Presentation On Writing Quality Answers

1,242 views
1,134 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,242
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
11
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Presentation On Writing Quality Answers

  1. 1. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses “ A Teaching Tip” Created by Jana Scott MAP Regional Facilitator South Central Regional MAP Center University of MO-Rolla
  2. 2. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>In the instructional process , it is essential to teach students how to write quality responses. To do this, students need to know “upfront” what a quality answer involves. To define quality, scoring guides are often provided to students prior to an assignment. This helps guide the students’ endeavors and defines what is meant by a quality product. </li></ul><ul><li>The ultimate goal is to get students to internalize these “habits of the mind” and be able to demonstrate their mastery when called upon to do so on large scale assessments such as MAP, Stanford 9, Terra Nova, etc.) </li></ul>
  3. 3. The reasons it is not logical to give students scoring guides on MAP <ul><li>The nature of the “wording” used in constructed response questions and the student prompts tell the student what is expected by the response. Sometimes, a fill-in chart or answer lines are provided which cues the student to write that many answers. </li></ul><ul><li> Examples: give three reasons, use details and information to support your answer, write the steps/ show your work used to solve the problem, </li></ul><ul><li>use the checklist to self-edit, complete the chart, write answers on the </li></ul><ul><li>lines, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Exceptions would be ---- if the ability of the student to internalize specific information/ a process/ a format is one of the main objectives of the test question. </li></ul><ul><li>Example 1: If the one of the purposes of the test question is to see if students know to use letter format when asked to write a letter, then the </li></ul><ul><li>cue to use letter format would not be specified in the question. </li></ul><ul><li>Example 2: If one of the purposes of the test question is to see if </li></ul><ul><li>students will automatically include titles and labels on graphs, then the </li></ul><ul><li>cue to include titles and labels would not be specified in the question. </li></ul><ul><li>In summary: If one of the main purposes of a test question is to check for “internalization” of specific knowledge, cueing the student upfront about this knowledge would defeat the purpose of the test question. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Teaching Students to Write Quality Answers <ul><li>Often times, teachers want to include a few open-ended constructed response items on assignments and tests but do want the hassle of creating, copying, and distributing a scoring guide for each one of these items. </li></ul><ul><li>A suggestion for a quick easy way of providing students with the essential information as to what is expected for quality responses on items is given in this presentation. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>Create an age appropriate generic chart to hang on the wall and small desk charts that give a listing of criteria needed for the creation of top quality answers. In front of each criteria, put a number. </li></ul><ul><li>Criteria for Quality Answers Grade 5 </li></ul><ul><li>1. Address all parts of the question. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Include specific examples from the text. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Make reference to specific characters and </li></ul><ul><li>titles. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Give specific examples to support the </li></ul><ul><li>claim. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Show the major steps in your solution </li></ul><ul><li>process (math). </li></ul><ul><li>6. In addition to multiple likenesses, show </li></ul><ul><li>multiple sets of corresponding differences. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Include a title and labels on your graphic </li></ul><ul><li>organizer. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Don’t stop at just one correct answer. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about and write more correct answers. </li></ul><ul><li>9. When using pronouns in your answer, be sure </li></ul><ul><li>they are preceded by antecedents. </li></ul><ul><li>10. Use major elements of the question/ item stem </li></ul><ul><li>as statements in the answer. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>When writing test questions or questions for assignments, behind each one, put the numbers of the criteria that needs to be demonstrated for a top quality answer. </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Create a graphic organizer that shows how Snow </li></ul><ul><li>White and Cinderella are alike and how they are </li></ul><ul><li>different. (6, 7) </li></ul><ul><li>Explain why George Washington is considered to </li></ul><ul><li>be a ‘Founding Father’ of our nation. (4, 8, 9) </li></ul><ul><li>If each person eats 1/4 of a pizza and each pizza </li></ul><ul><li>costs $12.00, how many pizzas would be needed </li></ul><ul><li>to feed 18 people. What would be the total cost? </li></ul><ul><li>(1, 5) </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the role ‘fear of animals’ plays in each of </li></ul><ul><li>the stories Little Red Riding Hood , The Three </li></ul><ul><li>Bears , and The Three Little Pigs . (2, 3, 9) </li></ul>
  7. 7. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>Instruct students to look at the chart prior to responding to the question to determine what a quality answer involves. Once the student has written the answer, have him/her examine the answer for its ability to meet the specified criteria. They should mark through each of the numbers once they are satisfied their answer has met the specified criterion. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Explain the role ‘fear of animals’ plays in each of the stories Little Red Riding Hood , The Three Bears , and The Three Little Pigs . (2, 3, 9) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>When the teacher grades the student response, she/he can put a + or - under each of the numbers to indicate whether or not the student’s response met the specified criterion. This will provide the student with the needed formative feedback to modify the answer and/or act as a prescription for improving future responses to these same types of open-ended constructed response items. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Explain the role ‘fear of animals’ plays in each of the stories Little Red Riding Hood , The Three Bears , and The Three Little Pigs . (2, 3, 9) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>Make charts that are age appropriate for every classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Target one or two criteria at the beginning of the school year. </li></ul><ul><li>As the school year progresses, add additional criteria. </li></ul><ul><li>See examples of age appropriate charts. Teachers can modify these to meet the needs of their students. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>1. Answer the “whole” question. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Make your answer interesting by using “naming” words. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Tell how things are alike and ways they are different. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Think about and tell or draw many correct answers. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Answer in complete sentences. </li></ul>Writing Quality Answers Kindergarten Sentence
  11. 11. <ul><li>Answer the ‘whole’ question. </li></ul><ul><li>Make your answer interesting by using “naming” words. </li></ul><ul><li>Show how to find answers. 1 + 1= 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Give reasons for your ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Show how things are like and how they are different. </li></ul><ul><li>Write ‘titles’ in your pictures. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about and tell many answers. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell the question in your answer. </li></ul>Writing Quality Answers Grade 1 school kids
  12. 12. Writing Quality Answers Grade 2 <ul><li>1. Answer the “whole” question. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Use “details” from the story in your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Use “names” in your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Always give reasons for your ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Show your work when doing math problems. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Show how things are alike and “sets” of how things are different. </li></ul><ul><li>Use titles and labels on your pictures and charts. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about and write many correct answers. </li></ul><ul><li>Use “names” instead of “he”, “she”, “it” “they” </li></ul><ul><li>10. Tell the question in your answer. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Writing Quality Answers Grade 3 <ul><li>1 . Answer all parts of the question. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Use “details” from the story in your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Use “names” in your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Always give reasons for your ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Show your work when doing math problems. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Show how things are alike and “sets” of how things are different. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Include a title and labels on your graphic organizer. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Think about and write many correct answers. </li></ul><ul><li>9. Use “names” instead of “he”, “she”, “it” “they” </li></ul><ul><li>10. Tell the question in your answer. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Writing Quality Answers Grade 4 <ul><li>1. Answer all parts of the question. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Include specific examples in your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to specific characters and titles. </li></ul><ul><li>Give reasons to support your ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Show your work when doing math problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell how things are similar and “sets” of differences. </li></ul><ul><li>Include a title and labels on your graphic organizer. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Don’t stop at just one correct answer. Think about and write more correct answers. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead of using “he”, “she” they” and other pronouns, use names. </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat information from the question in the answer. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Writing Quality Answers Grades 5-12 <ul><li>1. Address all parts of the question. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Include specific examples from the text. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Make reference to specific characters and titles. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Give specific examples to support the claim. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Show the major steps in your solution process (math). </li></ul><ul><li>In addition to multiple likenesses, show multiple sets of </li></ul><ul><li>corresponding differences. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Include a title and labels on your graphic organizer. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Don’t stop at just one correct answer. Think about and write more correct answers. </li></ul><ul><li>When using pronouns in your answer, be sure they are preceded by antecedents. </li></ul><ul><li>10. Use major elements of the question/ item stem as statements in the answer. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>This teaching tip can be used throughout the school year at an age appropriate level in all classrooms K-12. </li></ul><ul><li>The goal is to get students to internalize the information contained on the chart. </li></ul><ul><li>It is suggested the chart be used in the instructional process as a teaching tool and rather than a cue during state testing. </li></ul><ul><li>Once the students have become proficient in creating quality responses to open-ended constructed response items, remove the chart from the wall. </li></ul><ul><li>Set a goal (date or time span) for the internalization of the information by students. For example: 85% of my students will know and be able to apply 85% of the information on the chart by the beginning of the 2nd Semester. </li></ul><ul><li>Periodically, remove the chart from the wall to see how much of the chart’s information has been internalized. Look at the results to determine which criteria needs to be addressed in greater detail. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>Just hanging the chart on the wall or putting small charts on desktops will not teach students how to write quality answers. The process described in this presentation needs to occur throughout the school year to teach students to write quality responses. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Teaching Students to Write Quality Responses <ul><li>In addition to the criteria listed on the sample chart included in this presentation, there are “content” specific tips needed for success in answering open-ended questions. </li></ul><ul><li>The listing in this presentation is generic and cuts across many disciplines. It is a good starting point. </li></ul><ul><li>For a more subject specific listing of tips for improving student achievement, talk with your district’s MAP Senior Leader or call the MAP Regional Facilitator in your region. </li></ul>
  19. 19. The Benefit of Writing Quality Answers <ul><li>Writing quality responses is an essential skill for success on MAP. </li></ul><ul><li>More importantly, this same skill is essential for success in the life and the world of work. </li></ul><ul><li>Our jobs as educators is to prepare students for success beyond school. </li></ul>
  20. 20. In Closing……… <ul><li>If you have questions about the material in this presentation or suggestions for making it better, please call Roblyn Hatch, at the Southeast MAP Center. 1-800-401-6680, extension 2. </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail address: rhatch@semo.edu </li></ul>

×