outside. This forces air into the cab. Working in extreme temperature affects the pilot physically and mentally- his efficiency and performance gets affected, undoubtedly. 9.2 SOUND POLLUTION: Loco pilots like many other drivers are exposed to a lot of noise pollution. But the intensity of sound is much high in case of a train due to the standards followed for various reasons. The sound they are subjected to is 80% higher than the normal hearing. Prolonged and excessive exposure to high intensity sounds causes physical and mental stress and is associated with a variety of occupational health disorders, including early deafness. 9.3 ACCESSIBILITY OF OPERATIONAL CONTROLS - Poor body posture, inadequate seat support and muscle fatigue have been described as co-factors in the pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders of the spine in operators/drivers. High prevalence of back pain, early degenerative changes of the spine and herniated lumbar disc problems have been consistently reported among - The current model of loco wdp4- is designed quiet biased towards the pilot. Although assistant loco pilot is equally held responsible for any mishaps that arise, the engine is not designed well for him. 9.4 SEATS - need to be more comfortable though they are adjustable the threads get worn out and the seat keeps sliding. The knob for controlling the rotation also comes off after a while and the pilots “keep dancing” on the seat Few seats don’t have height adjustment
  14. 14. 9.5 VISIBILITY - Although this loco being the latest model, this too suffers from poor visibility. The cabin is present at only one end and the pilot is expected to view thru a tiny window at the side of the cab- the track ahead is completely hidden Visibility of signals at curves are minimum The assistant loco pilot suffers much more because he has to face in one direction to view the track and has to twist his body tin the opposite direction to press the horn. 9.6 INTERPRETATION OF SIGNAL. High cognitive load on the operator. Interpretation is dependent on the operator’s mental alertness and involvement. Thus the safety of the system is highly dependent on the mental alertness/ performance of the operator. The system should be designed in such a way that its dependency on the individual performance is as minimum as possible. A more direct communication of critical information is recommended. 9.7 COHERENCE OF WARNING SYSTEMS Proactive decisions at emergency situations demand coherence of the warning signs. A coherent model would reduce the cognitive load in trying to make sense of the situation in an already panicky state. It has been observed that the Warning indicators are quiet disconnected from its Meaning and Magnitude indicators. A manual mapping of the warning and its cause needs to be done.
  15. 15. Recommendation: A more logical/ coherent mapping between the Warning Signals and the cause and Magnitude indicators are recommended 9.8 POOR FEEDBACK ON OPERATIONS/ACTIONS It was observed that for conformation/feedback of an action like turning ON a switch, the operator mainly relies on the sound produced by that particular equipment when it works, and no other visual conformation/feedback. For those equipments that donot produce the sound while its working, the operator must assume that his action has be registered and that the equipment has started functioning. Recommendation: It is recommended that the switches be provided with visual feedback (probably lights) that indicate the reception of the action(orange light), and the outcome of the action(green/red light corresponding to functioning well and not functioning). 9.9 GEARS & KNOBS - In the new models the gears Respond Finger touch- high sensitivity , they have to be careful, a little extra application will either male it full acceleration or fully break. In certain models the gear lever is in the form of a “Steering Wheel”- it does not afford “acceleration” but “direction change”- this is not a problem in normal conditions as the drivers have got used to it, but during emergencies a more natural interface would ease the cognitive load on the pilot and can support proactive decision making 9.10 KNOBS DETACHED To prevent the engine to be mishandled by unauthorized users the knobs are detached from the engine and placed there it. Or the driver carries the knobs with him when he gets out. This can lead to many hazardous situations- If the knobs are loosely fit and if it falls down, the operator’s attention may be diverted towards the knobs while attempting to search for it. During this period the system’s security is compromised. 9.11 CHANGING INTERFACES There are more than 18 types of engines that the drivers are supposed to drive. Although the controls are the same, the location and placement of the controls vary from engine to engine. Each driving a different engine, the driver has to adapt to the different placement- which may take some time and effort- this aspect can reduce the response time, or induce errors when the operator encounters an unexpected situation and has to act quickly. For eg) Some locos have accelerator on right hand side and the break on the left hand side, and some have it vice versa. When some emergency situation arises the driver, instead of applying the brakes might end up
  16. 16. applying the accelerator – due to the confusion created by the changing position of the controls in different engines 9.12 UNCLEAN WORKING ENVIRONMENT - - - The viewing window in many engines have been observed to be unclean. Although the drivers are able to all the major details through it, it is a strain for the eye to see thru the dust/dirt. Constantly viewing thru it can cause a strain to the eyes and nerves associated and can affect the eye sight of the operator in the long run. The sand sacks are placed within the engine itself- it is not only a barrier to the movement of the pilots, but it was observed the sand sacks tear and dirties the already tiny cab with sand. The engine components which the drivers come regularly in contact with are not cleaned often. Their hands always get dusty and grimy. 9.13 PARALLAX ERROR “Error in reading an instrument employing a scale and pointer because the observer's eye and pointer are not in a line perpendicular to the plane of the scale” - The Pilot has to view the window ahead of him and has to turn to look the speedometer. Since views the speedometer at an angle, he does not get accurate readings due parallax error. Parallax Error:
  17. 17. 9.14 INADEQUATE PROVISIONS FOR PLACING ITEMS - - - Important items like the Walkie-talkie which are a necessary part of the driving.. are not given any provisions. Generally they place it on the control board which poses many difficulties: o There is an open window next to the controls, the walkie-talkie may slip and fall out o While taking/ placing the walkie-talkie on the control board, there is high chance of accidentally affecting the switches/knobs nearby o In a particular engine where the stand for the walkie-talkie was given- its placement was such that it hit the pilot’s knee. They use a pen and have to maintain a record and a few papers throughout the journeybasic provision for pen and paper should be provided because they are important items and have to be maintained. They are kept cluttered on top of the controls sometime- this increases the number of visual elements within his area of sight and increases the strain in focusing on the meters. Where to Focus?
  18. 18. A Very Important Paper. But no safe place for it 9.15 NO BASIC AMENITIES - None of the Locos have toilets! Loco pilots have to wait for a station to arrive to go to the toilet They don’t have facility/table to eat properly. Many pilots wait for the station to arrive to eat comfortably. This may not suit the health of many as many of them suffer from diabetes and other age related issues
  19. 19. 10 CATEGORIZATION OF ISSUES Organization Of Dashboard: • No naming or indication of various meters • No explicit Fuel Indicators in many Locos • No uniform dashboard design Operational & Signal Related • Parallax error in viewing meters in bright sunlight • No recon_rmation of signals and internal signal indicators • One has to look out to view the track and the read the signal • High Intensity Light causes Glare while reading signals Issues due to Improper Ergonomics of the Cabin • • • • No leg space and Improper Seating Excessive noise due to horns and vibration No clear visibility of the track from the dashboard No hand rest and Leg rest
  20. 20. PROBLEM ANAYSIS Categorisation of Issues/Problem areas BrainStorming of User Study Design Concepts/ Proposals Final Design Brainstorming of User study
  21. 21. CATEGORISATION OF ISSUES/PROBLEM AREAS Dashboard Organisation Signal Related ENGINE CABIN Issues due to Improper Ergonomics of the Cabin Operational Issues ENGINE CABIN Dashboard Organisation Signal Related Closely Related Operational Issues Issues due to Improper Ergonomics of the Cabin In Short the entire Railway Cabin is not designed for the user who is the Locopilot and is lacking ERGOMICS in large scale
  22. 22. Key Issues in each area Dashboard Organisation Improper Organisation of Controls No naming or indication of various meters No explicit Fuel Indicators in many Locos Controls are scattered, unless one is experienced its difficult to know the exact usage and Location No uniform dashboard design Operational & Signal Related Parallax error in viewing meters in bright sunlight No reconfirmation of signals and internal signal indicators One has to look out to view the track and the read the signal High Intensity Light causes Glare while reading signals Issues due to Improper Ergonomics of the Cabin No leg space and Improper Seating Excessive noise due to horns and vibration No clear visibility of the track from the dashboard No hand rest and Leg rest
  23. 23. Dim Front Engine room lights Light Controls Bright Front Dim Rear Front Class lights Back Class Lights Bright Rear Guage Lights Engine Brakes Emergency Controls Coach Brake Fuel Indicator is not there at present. Fuel Indicator is a requirement Signal and Position Indicator Screen Sound Horn: Approaching Gate Crossing Approaching Signal 700m 3 mins away 700m 3 mins away Send Ack Prepare to Stop Prepare to find next signal displaying red Live View Crossed Signal Position Indicators 200m 5 mins ago Sent Ack Prepare to find next signal displaying red Signal Indicators Msg from Control Room Msg from Station Master CBE: Stop the Train Immediately- Terrorist Threat at CBE station
  24. 24. Selected Areas for Design Intervention 1. Sound Pollution 2. Communication reinforcement 3. Real time view 4. Accessible Operational systems 5. Public awareness Sound Pollution due to Horning Loco pilots like many other drivers are exposed to a lot of noise pollution. But the intensity of sound is much high in case of a train due to the standards followed for various reasons. Prolonged and excessive exposure to high intensity sounds is considered a general physical and mental stressor and is associated with a variety of occupational health disorders. Possible Solutions 1 Horns being operated from the signaling poles. Railway horns are to be blown at every signal. CAN A WAYSIDE HORN REPLACE A TRAIN HORN 2 Varying intensity of horn As the horns are manually operated, driver must be allowed to decide on the intensity of the horn to be blown. This helps in decreasing the noise pollution 3 Sound Proofing for engine cabins 4 Quiet zones - in which train crews are instructed not to sound their horns, except in case of emergency. Night time quite period for people staying in colonies by the railway lines. Communication Reinforcement The ease with which a person can recall information impacts the level and intensity of judgment related to the topic. In the current scenario, the communication has been Indirect. (Through Control room& Flags, except near stations and few places where walkie-talkie is used) and One Sided – only from the control room to the signal en-route. There is no direct acknowledgement of receiving & acting upon the signals. Solution It is recommended that the driver must send an acknowledgement of the signal received. Based on the feedback the next signal can be generated, or other measures can be taken in case a driver has failed to acknowledge it. Such an acknowledgement is necessary, because it makes accommodation for human error, and increases the chances of avoiding a disaster that may have been caused if a signal is missed.
  25. 25. Interpretation of Signal & Retaining it in memory Interpretation is dependent on the operator’s mental alertness and involvement. Thus the safety of the system is highly dependent on the mental alertness/ performance of the operator. Being in an environment with extreme physical conditions and discomfort, in addition to the added psychological pressure of the responsibility demanded of a pilot- the pilot is rarely in relaxed and peaceful state of mind- Due to which there is a good probability that he may misinterpret the signal at some point, or probably fail to remember the previous sign crossed, or get confused. Thus system should be designed in such a way that its dependency on the individual performance is as little as possible. Solution For this it is recommended that - The Signal’s interpretation also be made available to the driver - A log be maintained of the most recently crossed signal
  26. 26. - Alert/Reminder to take a particular action Track Visibility Many a times it is possible for the pilot to avoid an accident if he gets clear view of the track, and better even so if he gets the information earlier. Pilots and Assistant pilots both complain of lack visibility. They have to adopt very incontinent body postures to get a clear view of the track. Image: Loco Pilots seating position while viewing in reverse direction Image: Assistant drivers seating position while operating the train in running
  27. 27. Possible Solutions 1. Mirror Technology 2. On Screen Live Satellite/Schematic View of track (for long range view of the track ahead) 3. Live video of the immediate track ahead Public Awareness Public Awareness and creating a sense of responsibility is very important. The public need to be aware of interpretation of the signals at the crossings and behave responsibily. Human errors could be on any side It could be with the train operation or signal operation or with the common man.
  28. 28. Possible Solutions Posters, Videos, Banners, Digital Displays are good methods of creating awareness among public Focused Group Analysis A crude design of the dashboard was made and tested on the users - ast Locopilots during the focused group and their feedback was considered for the final design RESULTS Most of them were happy with the idea that one need not look outside to see ssignals and track. They were happy that they would be able to sit inside the cabin and operate at the dashboard itself They were also okay with the fact that the new dahboard would have space to keep some of their important documents and bottle They felt mere signal deatils wouldn’t help, they wanted the breaking speed indicator on the screen which would indicate how far they are from the nearest station and when will they have to brake to stop at the station
  29. 29. Final Design Proposals Combining all the elments discussed above, an effort has been made to design a new dashboard which is ergonomically as well as functionally efficient Signal/Position Indicator Indicators Fuel Indicator Space for Bottles and Writting Pad Horns & Lighting Controls Walkie Talkie for Communication Categorisation of Controls Brakes - (Reverse, Engine Brake, Coach brakes) On, Off Buttons Main Controls Accelerator (10 knotches) Traction Speed Horn Warning Controls Engine Siren Indicators Lube Oil Brake Pressure Battery Indicator

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