Reaching out to Schools

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Speakers: Alice Young, Head of Arts Award Programme, Arts Award; Sara Candy, Executive Director, Opening Minds and Louise Thomas, Senior researcher, RSA - Discover how Arts Award can help support your younger audiences and enable
your organisation to develop links with schools, colleges, youth services and arts
organisations. Hear also about the RSA’s Opening Minds and Area Based Curriculum
work with museums, heritage sites and schools on curriculum co-design – making
the most of the environment beyond the classroom in collaborative and practical ways.

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  • The RSA’s Area Based Curriculum work is part of the same family as Opening Minds and in fact came out of work that schools doing Opening Minds were already doing with their communities. We discovered that some schools doing Opening Minds were constructing their curriculum around engagement with outside agencies – both enriching the curriculum through learning outside the classroom and with people from outside of school, and at the same addressing some of the social issues faced by the school. For example, one school in Liverpool addressed the issue of social cohesion between the children who were fans of Everton and those who were fans of Liverpool by engaging with both of the stadiums and having the children design recycling policies for both of them, including visits to the stadia, visits by the staff there to the schools, and bringing all their geography and science and maths into the project as well as a range of Opening Minds competences. Why were they doing this? To an extent this can be explained by a staff team being given permission and space to sit down and think hard about what they want their curriculum to achieve.
  • But I think it’s about a bit more than that. Opening Minds requires that we think differently about how children learn. Opening Minds offers the chance to structure the curriculum in a different way. The five competence areas - Citizenship, Learning, Information, People and Situations - could be seen like ‘faculties’ and the competences in them like ‘subjects’ within those faculties. But rather than a list of things that children need to know, with essential skills mixed in, we’re talking about a list of things that children need to know how to do, with essential knowledge mixed in.Let’s take these two examples, picked pretty much at random from the list of competences that make up the Opening Minds framework. How can we teach these? What are the best tools? Are the best tools a classroom, a textbook or a whiteboard? Can any teacher claim to be a specialist in these things?We found that schools learned early on that it was much easier to teach competences by finding authentic learning experiences for children. What better way to learn about how society and government work than for the children to campaign about something they care about, and write to their MP? This could of course also be a good way to learn about failure – another Opening Minds competence. And literacy of course. What better way to learn about the meaning of change than to interview older people in the local community about how it has changed over time, and how they have coped or not coped? A good way to engage children with history as well.
  • The RSA’s Area Based Curriculum work is part of the same family as Opening Minds and in fact came out of work that schools doing Opening Minds were already doing with their communities. We discovered that some schools doing Opening Minds were constructing their curriculum around engagement with outside agencies – both enriching the curriculum through learning outside the classroom and with people from outside of school, and at the same addressing some of the social issues faced by the school. For example, one school in Liverpool addressed the issue of social cohesion between the children who were fans of Everton and those who were fans of Liverpool by engaging with both of the stadiums and having the children design recycling policies for both of them, including visits to the stadia, visits by the staff there to the schools, and bringing all their geography and science and maths into the project as well as a range of Opening Minds competences. Why were they doing this? To an extent this can be explained by a staff team being given permission and space to sit down and think hard about what they want their curriculum to achieve.
  • Reaching out to Schools

    1. 1.
    2. 2. RSA <br />Charity, established in the enlightenment <br />Fellowship organisation <br />Civic innovation and social progress <br />Encourage public discourse and critical debate <br />Public events programme, publications and discussion forums <br />In-house team – research, policy and practical action <br />Diversity of policy areas <br />Seek to generate new models to tackle social challenges <br />
    3. 3. RSA Education <br /><ul><li>RSA Education seeks to realise the potential of all learners. Our key areas of focus are: curriculum innovation and the promotion of democracy and social justice in education
    4. 4. Curriculum innovation - seek to develop engaging curricula that:
    5. 5. broadens the existing curriculum
    6. 6. ensures the social, civic and economic relevance of curricula
    7. 7. meets learners' needs in terms of educational engagement and achievement, and wellbeing</li></li></ul><li>
    8. 8. What is a curriculum?<br />Mathematics<br />English<br />PE<br />PSHE<br />Citizenship<br />Drama<br />Biology<br />Chemistry<br />Physics<br />ICT<br />History<br />RE<br />Geography<br />Art, Design and Technology<br />Music<br />Modern Foreign Language(s)<br />Business studies<br />
    9. 9. What is a curriculum?<br />Being able to apply learning<br />Creative and critical thinking<br />Communication and presentation skills<br />Working in teams<br />Problem solving <br />Knowing how to research<br />Reflective learning<br />Managing relationships<br />Resilience<br />
    10. 10. What is learning?<br />
    11. 11. What is Opening Minds? <br /><ul><li>Brings together subject content and practical know how
    12. 12. An innovative competence based curriculum
    13. 13. Offers students the opportunities they need to develop in areas critical to their social, economic and personal well-being.
    14. 14. Competences are categorised under the domains:</li></ul>- Citizenship<br /><ul><li>Learning
    15. 15. Managing Information
    16. 16. Relating to people
    17. 17. Managing Situations
    18. 18. Over 200 schools Opening Minds schools</li></li></ul><li>The RSA Opening Minds competences<br />Relating to People<br />Managing Information<br />Managing Situations<br />Citizen-<br />ship<br />Learning<br />Morals and ethics<br />Learning styles<br />Research<br />Time management<br />Leadership<br />Making a difference<br />Coping with change<br />Reasoning<br />Reflection<br />Teamwork<br />Feeling and reactions<br />Diversity<br />Creativity<br />Coaching<br />Technological impact<br />Positive motivation<br />Creative thinking<br />Communication<br />Emotional intelligence<br />Self-reliance<br />Key skills<br />Risk taking<br />Stress management<br />ICT skills<br />
    19. 19. Integrating competences with subject content<br />Design Technology<br />History <br />Maths<br />Geography<br />PE<br />Drama<br />English<br />Science<br />Music<br />Languages<br />Citizenship<br />Learning<br />Managing Information<br />Relating to People<br />Managing Situations<br />
    20. 20. Integrating competences with subject content<br /><ul><li>Subject knowledge and competences are cross-matched and this enables students to:
    21. 21. acquire in-depth subject knowledge; and
    22. 22. understand, use and apply it within the context of their wider learning and life
    23. 23. Students become both more effective and resilient learners and confident young people who are able to work in teams and support each other </li></li></ul><li>Working in collaboration <br /><ul><li>Flexible – each school develops a curriculum for their own context
    24. 24. Experiential learning is key for successful delivery
    25. 25. Examples of working in collaboration:
    26. 26. Black Country Living Museum in Tipton
    27. 27. Dudley Zoo
    28. 28. National Gallery </li></li></ul><li>Further information<br /><ul><li>You can find out more at www.rsaopeningminds.org.uk</li></li></ul><li>RSA Area Based Curriculum<br />Engaging the local area in curriculum design<br />
    29. 29. Opening Minds and the Area Based Curriculum<br />Opening Minds was the initial inspiration for a curriculum that draws on the local area<br />Schools doing Opening Minds spontaneously engaged with communities and the world outside school<br />Re-thinking the curriculum allowed the space for them to think about new ways of doing things<br />
    30. 30. Opening Minds and the Area Based Curriculum<br /><ul><li>But it was about more than that: Opening Minds requires authentic learning to come alive. E.g.
    31. 31. Competences for Citizenship: Making a difference – students understand how society, government and business work, and the importance of active citizenship
    32. 32. Competences for Managing Situations: Coping with change – students understand what is meant by managing change , and develop a range of techniques for use in varying situations</li></li></ul><li>Area Based Curriculum – what’s happening now<br />Area Based Curriculum work in Manchester previously and Peterborough now<br />Using the Cathedral to look at issues of faith and history, Peterborough United Football Club looking at ideas of belonging and health, Railway heritage centre to look at vehicles, design and sustainability<br />
    33. 33.
    34. 34.
    35. 35.
    36. 36.
    37. 37.
    38. 38.
    39. 39.
    40. 40. RSA Area Based Curriculum<br />www.thersa.org/areabasedcurriculum<br />
    41. 41. Arts Award in your setting<br />
    42. 42. Arts Award_______________________________________________________ <br /><ul><li>national qualification
    43. 43. arts practice & leadership
    44. 44. 40,000 awards & growing fast
    45. 45. flexible & accessible format
    46. 46. run by Trinity College London in association with Arts Council England </li></li></ul><li>What young people do?_______________________________________________________ <br /><ul><li>Participate in the arts
    47. 47. Attend & review arts events
    48. 48. Research an artist
    49. 49. Share arts skills with others
    50. 50. record their work </li></li></ul><li>How does it work?_______________________________________________________ <br />
    51. 51. why do it?organisation perspective_____________________________ _______________ <br /> The framework of the Arts Award enabled our project to be led by young people more than previous projects. It also strengthened our collaborative work with schools. The Lowry, Salford <br /><ul><li>using Arts Award to structure projects
    52. 52. resources for educators
    53. 53. partnership opportunities
    54. 54. evidence of organisations achievement</li></li></ul><li>why do it?young person’s perspective__________________________________________________ <br />“ I think the best thing I could say about Arts Award is that it creates possibilities you can’t imagine, it’s a brilliant way to unlock potential that I think we all possess, but in different ways" Ed, Silver Arts Award achiever in Poole <br /><ul><li>framework for learning
    55. 55. places personal experience in wider context
    56. 56. accreditation</li></li></ul><li>case study___________________________________ <br />‘There was…a cultural shift in the girls’ attitudes as they began to feel more comfortable in a place like the Fitzwilliam Museum. A number of girls have also shown an interest in further education, which is a fantastic result’. member of staff<br />‘I love art more now!’ <br />participant <br />
    57. 57. case study___________________________________ <br />‘As the Education and Events Officer for Adults and Young People, I have found that incorporating Arts Award has allowed me to structure the project concisely and ensured that all young people gained a consistent level of engagement and attainment. It has also allowed the SCVA to collect tangible evidence of the involvement and impact of young people’<br />‘Arts Award has been the most valuable thing I have taken from this experience. I love thinking creatively and ‘doing’ art but find it almost impossible to make time for when there is no one or anything to encourage or motivate you’ participant <br />
    58. 58. Get involved____________<br /><ul><li>Arts Award adviser training</li></ul>www.artsaward.org.uk/booktraining<br /><ul><li> Arts Award Welcome organisations</li></ul>www.artsaward.org.uk/welcome<br />0207 820 6178<br />enquiries@artsaward.org.uk<br />

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