Fictional Map Released The Laundromat Scoring Guide

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Fictional Map Released The Laundromat Scoring Guide

  1. 1. MAP Com Arts Practice Test Grade 3- Fiction The Laundromat Scoring Guide
  2. 2. <ul><li>Constructed Response (CR) Item 1, GLE R2C </li></ul><ul><li>2 pts The response includes the names of three machines cited in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Example—washer, change machine, dryer </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt The response includes the names of two machines cited in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>0 pts Other </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Constructed Response (CR) Item 2, GLE R2C </li></ul><ul><li>2 pts The response includes three text-based events in order. </li></ul><ul><li>Example—dumped the clothes on a table, sorted them in piles, put dollar in the change </li></ul><ul><li>machine, put quarters in the machines, or other events in order </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt The response includes two text-based events in order or three text-based events out of </li></ul><ul><li>sequence. </li></ul><ul><li>0 pts Other </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Constructed Response (CR) Item 3, GLEs R2C/W3E Part A </li></ul><ul><li>2 pts The response includes three text-based ways the narrator helped Mama at the laundromat. </li></ul><ul><li>Example—sort the clothes, put quarters in the machines, bought a can of soda to share, put </li></ul><ul><li>dollars in the change machine, or other text-based ways </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt The response includes two text-based ways. </li></ul><ul><li>0 pts Other </li></ul><ul><li>Example– </li></ul><ul><li>January 5, 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Dear Sandy, </li></ul><ul><li> I went to the laundromat with Mama last week and I helped her with washing the clothes. I sorted the clothes, put quarters in the machines, and put dollars in the change machine. We completed our work very quickly. </li></ul><ul><li>Sincerely, </li></ul><ul><li>Paul </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Part B </li></ul><ul><li>2 pts The response includes at least two components of letter writing format (heading/date, </li></ul><ul><li>greeting, closing, signature, indentation) and the letter is a complete message with a </li></ul><ul><li>controlling idea that shows awareness of the intended audience. (See example above.) </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt The response includes at least two components of letter writing format OR the letter is a </li></ul><ul><li>complete message with a controlling idea that shows awareness of the intended audience. </li></ul><ul><li>0 pts Other </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Constructed Response (CR) Item 4, GLE R2C </li></ul><ul><li>Part A </li></ul><ul><li>2 pts The response includes two items mentioned in the story and a reasonable text-based </li></ul><ul><li>explanation for each. </li></ul><ul><li>Example-- </li></ul><ul><li>Doing the Family Laundry </li></ul><ul><li>Items I Need -Why I need Each Item </li></ul><ul><li>1. dirty clothes- to wash them </li></ul><ul><li>2. soap- to make clothes clean </li></ul><ul><li>3. quarters- for soda, washer, or dryer </li></ul><ul><li>4. dollars- for the change machine </li></ul><ul><li>5. hula hoop- to practice </li></ul><ul><li>Other reasonable items from the story </li></ul><ul><li>Other </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt The response includes one item from the story and a reasonable text-based explanation for </li></ul><ul><li>the item. </li></ul><ul><li>0 pts Other </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Part B </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt The chart is appropriately titled. </li></ul><ul><li>0 pts Other </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Constructed Response (CR) Item 5, GLE R2C </li></ul><ul><li>2 pts The response includes two details from the story indicating why the child would not want </li></ul><ul><li>the repairman to fix their machine too soon. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: The child likes to watch the clothes in the dryer, gets to drink soda, and gets to </li></ul><ul><li>help Mama. </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt The response includes one detail from the story. </li></ul><ul><li>0 pts Other </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Selected Response (SR) Item 6, GLE R2C </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt A </li></ul><ul><li>Selected Response (SR) Item7, GLE R1H </li></ul><ul><li>1 pt B </li></ul>
  10. 10. Brain Break!
  11. 11. Writing Prompt <ul><li>In the story, the child helps her mother do laundry. Write a story about a time when you or someone you know helped someone. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Let’s Add Voice! <ul><li>Is my writing personalized? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it me? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this writing sound like me? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you tell I am enthusiastic about my topic? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this writing sound like me? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I want my readers to feel? </li></ul><ul><li>Will my story hold readers' attention? </li></ul><ul><li>Will they want to hear more? </li></ul>
  13. 13. Read the two stories below and decide which author grabs and holds your attention. <ul><li>I went canoeing with friends. They brought their dog. It was hot outside. The water felt good. The dog liked to play in the water with us. We all got wet. It was fun! </li></ul><ul><li>One sizzling August afternoon my friends and I cruised down the Wisconsin River on a bright red canoe. Their energetic golden retriever, Paddington, rode along with us. Whenever one of us would shout, &quot;Switch sides,&quot; Paddington would jump up and dance around. One time he leaped so high, he tipped the bouncing boat. We all flopped into the water splashing and laughing like baby seals. What fun! </li></ul><ul><li>Which story was more fun to read? In the second story you could hear the writer's voice. The author's enthusiasm made it easy for readers to imagine what was happening. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Student Sample #1: Voice Grade I would give this: 3 - 4 <ul><li>Do You Ever Wonder Why Lab Mice Have Big Brains? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you ever wonder what scientists do? Or how about what they look like? Well, here’s what I know about scientists. Scientists wear long, white lab coats, white rubber gloves, and funny-looking safety goggles. </li></ul><ul><li>Scientists that work with animals go out in the wild and capture an animal and measure how long it is, and then they let them go. </li></ul><ul><li>When scientists do experiments they always are making a lot of noises, like the sound of a fake volcano blowing up or chemicals bubbling through tubes into little skinny bottles. If you were to walk into their science lab you would see mice with huge brains scampering around and a mad scientists running after them screaming, “Come back, come back!” And you would see computers and machines and huge freezers for mammoth bones. </li></ul><ul><li>I like scientists because they are always doing experiments and finding out something new. I like scientists that experiment on animals because I love animals. </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Student Sample #2: Voice </li></ul><ul><li>Grade I would give this: 2 </li></ul><ul><li>A scientist is smart, tall, skinny with chemicals surrounding him. He wears a big lab coat with pockets and shoes on. They have shelves, tables, chairs and cupboards. Scientists do experiments on the earth, other planets, blood, people, dinosaurs bones, mummies and diseases. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Six Scoring Guide Categories: <ul><li>1. Organization </li></ul><ul><li>2. Focus </li></ul><ul><li>3. Development </li></ul><ul><li>4. Complete Sentences </li></ul><ul><li>5. Vocabulary </li></ul><ul><li>6. Mechanics and Spelling </li></ul>. ! ?
  17. 17. Contains repeated errors in grammar/usage, punctuation, capitalization, and/or spelling that may be distracting to the reader. Contains errors in grammar/usage, punctuation, capitalization, and/or spelling which may be distracting to the reader. May contain some errors in grammar/usage, punctuation, capitalization, and/or spelling which are not significantly distracting to the reader. Contains few errors in grammar/usage, punctuation, capitalization, and/or spelling. Mechanics and Spelling Words are consistently repetitive, dull, and colorless. Words tend to be repetitive, imprecise, and ordinary. Contains some words that are specific, accurate, and related to the topic. Contains words that are specific, accurate, and suited to the topic. Vocabulary Includes incomplete sentences which are distracting to the reader. Contains some incomplete sentences which may be distracting to the reader. Generally uses complete sentences. Consistently uses complete sentences. Complete Sentences Attempts to address topic, but lacks development. Generally addresses the topic, but may contain some details that are not relevant. Addresses the topic and uses relevant details/examples Clearly addresses the topic and provides specific and relevant details/examples.. Development Is difficult to follow and or lacks focus. Contains a general sense of direction, but may lack in focus. Contains a controlling idea. Contains a clear and controlling idea that is fully developed. Focus May lack evidence of a beginning, middle, or end. Has evidence of a beginning, middle, and end. Has a beginning, middle, and end. Has an effective beginning, middle, and end. Organization 1 2 3 4
  18. 18. Let’s Write! <ul><li>Pre-write, Brainstorm, Graphic Organizer </li></ul><ul><li>First Draft, Rough Draft, or Sloppy Copy </li></ul><ul><li>Edit </li></ul><ul><li>Revise </li></ul><ul><li>Publish or Final Copy </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Editor’s Checklist </li></ul><ul><li>____ My writing has a clear and controlling idea that is fully developed. </li></ul><ul><li>____ I have clearly addressed the topic and provided specific and relevant details and examples. </li></ul><ul><li>____ I have used complete sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>____ My writing has words that are specific, accurate, and suited to the topic. </li></ul><ul><li>____ I have checked for errors in grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling. </li></ul>

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