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Basketball Stats

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This is a WebQuest that I created as a project for one of my education classes at CSU.

This is a WebQuest that I created as a project for one of my education classes at CSU.

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Basketball Stats Basketball Stats Presentation Transcript

  • Baseball Statistics Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 7th Grade Math Students Designed by Mallory Gerken [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Photo by Flickr: clarkbw
  • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Have you ever watched Baseball? Have you ever watched a sports talk show , and heard the guests predict which team they think is going to win? Have you ever wondered how they come up with those predictions? Well, here is your chance to find out! The Rockies will be playing a home game in the near future, and you and two of your friends have been invited to appear on ESPN’s SportsCenter to debate which team is going to come out on top! You will only have ten minutes on the show, so you need to be ready. Luckily, you have time to do some research before your big debut. During your investigation, you will be able to find facts about both teams, create comparison statements (using ratios, fractions and differences for example) and decide who will do the best. Image by Flickr: Naked Eyes
  • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • In order to prepare for the show, you and your friends need to:
      • Decide which team you want the Rockies to play.
      • Find information on the Rockies as well as the team of your choice.
      • Use the information you have found to create 6 to 10 comparison statements.
      • Create a “Cheat Sheet” showing your 6 to 10 comparison statements and the work you used to create those statements, so that you can use it on ESPN’s SportsCenter. You don’t want to sound boring, so use different types of Comparison Statements!
      • Brush up on the language used by Baseball announcers, you don’t want to sound like you don’t know what you’re talking about! You should include 3 to 5 different Baseball terms.
    • Once you are prepared we will be holding our own special edition of ESPN’s SportsCenter in class. In front of a live audience (the rest of the class), you and your friends will discuss your findings, who you think will win and why!
    Title Image by Flickr: B Tal
  • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • First, you will be assigned to a group of three students. These students will be the friends you will be appearing on ESPN with.
    • You and your group will pick the team that the Rockies will be playing against. A list of teams can be found here . After you pick a team the three of you will have to pick roles; one of you will be the team’s Biggest Fan , one of you the team’s Biggest Critic and the other one of you will be the Reporter . If you click on each one of these roles you will be able to find more information on each to help you choose.
    • After you have picked a team and a role, you will need to find information on your team. You and your group members may also decided to research specific players from each team. You all may want to research the same players, or you can research different players. There will be a lot of information to choose from, so you will need to decide what information is most important for your role.
    • Once you have decided what information you are going to use you will create your “Cheat Sheets.” On one side your “Cheat Sheet” you should have all of the comparison statements that you created. On the other side, you will show the math that you did for each statement.
    • You and your friends will need to brush up on your baseball lingo so that you will be ready for your presentation of your ESPN show.
    • Your debut on ESPN’s SportsCenter. You will go on ESPN with your friends , and using your “Cheat Sheets” discuss which team is going to win. Remember, you will only have ten minutes, so be prepared! You are encouraged to dress up for your part on the day of the big show! Don’t forget to have fun!!
    Image by: Flickr permanently scatterbrained
  • The Reporter - The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A reporter is someone who is neutral, they don’t care which team wins or loses they just care about the facts. A reporter also cares about both sides of a story. Reporters present both sides of the story to the public so that the public can make their own decision. For more information on reporters click here . As a reporter, you will use the information that you find on each team to create unbiased, factual statements. Your statements should not seem like they are making a team look better than they actually are. In an effort to represent both sides, you should have an equal amount of statements for each team. For example, if you have three comparison statements for the Rockies, then you should have three comparison statements for the other team. To do your research and find information on the different teams click here . You may also want to find information on specific players from each team, you will want to use the search by team, team rosters option. Some of the abbreviations that these sites use can be confusing, so you will want to have a list of what the abbreviations mean. This should give you all of the information that you need to create your “Cheat Sheet.” Remember, you want your comparison statements to be fair to both sides! Don’t forget to brush up on your lingo for your debut on ESPN! Image b y: Flickr mjkmjk
  • The Biggest Fan - The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] As the Biggest Fan of the team that you and your group members chose, you will want your team to look good no matter what. To do this, you will want to create comparison statements that either make your team look good, or make the Rockies look bad. For example: “The Dodgers will beat the Rockies because the Dodgers win 85% of the time at home.” First, you will need to do some research on both your team and the Rockies. To find information on both teams, click here . You may also want to include information on specific players from each team, you will want to use the search by team, team rosters option. Some of the abbreviations that these sites use can be confusing, so you will want to have a list of what the abbreviations mean. This should give you all of the information that you need to create your “Cheat Sheet.” Remember, you want your comparison statements to make you team look like it will win! Don’t forget to brush up on your lingo for your debut on ESPN! Image by: Flickr albakker
  • The Biggest Critic - The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] As the Biggest Critic of the team that you and your group members chose, you will want your team to look bad no matter what. To do this, you will want to create comparison statements that either make your team look bad, or make the Rockies look good. For example: “The Rockies will beat the Dodgers because the Rockies win 85% of the time at home.” First, you will need to do some research on both your team and the Rockies. To find information on both teams, click here . You may also want to include information on specific players from each team, you will want to use the search by team, team rosters option. Some of the abbreviations that these sites use can be confusing, so you will want to have a list of what the abbreviations mean. This should give you all of the information that you need to create your “Cheat Sheet.” Remember, you want your comparison statements to make you team look like it will lose! Don’t forget to brush up on your lingo for your debut on ESPN! Image by: Flickr fiveforefun
  • Evaluation Rubric: ESPN SportsCenter Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Evaluation Rubric: Cheat Sheet Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Volume Volume often too soft to be heard by all audience members. Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members at least 80% of the time. Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members at least 90% of the time. Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members throughout the presentation. Preparedness Student does not seem at all prepared to present. The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. Number of Comparison Statements Student has 4 or fewer Comparison Statements. Student has 4 to 6 Comparison Statements. Student has 6 to 10 Comparison Statements. Student has 10 or more Comparison Statements Use of Baseball Lingo Student only uses 1 Baseball term, or student doesn’t use any baseball terms. Student uses 2 to 3 Baseball terms. Student uses 3 to 5 Baseball terms. Student uses 5 or more Baseball terms. Role Student doesn’t understand role at all, or student doesn’t play their role at any point in the presentation. Student doesn’t fully understand role, or student plays role for less than half of the presentation. Student correctly understands role, and plays that role for the majority of the presentation. Student correctly understands role and plays that role throughout presentation. Attire (Extra Credit) Casual business attire, but wore sneakers or seemed somewhat wrinkled. Student dressed in business attire, very professional look
  • Evaluation Rubric: Cheat Sheet Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Evaluation Rubric: ESPN SportsCenter Points ESPN SportsCenter : 20 points Cheat Sheet : 16 points Total: 36 points Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Comparison Statements Student doesn’t have a Cheat Sheet, or writing is illegible. Student has a Cheat Sheet, but has only written a few statements, or handwriting is sloppy and hard to read. Student has a Cheat Sheet, but has not written all statements, or handwriting is slightly sloppy. Student has a Cheat Sheet and has written all statements clearly. Math Student doesn’t show work, or all work is incorrect. Student shows work, but not all work is correct and work is not easy to follow. Student shows work and all work is correct, but not easy to follow. Or, Student shows work and work is easy to follow, but not all work is correct. Student shows work and all work is correct and easy to follow. Accuracy of Comparison Statements None of the statements correctly reflect the student’s role. Less than half, but at least a few, of statements correctly reflect student’s role. Or, only a few statements correctly reflect student’s role. More than half, but not all, of statements correctly reflect the student’s role. Or, not all statements correctly reflect student’s role. All statements correctly reflect the student’s role. Types of Comparison Statements Student only uses 1 type of Comparison Statement. Student uses 2 different types of Comparison Statements. Student uses 3 different types of Comparison Statements. Student uses 4 different types of Comparison Statements.
  • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • After completing this WebQuest, you should:
      • Have a better understanding of how the guests on ESPN’s SportsCenter are able to predict which team is going to win a Baseball game.
      • Be able to decide what information best fits your point of view or goal.
      • Be able to use information to create comparison statements that support your point of view or goal.
      • Be able to argue your point of view using comparison statements and other information that you have gathered.
      • Be able to find information on the internet to help you do research.
    Image by Flickr: Tony the Misfit
  • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] All images were found on Flickr . By each image I listed the user’s screen name, so you can go to Flickr and search for other images by that user. This WebQuest was created from a template found on The WebQuest Page . To find up-to-date templates and other information on WebQuests, please visit this site. Other WebQuests can be found at The WebQuest Slideshare Group . Image by: Flickr Travis Truman
  • Baseball Statistics (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 7th Grade Math Designed by Mallory Gerken [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Photo by: Flickr clarkbw
  • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed as a project for my EDUC 331 class, Education and Technology. While developing this lesson, I was working in the 7 th grade math classroom at Lesher Junior High. I developed this lesson with those students in mind, however, I feel that this lesson can be used with any group of students at the 7 th grade level. This lesson should be taught to students who are already familiar with ratios, percents, fractions, differences and comparison statements. This lesson supplies students with raw data that they will then use to create comparison statements. Each student is playing a different role, so each student will choose different data for their comparison statements in order to reflect their role. This lesson teaches the students that different statements can be used to reflect different points of view, as well as how to create statements that reflect their own point of view. In addition, this lesson teaches students the ability to use raw data to create different statistics in the form of comparison statements. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Image by Flickr: Naked Eyes
  • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This Lesson is anchored in 7 th grade mathematics, and involves language arts to a lesser extent. Depending on how courses are structured at particular districts and institutions this lesson could be taught at the 6 th grade level as well. The students will need to know: how to create ratios; how to find differences; how to find percents; how to compare to objects, such as baseball teams, using the afore mentioned mathematical techniques. It would also be helpful to students to have an understanding of the concept of point of view. Having a brief understanding of baseball could be helpful to students as well. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Image by: Flickr Jose Kevo
  • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Math Standards Addressed
    • Standard 1.1
      • Demonstrate meanings for integers, rational numbers, percents, exponents, square roots, and pi (B ) use physical materials and technology in problem-solving situations
    • Standard 1.4
      • Use the relationships among fractions, decimals, and percents, include the concepts of ratio and proportion, in problem-solving situations
    • Standard 1.5
      • Develop, test, and explain conjectures about properties of integers and rational numbers
    • Standard 2.1
      • Represent, describe, and analyze patterns and relationships using tables, graphs, verbal rules, and standard algebraic notation
    • Standard 6.1
      • Use models to explain how ratios, proportions, and percents can be used to solve real-world problems
    • In addition, students will learn critical thinking skills, comparison, teamwork skills, as well as how to creatively present their findings. Students will also be encouraged to use inference-making skills as well as observation and categorization while listening to their classmates present their final products. For example, students will infer which role each presenter is playing.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is a multi-day lesson plan, the length of which varies depending on how long each period is. I envision students needing one to two days to create their comparison statements and organize their scripts for their ESPN presentation. An additional half day to a full day will then be spent on presentations. Students are going to be divided up into groups of three. I recommend that students be divided according to their ability level. By that I mean that each group should contain a student who understands well what comparison statements are and how to make them, a student who understands the concepts fairly well, as well as a student who is struggling with these concepts. I would encourage students to ask their group-mates for help. Also, it would be a good idea to encourage students to check their group-mates’ work to make sure that everyone is correct. This lesson would be easier for a teacher who has experience getting students to role play, as the final product is a role play. It could also be helpful for a teacher to have experience with group work, because the majority of the time students will be working in groups. That being said, I feel that this lesson would be fairly easy to conduct for any level of teacher. The Process (Teacher) Continued Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • The Process Continued (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • First, students will be assigned to groups of three.
    • Students will then pick the team that they want the Rockies to play against. A list of teams can be found here . After students have picked a team they will then have to pick roles; one student will be the team’s Biggest Fan , one the team’s Biggest Critic and the other student will be the Reporter . If you click on each one of these roles you will be able to find more information on each to.
    • After students have picked a team and a role, they will need to find information on their team. Each group may also decide to research specific players from each team. There will be a lot of information to choose from, so students will need to decide what information is most important for their role. Some students may need help deciding what information to use.
    • Once students have decided what information they are going to use they will create their “Cheat Sheets.” On one side the “Cheat Sheet” students should have all of their comparison statements. On the other side, students should show the math they did for each statement.
    • Students will then need to prepare for their presentations. They should use this time to research baseball lingo, and to make scripts for their presentations.
    • The students debut on ESPN’s SportsCenter. Students will go on ESPN with their other group members, and using their “Cheat Sheets” and scripts, they will discuss which team is going to win. Presentations should last about ten minutes for each team. Students are encouraged to dress up for their part on the day of their presentation.
    • The Process (Teacher)
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Teachers will need access to a computer lab for this lesson, because each student will do their own investigations on their chosen team.
    • Websites used by this lesson:
    • http://mlb.mlb.com/team/index.jsp
      • This website lists all the teams in the MLB, so that students will be able to choose a team.
    • http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/standings/index.jsp?ymd=20071031
      • This website gives information on the teams for the students to figure their stats. I was able to configure the website to show only the information that I felt was relevant to the students.
    • http://www.mlb.com/mlb/players/
      • This website gives information on the players from a specific team so students can figure out stats for specific players.
    • http://www.olmec.org/baseball/glossary.jsp
      • This website lists the abbreviations used in baseball and what they mean so that students won’t be confused when they read the information on MLB website.
    • http://www.free-picks.org/mlb/resource/mlb-baseball-dictionary.php
      • This is a glossary of terms that students should incorporat into the ESPN skits that will be presented.
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reporter
      • This is a wikipedia site that gives students more information on what it means to be a reporter.
    • It should only recuire one teacher to facilitate this lesson. However, if the students and teacher decide that they would like to film their ESPN skits the help of a parent or school IT technician could be needed.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Comparison Statements Student doesn’t have a Cheat Sheet, or writing is illegible. Student has a Cheat Sheet, but has only written a few statements, or handwriting is sloppy and hard to read. Student has a Cheat Sheet, but has not written all statements, or handwriting is slightly sloppy. Student has a Cheat Sheet and has written all statements clearly. Math Student doesn’t show work, or all work is incorrect. Student shows work, but not all work is correct and work is not easy to follow. Student shows work and all work is correct, but not easy to follow. Or, Student shows work and work is easy to follow, but not all work is correct. Student shows work and all work is correct and easy to follow. Accuracy of Comparison Statements None of the statements correctly reflect the student’s role. Less than half, but at least a few, of statements correctly reflect student’s role. Or, only a few statements correctly reflect student’s role. More than half, but not all, of statements correctly reflect the student’s role. Or, not all statements correctly reflect student’s role. All statements correctly reflect the student’s role. Types of Comparison Statements Student only uses 1 type of Comparison Statement. Student uses 2 different types of Comparison Statements. Student uses 3 different types of Comparison Statements. Student uses 4 different types of Comparison Statements. Number of Comparison Statements Student has 4 or fewer Comparison Statements. Student has 4 to 6 Comparison Statements. Student has 6 to 10 Comparison Statements. Student has 10 or more Comparison Statements Role Student doesn’t understand role at all, or student doesn’t play their role at any point in the presentation. Student doesn’t fully understand role, or student plays role for less than half of the presentation. Student correctly understands role, and plays that role for the majority of the presentation. Student correctly understands role and plays that role throughout presentation.
  • Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Have the student click on the word “here” under The Process page. Ask the student to choose a team from one of the teams listed on the website that pops up.
    • Ask the student to pick which role they would like to play for this project. Then have them click on the name of that role under The Process page. For example, if the student chooses to be the reporter say, “Ok, now click where it says Reporter in blue.” You may need to help the student understand what their role is.
      • This will take the student to the Process page for their role.
    • Ask the student to click on the word here at the end of the sentence “First, you will need to do some research on both your team and the Rockies. To find information on both teams, click here .”
      • This will bring up the MLB website that I have modified to show the most relevant information on all of the MLB teams.
    • Have the student look on the list and find their team. You will need to explain to the student what the abbreviations at the top of the list mean. You may also need to describe to the student how this information can be used to compare the two teams.
    • Ask the student what characteristics they would like to use to compare the two teams and help them to create comparison statements using these characteristics.
      • Remind the student that they are playing a role and these comparison statements need to reflect that role. Example: “Is that something that the Biggest Fan of the Dodgers would say? Does that statement make the Dodgers look like they are going to win the game against the Rockies?”
    • Help the students to create their “Cheat Sheet.” It may be helpful to show the student an example of an already completed “Cheat Sheet.”
    • Ask the student what they would like to say if they went on ESPN’s SportsCenter with this information. Ask the student how they would use their comparison statements to show that, for example, the Dodgers are going to win the game.
    • Help the student to work with their group members to create a script for their ESPN skit. Make sure that some of the students own ideas are incorporated into the group script.
      • This is where you could use sentences created by the student in step 7.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is a good capstone lesson for the end of a unit involving ratios, percents, fractions, differences and comparison statements because it incorporates all of these concepts and ideas. This lesson will also give students a chance to work in groups, as well as a chance to turn in a final product that is something other than a test or a worksheet. The majority of grades given in a math classroom are worksheets, quizzes and tests, so this lesson will be something that is fun and different for the students as well as the teachers. It will also give students a chance to express themselves creatively, which is fun for the students and interesting for the teacher! Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Image by Flickr: Tony the Misfit
  • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page All images were found on Flickr . By each image I listed the user’s screen name, so you can go to Flickr and search for other images by that user. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion This WebQuest was created from a template found on The WebQuest Page . To find up-to-date templates and other information on WebQuests, please visit this site. Other WebQuests can be found at The WebQuest Slideshare Group . Image by: Flickr Travis Truman