Innovation in a Flat World - Lessons from India
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Innovation in a Flat World - Lessons from India

on

  • 4,941 views

My presentation at the 15th Management Circle Innovation Conference, Munich, Germany, Nov 5-6. Unfortunately, I was not able to travel and present this talk in person, but presented the key topics ...

My presentation at the 15th Management Circle Innovation Conference, Munich, Germany, Nov 5-6. Unfortunately, I was not able to travel and present this talk in person, but presented the key topics from it in a Skype chat with Prof. Oliver Gassmann, University of St. Gallen, and Chair for this conference

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,941
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
4,773
Embed Views
168

Actions

Likes
14
Downloads
66
Comments
3

7 Embeds 168

http://www.scoop.it 124
http://www.linkedin.com 35
http://www.google.com 3
https://www.linkedin.com 3
http://agb.6 1
http://pulse.me&_=1383811544293 HTTP 1
https://twitter.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

13 of 3 Post a comment

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • PLZ.forget whichcountry what doesnt want we must stick to remote health care otherwise crowding will lead to unattended killing of aspirants of health care
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • @PrabhakerPanditiPMPS Thanks Prabhaker. I agree with you - the whole thing about Reverse Innovation is still a bit too new (and on Open Innovation in India is even more of an idea at this point). End of the day, it is the mankind and the biosphere that should benefit and not a few nations that deny other developing nations the right to improve themselves...
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • @Tathagat:
    Very informative. The examples of reverse innovation are interesting and it remains to be seen how they fare in the global market place. This is exactly the promise of the 'flat world' phenomena - use ideas from across the planet to make this a better world...for all of mankind.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Innovation in a Flat World - Lessons from India Innovation in a Flat World - Lessons from India Presentation Transcript

    • Innova&on  in  a  Flat  World:   Lessons  from  India   Tathagat  Varma,   VP,  Strategic  Process  Innova2ons,   Innova2on  Labs,  [24]7  Customer,  Inc  
    • India Yesterday vs. India Today #54  Governance   #1  Milk  Producer,  Two-­‐ wheeler,  IT  Outsourcing   Country,  Bollywood,  Gold   consumer,     #94  Corrup<on  Percep<on   Index   #97  Educa<on   #100  Personal  Freedom   #104  Entrepreneurship  &   Opportunity   #106:  Prosperity  Index   #109  Health   #120  Safety  &  Security   #134  Ease  of  Doing  Business   OR   AND   #2  Wheat,  Rice,  Mobile   Users,  Labor  force,   Roadways,  Cement,  CoYon,   Potato,  Sugarcane,  Tea,   Students  studying  abroad     #3  Internet  Users,  Coal,  GDP   (PPP);  #4  Railways,  Steel;  #5   Heavy  Truck,  Wind  power;  #6   Car  maker,  Electricity   Producer  
    • …and India Tomorrow?
    • India’s Innovation Spectrum IT   Outsourcing-­‐ led   Innova&on   Glocaliza&on   “Jugaad”   Innova&on   “India-­‐scale”   Innova&on   Reverse   Innova&on   New  to  the   World  
    • IT Outsourcing-led Innovation Intui<ve  Customer  Experiences.   2.5  Billion  <mes  a  year.     [24]7  Customer,  Inc.  
    • Glocalization Globaliza<on  +  localiza&on   Well-­‐established  examples  in  India   Explainable,  even  if  not  always  repeatable  
    • “Jugaad” Grassroots  approach   to  solve  daily-­‐life   problems   Simple,  Quick,   Frugal,  Workaround   Might  not  be   elegant,  sustainable   or  scalable!   hYp://jugaadinnova<on.com/infographics/    
    • A Billion Examples of Jugaad…but only a few become big!
    • Missed-call – a “Zero Billion $” Idea? 96%  of  India’s  900m  user  give  missed-­‐call  –  India’s  zero-­‐cost   Morse-­‐code  for  rou<ne  ‘updates’  like  ‘arrived  safely’,  or  ‘call  me   back’,  etc.     Industry  es<mates  loss  of  revenue  between  20%  to  30%  due  to   missed  calls   However,  it  is  a   $100m+   business  
    • For “India-scale” Problems… 1.2Billion+  People   Largest  democracy   30%  <$1.25/day  and  97%  <$5/day   70%  live  in  rural  areas   31%  use  improved  sanita<on  (2008)   0.6  Doctors  per  1000  (#124)   Largest  popula<on  of  blind   …and  many,  many  more!  
    • … “India-scale” Innovations Polio  Eradica<on   Jaipur  Foot   Sanitary  Napkin  King!   Educa<on  for  underprivileged   Mid-­‐day  Meal  Scheme   Aravind  Eye  Care  System   UID  “Aadhar”  Card  Project   Maha  Kumbh  Mela   …and  many,  many  more!  
    • India vs. Polio Till  2009:  India   accounted  for  50%   cases   13  Jan  2011:  last   recorded  case   hYp://www.cdc.gov/polio/progress/     hYp://www.unicef.org/india/Polio_Booklet-­‐final_(22-­‐02-­‐2012)V3.pdf    
    • World’s Largest Organization  for the Disabled Since  1975,  over  1.3  million  beneficiaries,  mostly  in   India  and  also  in  26  countries  of  Asia,  Africa  and  La<n   America.   Rapid  fitment  —  limbs,  aids,  etc  generally  fiRed  in   one  to  three  days.  All  ar<ficial  limbs  and  other  aids   and  appliances  given  totally  free  of  charge.  
    • India’s Sanitary Napkin King!!! Arumugam  Muruganantham,  a  school  dropout  who  wants   to  give  dignity  to  rural  women   Only  2%  of   rural  women   use  sanitary   napkin   Generates  local   He  became  first   630+  machines   employment;   man  to  wear   installed  across   Cost  per   sanitary   23  states  and  6   napkin:   napkin…   countries   0.02-­‐0.03  US$  
    • “Every Child in School and Learning Well”  Established  in  1994  to  provide  pre-­‐school  educa<on  to  the   children  in  the  slums  of  Mumbai  city.   Pratham  is  the  largest  NGO  working  to  provide  quality   educa&on  to  the  underprivileged  children  of  India.      
    • •  In June 2000, started   mid-day meal program in Bangalore by feeding 1500 children in 5 schools •  1.37m children everyday Objectives of the mid-day meal scheme - avoid classroom hunger, - increase school enrolment, - increase school attendance - improve socialization among castes  - address malnutrition &  - empower women through employment Today, India's midday meal scheme is the largest school lunch program in the world, reaching out to nearly 120 million children in the country.
    • Aravind Eye Care System Founded  by  Dr.  Venkataswamy   in  1976.  Now  300+  hospital   network   Has  seen  32m+  pa&ents  and   done  4m+  surgeries   Each  year,  Aravind  does  60%   as  many  eye  surgeries  as  the   UK’s  NHS,  at   one-­‐thousandth  of  the  cost.   “My goal is to spread the Aravind model to every nook and corner of India, Asia, and Africa; wherever there is blindness, we want to offer hope.Tell me, what is this concept of franchising? Can’t we do what McDonald’s and Burger King have done?” —Dr.V, 1993
    • “Aadhar” – Unique Id for India’s 1.2 Billion! To  empower  residents  of  India  with  a  unique   iden2ty  and  a  digital  plaForm  to  authen2cate   any2me,  anywhere.   Cost  per   card:   $3-­‐5   Cost  to   ci<zens:   Free  
    • Maha Kumbh Mela 2013 Largest  peaceful   gathering  of  mankind   every  12  years   58  sq.  kms  campus   100m+  pilgrims  visited   in  2013   30m+  took  dip  on  10   Feb  2013   No  major  disease   outbreak!  
    • Reverse Innovation: Create far from home, win everywhere! Microso_  is  crea<ng  new  phone  app  services  for  "dumb"  phones  which  allow  users  with  exis<ng,  non-­‐ smartphone  devices  to  access  Web  sites  such  as  TwiYer,  Facebook.  Built  for  markets  in  India  and  South  Africa,   there  is  surprising  poten<al  for  these  apps  as  a  low-­‐cost  cloud  compu<ng  plaxorm.   GE  is  now  selling  an  ultra-­‐portable  electrocardiograph  machine  in  the  U.S.  at  an  80%  markdown  for  similar   products.  The  machine  was  originally  built  by  GE  Healthcare  for  doctors  in  India  and  China.   Tata  Motors  is  planning  to  sell  an  upgraded  version  of  the  Tata  Nano  in  western  markets;  it's  called  Tata  Europa.   Procter  &  Gamble  found  that  a  honey-­‐based  cold  remedy  created  for  Mexico  also  had  a  profitable  market  in   Europe  and  the  United  States.   Nestlé  learned  that  it  could  sell  its  low-­‐cost,  low-­‐fat  dried  noodles  originally  created  for  rural  India  and  posi<on   the  same  product  as  a  healthy  alterna<ve  in  Australia  and  New  Zealand   In  China  and  India,  Harman  designed  from  scratch  a  completely  new  infotainment  system  for  emerging  markets   with  func<onality  similar  to  their  high-­‐end  products  at  half  the  price  and  one-­‐third  the  cost.  It  has  generated   more  than  $3  billion  in  new  business.     Mahindra  Tractors  developed  smaller  tractors  for  small  <me  farmers  across  the  world  and  have  succeeded   tremendously  from  it  based  on  their  India  model     Narayana  Hridayalaya  has  developed  the  process  for  low  cost  cardiac  surgery  and  is  now  se{ng  up  hospitals   close  to  the  USA  to  deliver  lower  cost  healthcare  based  on  the  model  they  perfected  in  India.  
    • Key Takeaways Outsourcing  and  glocaliza&on  have  opened  up  India  markets   for  MNCs  beyond  just  cost  advantages   Jugaad  reflects  day-­‐to-­‐day  constraints  =  ideas  for  future?   India-­‐scale  problems  test  every  aspect  of  design,   development  and  delivery   Local  innova<ons  from  MNCs  and  startups  could  be  eventually   funneled  back  as  reverse  innova&on  for  global  markets  
    • References •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  40 Years of Innovation in India, Harsh Wardhan Gupta, http://www.ipfonline.com/IPFCONTENT/articles/technical-articles/40-years-of-innovation-in-india-1.php 9 Talks about Innovation In India, TED, http://blog.ted.com/2012/11/13/9-talks-about-innovation-in-india/ Rs. 500-cr missed call biz in India: Banks, FMCG cos, political parties use this tool for customer feedback, Joji Thomas and Harsimran Julka, http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2013-01-26/news/36564149_1_ceo-vishwanath-alluri-political-parties-imimobile http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missed_call http://techcrunch.com/2013/03/06/zipdial-has-turned-400m-missed-calls-into-moneymaking-connections/ India: On the Path of Innovation, Shivkamal, http://www.ibef.org/download%5Ccover_story_Innovation_131107.pdf http://hbr.org/2012/04/a-reverse-innovation-playbook/ http://www.fastcompany.com/1738533/10-most-innovative-companies-india http://pratham.org http://www.akshayapatra.org/ http://www.transparency.org/cpi2012/results http://www.indianexpress.com/news/india-gets-poor-101st-rank-on-global-gender-gap-index/1187096/ http://www.globalslaveryindex.org/report/ http://www.prosperity.com/#!/country/IND
    • Thanks! hYp://managewell.net