Building Relationships with Visitors

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Speaker: Led by Penny Mills, Director of Client Services, Audiences London - So you’ve got them hooked - now how do you keep relationships with visitors going? Join us to discover how cultural organisations have deepened relationships with a wide range of visitors, through ambassador programmes, membership schemes,
events, interpretation and more.

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  • Tools and approaches to decide how you might build relationships… you need to chose the one that’s good for you!In a world of constant interaction, user generated content and trip advisor… the idea of building a relationship has taken on a new meaning… Here are some examples that perhaps have not taken the obvious route… colaborating with other organisations, allowing visitors to influence and programme activities and tailoring your membership… to respond to differing visitor motivations.
  • Have you asked them who they are… through research etc. Do you have a good working segmentation?Did you make sure that they were offered the best possible customer service and experience when they were with you… best way of getting them to come back and/or recommend othersDo they know enough about you, your work etc. through interpretation, information etc.So what would the ROI be in investing in building a relationship?
  • Today’s presentations have given you an insight into this – the Galleries project – collaborative benchmarking and also the LSO’s and orchestra’s work… Knowledge should be the basis of any activity.Ideally you would develop a segmentation of your audience to understand their diversity and develop your own insights.
  • How close to the tree are they? How far from the tree might they fall or place themselves? Obviously there’s a difference between how close you think the relationship is and how close your visitor or potential visitor thinks it is… so always need to see from two perspectives.
  • To assess Return on investment… thing about the depth of relationship you currently have and how deep you’d like it to become and then think about the amount of organisational resources required… and consider what’s worth while…
  • Earlier today heard about this one… for people who’ve attended a few times… how do you deepen that realtionship?To help people develop their interest.They don’t know the artists, or affiliate with a particular orchestra, or know much about music…Obviously a fairly high investment in working in partnership to engage audiences in this way… but by offering an experience it doesn’t matter so much which orchestra and the relationship is with the experience, not the organisation… need to be a little altruistic as an organisation… but it’s not speaking to your core or regular people…. Yet to see the longer-term impacts of such a campaign
  • Similarly in theatre – a segmentation Based on people who’d attended once or twice… Getting to the heart of motivations to try and hook them into a deeper relationship with the idea of theatre… as a regular activity.
  • One big issue was the need for more guidance about what to attend – many meant to come back but felt they were out of the loop of information or couldn’t decide what to go to or find what they were interested in… So these edited sites provide difference ways of chosing as well as acknowledging that people are looking for experiences, as much as culture…Here you’re matching mood and experience, rather than writer, director, actor etc.
  • From a strong starting point ie. engagement with families… how can you deepen a relationship?Turning the idea of engaging with families on its head ie. they tell you what they want… by looking for a family panel to work with to integrate audience needs into planning and increase the engagement of local families.but families are busy and you might only be on thing they do… ie. swimming, library etc. So, only a certain type of family who might engage – and you need to think beyond the traditional parent/carer and child… can be extended and multi-generational. In this case it was families who occupied another local space who felt some ownership. They are now co-planning a future programme – doing things together rather than ‘providing’ things – doing joint funding applications (because of community involvement can apply to new funding pots). Finding people who want to shape activity, rather than just turn up and do. Also engaged their Board as well… Re-invigorated their outreach/education work!
  • Engaged a community through an event… but relationship then held through a venue ie. event was by Poetry Translation Society at the Bluecoat gallery… the Somali community are now ongoing ambassadors for the Bluecoat and work front of house…Doing a project often allows you to get to know a community and then you can understand how to better engage with them for the long-term – gives confidence on both sides to develop a more fruitful relationship. But this took a year’s work and product was obviously directly relevant.
  • A bit of a twist on the old ambassador scheme… in that it is inovatively marketed – give and take and longer-term impacts1.You need to buy pasta, pay library fines, top up the oyster card, and keep the lights on. We realise this. On average, each student ticket saves a 46% on the usual ticket price.2. Save on the price, not the experience. Once you get here, we'll give you a free drink at our student reception, the programme will be free too, and we try and make sure you’re next to your friends.  3. Open closed doors. Opportunities to meet the artists, watch the LSO rehearse, backstage tours and much much more…4. Keep your finger on the pulse. A unique online experience that allows you to shape the events, ideas and initiatives of pulse5. We don't think a free pen is enough. A range of exclusive rewards such as LSO Live CDs, Barbican vouchers and concert tickets for our ambassadors6. Keep your eye on the prize. Earn experiences of a lifetime, like meeting some of the biggest names in music, or joining the LSO in Paris...7. And, finally, with the other eye on the future... An unparalleled experience for your CV that employers will value highly
  • Membership schemes are diverseSeason tickets at one end – membership schemes – friends schemes – to patronsBenefits might include free admission, magazines, members’ events, discounts in the shop, cafe, reciprocal benefits, gateway to volunteering, garden party for cathedralsWho joins these schemes?The number of members at museums & heritage sites is often 250 to 499 members, the very large e.g. Tate, RA are unusualA large share normally live locally, & members tend to make a large share of overall visits to a site, esp. When there is an admission feeMembers motivations Reflect the package of benefits and individual’s needsHedonic – pleasure, pastime, entertainmentAltruism – includes volunteering time and giving money, preserve artAchievement orientated – learn new knowledge or skillsSocial – inter-personal, making new friends and networking
  • The success of membership is often related to a changing exhibition programmeIf people get bored they go elsewhere unless their motivations are purely philanthropicAttractive membership packages e.g. Free admission will get new membersFamiliarity with your product/ brand reminds people about you / what you doMore touch points they have with you the more involved they becomeWant a sense of belongingCommunicate with your membersYou have an ideal opportunity to speak to these people on a regular basis through letters/ email etc. That is what makes building a relationship easierHave to show that you care/ are appreciativeTalk to your membersAsk them what they enjoyed, want etc.If you organise trips talk to the members to find out their interests, contactsWhy do people lapse?They may want to keep in touch with you/ help in another way/ have forgotten to renewe.g. Of trips where find out about members – their interests/links/what they do for their lives – opportunities for in-kind support etc.The most important tool for most membership schemes is word of mouth
  • Changed their levels as felt there was a gap at the lower level…£150 named according to motivation, expectations etc… so added in lower levels and a £1500 one as well.Priority booking/advance notice when available What’s On brochures posted to you Quarterly supporters’ news update Access to members’ area on the Roundhouse website Dedicated ticket booking via the Development team Invitations to private Roundhouse Studios performances Accreditation as a supporter on the Roundhouse website Two free tickets and programmes to 2 Roundhouse produced or commissioned productions per year Invitations for 2 to special events, pre-gig receptions and opening night parties Free Emerging Artist memberships for two 25s or under Accreditation as a supporter in Roundhouse produced programmes Private tour for up to 4 people twice a year Fast track entrance at music gigs for you and up to 4 guests Free Members’ Bar access for you and up to 4 guests (for music gigs, subject to availability) Free Members’ Cloakroom use for you and up to 4 guests (for music gigs, subject to availability) No online or phone booking fees on 12 tickets per year Priority table reservation at Made In Camden Dinner for two at Made In Camden  And a hole at the higher level… £1500 where people get more accreditation and a closer relationship… Matching the motivations of those people. Can thereby increase income, by targeting the different motivations and levels to donate.Events are now a key offering for many organisations or a separate space ie. Tate Members Room etc.
  • And anecdotally, many of the families involved went on to have a longer relationship as volunteers – which the National Trust rely on.Families as Testers: Osterley Park and HouseFamilies were involved as testers at properties. In this role they road tested prototype versions of final interpretation. This was a critical role in terms of ensuring the effective usability and enjoyment of final interpretative pieces. The type of ways families were involved as testers included:Testing a prototype of the Osterley Compass to check the compass was easy to understand and use. Trying out an interactive puppet booth at Osterley to discover how families connected this imaginative experience with their visit to the historic rooms. Testing out a prototype version of the Voyages Map at Ham House to determine the right number of objects to be included in the final guide. The tester role works well with families you have a longer term relationship with a place and one off family visitors. People feel incredibly valued to be asked to try things out for you and generally jump at the opportunity!back to top
  • Don’t make too many conditions or hoops – it should be easy to keep a relationship going…Don’t forget you’ll have to build things, it won’t happen overnight
  • Building Relationships with Visitors

    1. 1. Building Relationships with VisitorsPenny Mills Audiences London<br />Museums & Heritage Show 2011<br />© Audiences London 2011<br />
    2. 2. So, you don’t want to lose them…<br />Do you know your visitors?<br />Did they have a good time?<br />Are they worth getting back?<br />What do you expect from the relationship?<br />What benefits can you offer?<br />Have you got time?<br />© Audiences London 2011<br />
    3. 3. Getting to know your visitors<br />Regular visitor monitoring surveys<br />Primary research focused on particular questions<br />Comments cards/books/walls<br />Suggestion boxes<br />Conversations within social media<br />Conversations in person<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    4. 4. How close are your visitors to you?<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />Been once <br />or twice…<br />Local <br />Families<br />Loyal<br />Regulars<br />Frequent<br />Diverse<br />Communities<br />Student <br />Ambassadors<br />
    5. 5. What will work for your organisation?<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />Community Engagement<br />Members, patronsfriends<br />Programming/Curation/ Events<br />Shadow board<br />Ambassadors<br />Advocates<br />Testers<br />Volunteers<br />Depth of relationship<br />Social networking/ interactivity<br />Mystery shopping<br />E/Mailing list<br />Organisational resources<br />
    6. 6. Using your insights…1<br />Music to Remember campaign with Time Out<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    7. 7. Using your Insights…2<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    8. 8. Using your insights…2<br />www.tastetheatre.com<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    9. 9. Family Advocates<br />Café Gallery Projects – CGP London<br />Strong family events programme<br />Good list of family contacts<br />Connected with other local projects involving families<br />Moving from ‘providing’ to co-planning<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    10. 10. Engaging communities…working with…<br />Poetry Translation Centre<br />Translated work of Somali poets and co-hosted reading of work at Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool.<br />Discussion groups held with Somali teenage boys and those involved with Liverpool Reads.<br />Recruited them as ambassadors.<br />50% of audience were from the Somali community.<br />Created a relationship between Bluecoat and Somali community which is ongoing with ambassadors working front of house.<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    11. 11. Student ambassadors at the LSO - Pulse<br />Seven Reasons to become a Pulse Ambassador<br />You need to buy pasta…On average, each student ticket saves a 46%<br />Save on the price, not the experience.. free drink and programme and we try and make sure you’re next to your friends.  <br />Open closed doors. Opportunities to meet the artists, watch the LSO rehearse, backstage tours<br />Keep your finger on the pulse. A unique online experience that allows you to shape the events, ideas and initiatives of pulse<br />We don't think a free pen is enough. A range of exclusive rewards such as LSO Live CDs, Barbican vouchers and concert tickets for our ambassadors<br />Keep your eye on the prize. Earn experiences of a lifetime, like meeting some of the biggest names in music, or joining the LSO in Paris...<br />And, finally, with the other eye on the future... An unparalleled experience for your CV that employers will value highly<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    12. 12. Membership schemes<br />Membership schemes are diverse<br />Who joins these schemes?<br />Members’ motivations<br />Material<br />Hedonic<br />Aesthetic<br />Achievement orientated<br />Social<br />Altruistic <br />Self identification<br />Status<br />Ideological commitment<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    13. 13. Maintaining relationships<br />Need a changing product that retains interest and an attractive membership package<br />Communicate regularly and appropriately with your members<br />Segment your membership base<br />Personalise your communications<br />Be clear about what you want from members<br />Give them insights into what you do and how you use donations<br />Ask them to volunteer, upgrade membership and pay by direct debit<br />Talk to your members<br />Find out why people lapse<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    14. 14. Roundhouse Membership Levels<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />BECOME A FAN MEMBER £40 <br />Priority booking/advance notice when available <br />No online booking fees on 10 tickets per year <br />What’s On brochures posted to you <br />Exclusive news updates by email <br />Four vouchers for 10% discount on a two-course meal for one at Made In Camden <br />BECOME A HEADLINER MEMBER £150 Plus…<br />Free Members’ Bar access for you and a guest<br />Free Members’ Cloakroom use for you and a guest<br />Quarterly supporters’ news update <br />Access to members’ area on the Roundhouse website <br />Six vouchers for 10% discount on a two-course meal for one at Made In Camden  <br />BECOME A LEGEND MEMBER £1500<br />
    15. 15. Families as Testers: Osterley Park and House (National Trust London Voices)<br />Road testing of prototype versions of final interpretation:<br />Testing a prototype of the Osterley Compass to check the compass was easy to understand and use. <br />Trying out an interactive puppet booth at Osterley to discover how families connected this imaginative experience with their visit to the historic rooms. <br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br /><ul><li>The tester role works well with families you have a longer term relationship with a place and one off family visitors. People feel incredibly valued to be asked to try things out for you and generally jump at the opportunity!</li></li></ul><li>Top tips<br />Keep it strategic<br />integrated into your core mission and activities<br />Resource activity appropriately<br />Measure the return on investment<br />Be realistic<br />Keep it simple for your visitors<br />Make it a dialogue<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    16. 16. Resources<br />Membership Management Forumwww.membershipmanagementforum.org<br />British Association of Friends of Museumswww.bafm.org.uk<br />Audiences London’s resources www.audienceslondon.org<br />A practical guide to working with arts ambassadors available at www.artscouncil.org.uk<br />www.londonvoicesproject.org.uk<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />
    17. 17. Thank you…<br />www.audienceslondon.org<br />penny@audienceslondon.org<br />(c) Audiences London 2011<br />

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