The Indian Mobile Consumer

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Discussing the Demographics and Psychographics of the Indian Mobile Phone Consumer

Discussing the Demographics and Psychographics of the Indian Mobile Phone Consumer

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  • Data in here is Dated at May 2009. The subscription numbers have gone up to 525 million (January 2010) since then and the mobile penetration is 45%. The Mobile usage status could have changed with the coming of the 1 paise tariff plans. There is no definitive data yet on the break up of data on usage.

Transcript

  • 1. The Indian Mobile Phone ConsumerDemographics, Psychographics and Usage studies
    Findings from survey by JUXT Consulting
  • 2. The Big Picture
    • There were 250 mn* ‘distinct’ and ‘active’ mobile users in India as of end May 2009, i.e., 22% of all Indians are mobile**
    • 3. With an avg. of 1.3 connections per user, the total ‘active’ mobile connections in India are 343 mn***
    Current Mobile Usage Status in India
    All Mobile Connections in India
    343 million
    Rural Mobile Connections
    108 million
    Urban Mobile Connections
    235 million
    1.5 connections per user (avg)
    1.1 connections per user (avg)
    Rural Mobile Users
    95 million
    Urban Mobile Users
    155 million
    2.8 users per household (avg)
    1.5 users per household (avg)
    Rural Households with Mobile Phone Users
    62 million
    Urban Households with Mobile Phone Users
    55 million
    ** Indian population taken at approx. 1,159 million - NSSO/Census data projected for 2009 by Indicus Analytics. *** TRAI claimed 398 mn mobile connections as of end May 2009
  • 4. DemographicsThe Nuts & Bolts
    • While almost half of all urban Indians are mobile, only 1 in 10 rural Indians are mobile
    • 5. 25-35 years is the single largest mobile user age group. However, 19-24 years ones show the highest ‘penetration’ as well as the highest ‘propensity’ to own mobile phones
    • 6. Only 1 in 5 mobile Indian is a woman
    • 7. While 1 in 3 Indian men are mobile, only 1 in 10 Indian women are
  • DemographicsThe Nuts & Bolts
    • North zone is the single largest mobile region, though mobile penetration is highest in East zone
    • 8. 2 out of 3 mobile users are ‘unmarried singles’ – when almost half of all Indians are married
    • 9. Students form the largest occupational group of mobile users, followed by self-employed
    • 10. Average monthly household income of mobile user is 2.3 times that of mobile non-users
  • DemographicsA ‘topsy-turvy’ consumer pyramid?
    • SEC ‘C’ is the largest socio-economic groups of mobile users, followed very closely by SEC ‘B’
    • 11. Interestingly, SEC ‘E’ forms almost as big a base of mobile users as SEC ‘A’
    • 12. SEC ‘B’ and ‘A’ are the most mobile penetrated SEC groups
    • 13. Ironically, SEC ‘R1’, comprising the most affluent rural Indians, is less penetrated than SEC ‘E’, the poorest urban Indians
  • DemographicsA Glimpse By Players….
    • Reliance GSM has the most ‘male’ skew in the user base, Spice the least
    • 14. Reliance, Tata Indicom and MTNL have relatively more ‘mature’ user profiles in age
    • 15. BSNL, Idea, Spice and Aircel have relatively higher proportion of their users coming from smaller ‘tier 4’ districts. Tata Indicom, Reliance CDMA and Vodafone have relatively more coming from biggest ‘tier 1’ districts
  • DemographicsA Glimpse By Players….
    • Aircel has the highest relative ‘rural’ skew in its user base, followed by Reliance GSM and Spice. BSNL, Reliance CDMA and Tata Indicom have the highest relative ‘urban’ skew
    • 16. MTNL, BSNL and Loop Mobile have the highest proportion of SEC ‘A’ and ‘B’ among their user base. MTNL and Loop Mobile ones are the relatively most well-off in terms of (claimed) incomes
  • Psychographics*Techno-graphics & Aspirations
    • Mobile phone tops the urban mobile user’s list of ‘absolute necessities of life’
    • 17. More of them associate ‘role of technology’ with ‘entertainment’ than with ‘socialization’. They associate TV more with ‘entertainment’ and ‘mobile phone’ more with ‘staying connected’
    • 18. 1 in 4 is a ‘gadget freak’ and 1 in 5 looks for ‘style’
    • 19. Only 1 in 6 buys ‘proactively’ to upgrade products/lifestyle, rest are ‘reactive’ buyers
  • Psychographics*Techno-graphics & Aspirations
    • 1 in 10 gives highest importance to ‘price’ and 1 in 5 to ‘brand image’
    • 20. ‘Money’ is the top current priority of more of them. ‘Education’ & ‘Family’ come 2nd and 3rd
    • 21. They are highly ‘realistic’ in their desires. More of them will settle for: a monthly family income of Rs. 25,000, a small car, a saving bank balance of Rs.1 lakh and an assured retirement income of Rs.10,000 a month
    * Urban mobile users only. Findings representative of 80% of all urban mobile users
  • 22. Psychographics*Lifestyle Interests & Preferences
    • ‘Western casual’ is the most preferred clothing among male users, ‘Indian traditional’ among females
    • 23. ‘Indian classical’ is the second most preferred music type after ‘Indian film music’
    • 24. ‘Romantic’ and ‘Action’ movies are clearly more preferred over all other movie types
    • 25. ‘South Indian’ and ‘Street Food’ are their most popular food typesafter ‘Home cooked food’
  • Psychographics*Lifestyle Interests & Preferences
    • More of them indulge in ‘indoor’ entertainment than ‘outdoor’ entertainment
    • 26. ‘Chatting on phone’ is their most popular way of spending time with their friends
    • 27. ‘Listening to music’ is the biggest hobby among them, followed by ‘gaming’
    • 28. ‘Getting close to nature’ is the more popular type of vacation amongst them
    * Urban mobile users only. Findings representative of 80% of all urban mobile users
  • 29. Usage GraphicsMobile Service-Usage
    • 2 out of 3 urban mobile users also have a landline phone at home
    • 30. Average ‘mobile connections’ per urban household is 4.3 while in rural households it is 1.7
    • 31. 93% of the currently ‘most used’ connections are ‘prepaid’, with almost half bought from an MBO
    • 32. 1 in 5 uses internet on mobile (WAP/GPRS/EDGE). Over half of all ‘mobile internet users’ go online daily
  • Usage GraphicsMobile Service-Usage
    • 2/3rd have used the 5/10 digit short codes, most in response to reality shows on TV
    • 33. 4 out of 5 mobile users are either open, or neutral, to receiving ads on their mobile phones
    • 34. 30% have registered on DND/DNCR list. But over 50% of them still receive ad/solicitation calls
    * Urban mobile users only. Findings representative of 84% of all urban mobile users
  • 35. Usage GraphicsMobile Service-Brands
    • In terms of ‘user share’ (most used connection), Airtel leads the pack with 26%, followed by Reliance and Vodafone
    • 36. In terms of ‘connection share’ (multiple connections), Reliance leads the pack with 35% share, followed by Airtel and Vodafone
    • 37. Airtel is the most ‘top of mind’ recalled mobile service brand, followed by Reliance. Airtel is also the ‘most intend to use’ brand for next connection, followed closely by Vodafone
  • Usage GraphicsMobile Service-Brands
    • While 3 out of 4 mobile users will continue with their current operator, only half are highly satisfied or will recommend their service provider to the others
    • 38. Network strength, coverage and tariff plans are the 3 most satisfying factors in current usage, while poor customer care service, tariff plans and lack of voice clarity are the 3 most dissatisfying factors
    • 39. ‘Weak network strength’ is the clear biggest reason to consider switching connection (60%)
    * Urban mobile users only. Findings representative of 84% of all urban mobile users
  • 40. Usage GraphicsMobile Service-Usage
    • Average ‘active’ mobile phones per person is 1.5,and per urban household is 2.8
    • 41. 85% active mobile handsets have a ‘color screen’, only about 5% a ‘touch screen’
    • 42. 3 out of 4 mobile users ‘play games’ on their mobile handsets. Listening to FM radio is the second most popular non-communication activity on mobiles
  • Usage GraphicsMobile Service-Usage
    • Only half bought their current handset from their own money, 1 in 5 got it as a ‘gift’
    • 43. Over half have bought their handsets at an MBO, only 1 in 8 bought it ‘bundled’ with their connection
    • 44. Camera quality, price, battery life and sound clarity are the most important features looked at while purchasing the handset
    * Urban mobile users only. Findings representative of 84% of all urban mobile users
  • 45. Usage-graphics*Mobile Handset - Brands
    • On ‘user share’ (most used handset), Nokia leads the pack at 50%, followed by LG and Samsung
    • 46. In terms of ‘handset share’ (multiple handsets), Nokia leads the pack with 62% share
    • 47. Nokia is the most ‘top of mind’ recalled handset brand. LG, Samsung and Sony Ericsson follow distantly
  • Usage-graphics*Mobile Handset - Brands
    • Nokia is also the clear favorite ‘most intend to use’ brand for next handset purchase, followed by a distant Sony Ericsson
    • 48. Price, brand and battery life/talk time are the 3 most satisfying factors in current handset usage, while battery life, sound quality and limited memory are the 3 most dissatisfying factors
    • 49. Having ‘more up-to-date features’ is the biggest reason to consider switching to a new set (53%)
    * Urban mobile users only. Findings representative of 84% of all urban mobile users
  • 50. The Urban Indian Mobile Phone ConsumerDemographics and Psychographics
    Findings from survey by JUXT Consulting
  • 51. ‘New’ Urban Indian Consumer Pyramid
    (Based on redefining SECs by the highest education and occupation level among all members in the household and not just of chief wage earner)
    159 million
    47%
    Tier 3
    The Underprivileged
    (39 million families)
    79 million
    23%
    (17 million families)
    Tier 2
    The Aspiring Class
    SEC A
    SEC B
    SEC D
    SEC E
    SEC C
    105 million
    Tier 1
    The Consuming Class
    30%
    (22 million families)
    * NSSO/Census data projected for 2009 by Indicus Analytics
    * Total – 343 million individuals (77 million urban families)
  • 52. Demographic Distinctions*
    • If over half of all SEC ‘A’ live in ‘metros’, then half of all SEC ‘E’ also live in metros
    • 53. Less than 1 in 10 SEC ‘A’ prefer to read in English (and 1 in 50 SEC ‘B’)
  • Demographic Distinctions*
    • If 1 in 3 SEC ‘B’ individuals are graduates, so are 1 in 5 SEC ‘C’ and ‘D’ individuals
    • 54. SEC ‘E’ shows the highest relative proportion of female chief wage earners at 5% (SEC ‘A’ has the lowest)
    • 55. SEC ‘A’ has the highest relative proportion of ‘married with children’ individuals
    * Findings representative of all the 343 million urban individuals
  • 56. Economic Distinctions*
    • Only 1 in 3 SEC ‘A’ comes from Rs.25,000 or above monthly income household
    • 57. Only 1 in 3 SEC ‘A’ individual posses a credit card (I in 5 SEC ‘C’ and ‘D’ also do)
    • 58. 97% SEC ‘A’ homes have a Color TV and 80% a Fridge, only 25% have a Credit card , 25% a Car, 15% an AC, 16% a Laptop, 11% a Medical Insurance and 5% own shares
  • Economic Distinctions*
    • Less than 1% SEC ‘D’ homes have a Car, but 7% own a Washing Machine, 23% a Fridge, 55% have a Bank Account, 57% own a house and 75% own a Color TV
    • 59. If less than 1% SEC ‘C’ have an internet connection at home, only 11% SEC ‘A’ have an internet connection at home
    * Findings representative of all the 343 million urban individuals
  • 60. Psychographic Distinctions*
    • If incomes increase by 20-30%, more of SEC ‘A’ , ‘B’ and ‘C’ will improve ‘quality’ of consumption. SEC ‘D’ and ‘E’ will improve ‘quantity’ of consumption
    • 61. SEC ‘A’ individuals tend to spend their spare time relatively more ‘together as a family’, SEC ‘E’ do so the least
    * Findings representative of 85% of the 259 million 13 year & plus urban individuals
  • 62. Psychographic Distinctions*
    • SEC ‘A’ and ‘B’ relate to role of TV in life more in terms of ‘entertainment’ and ‘source of information’. SEC ‘C’, ‘D’ and ‘E’ relate it with ‘entertainment’ and ‘pass spare time’
    • 63. SEC ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘C’ relate benefits of internet more with ‘learning’ and ‘staying updated’, SEC ‘D’ and ‘E’ relate it with ‘entertainment’ more
  • Psychographic Distinctions*
    • For SEC ‘A’ and ‘B’ romance is more a long-term emotional bonding, for SEC ‘C’ and ‘E’ its is a first step towards marriage and for SEC ‘D’ more of a short-term relationship
    • 64. While SEC ‘A’ and ‘B’ see role of sex in life more as an ‘essential part of married life’, SEC ‘C’, ‘D’ and ‘E’ see it more as an ‘essential part of romantic life’
    • 65. Higher proportion of SEC ‘A’ and ‘B’ individuals find ‘pre-marital sex’ unacceptable under any circumstances. In comparison, SEC ‘C’, ‘D’ and ‘E’ have a more liberal view of pre-marital sex
  • Psychographic Distinctions*
    • While majority of SEC ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘C’ individuals prefer to read ‘self-improvement’ books the most, more of SEC ‘D’ and ‘E’ ones prefer to read ‘novels’ and ‘comics’
    • 66. Preferred clothing of SEC ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘C’ males is ‘western casual’ followed by ‘western formals’. For SEC ‘D’ and ‘E’ it is ‘western casuals’ followed by ‘Indian traditional’
    * Findings representative of 85% of the 259 million 13 year & plus urban individuals
  • 67. Psychographic Distinctions*
    • SEC ‘A’ and ‘B’ individuals are members of professional associations and community clubs more. SEC ‘C’, ‘D’ and ‘E’ are members of spiritual and religious groups more
    • 68. Yet SEC ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘C’ individuals tend to identify themselves as ‘religious’ more than SEC ‘D’ and ‘E’ individuals do
    * Findings representative of 85% of the 259 million 13 year & plus urban individuals
  • 69. Psychographic Distinctions*
    • While SEC ‘C’ show the lowest tendency to keep ‘pets’ in the house, SEC ‘E’ show the tendency to keep the widest variety of pets in their houses
    • 70. For SEC ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘C’ individuals, the topmost current priorities are ‘money’ and ‘family’. For SEC ‘D’ and ‘E’ ones it is ‘money’ and ‘education’
    * Findings representative of 85% of the 259 million 13 year & plus urban individuals