Pedagogy for all aug 30 2010 supplemental day

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2010.8.30 Cultural Competency and Social Justice Training from ODA

2010.8.30 Cultural Competency and Social Justice Training from ODA

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  • Pedagogy For All Define pedagogy as “the art of teaching.” Read title/quote/continue to slide 2. Background/History: The objective of this training is to assist all staff in both their professional and personal cultural competence growth journey. Four years ago, we began our journey with offering books studies: Why are all the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria ? (for administrators); We Can’t Teach What We Don’t Know (for teachers and administrators); The last two August Learning Improvement Days have been focused on the REACH (Respecting Ethnic and Cultural Heritage) training Perspective Series at Pierce College and at the UW Tacoma. Now, we are continuing our cultural competence training as we focus on our initiative to close the achievement/opportunity gap. As we move forward in our journey, we know that some of us are at different places and encourage each of you to continue to open your minds and hearts to understanding the importance of this work. The most important part of this process will come from the conversations and dialog that you have with your colleagues.
  • Goals for this Session The following norms are to be read before reading slide 2. Refer to the norms throughout the training, as needed. Stay engaged Speak your truth Experience discomfort 4. Expect and accept non-closure Read the “Goals For This Session” that are listed on slide. Additional Comments The topic of whiteness is pervasive in all materials. Whiteness in our society is a historical truth Self reflection about our racial identity is important work We ask that you not take this personally – this is about looking at the history of the U.S. and how it relates to our growing diverse population of students. After we have completed the training, our hope is that you will walk away with a better awareness of the racial/educational disparity between students of color and their Caucasian peers. We would ask that you wear your new lenses ALL the time.
  • Assumptions of the Session Read the assumptions listed on slide 3. Additional Comments The landscape in education has changed as we are now a more diverse population than we were 10 years ago. Research says that by 2050, minority groups will be the majority in the U.S. What remains the same is that classrooms are taught by predominately Caucasian staff. As more students of color come to us, our challenge is to meet those students with unwavering support and a commitment to helping them achieve academic success.
  • Definitions Read the definitions listed on slide 4. Additional Comments If you do not have a personal analogy, feel free to elaborate on Gerald’s example: “Every day should be a home game for our students.” Gerald gave an example of what it felt like for him to play football: A home game vs. an away game.
  • It Starts With Our Thinking Read the quotes to the audience.
  • The Journey to the Right Attitude Begins With Self Hand out the sheet with the rectangle on it: “How Much Is My Life Impacted by Race?” Read the instructions on slide 6. (2 minutes) Presenter(s) share your illustration of the rectangle with staff and explain your percentage. EX: I colored in 75% of the rectangle because every day, I have conversations with students, parents and/or staff about the needs of our (racial group.) Let staff know that it’s okay if they only color a small percentage of the rectangle because it’s all dependent on the make-up of their school and/or people in their lives. It may be that your building does not have a high percentage of students of color and that your typical day is spent working with high needs students (discipline, special education group, etc.) You would use that as an example. After presenter shares, ask staff to discuss the question “On a typical day, what percentage from 0-100%, does race impact your life?” with an elbow partner. (5 min.) Presenter: The landscape in our school district has changed and today’s training is one more step towards cultural awareness of our students and how to better serve them.
  • Reflect and Discuss Read the two questions. Ask them to reflect (2 min.) Discuss with elbow partner. (5 min.) Hand out the article “White Privilege: “Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack,” by Peggy McIntosh.
  • This Work Begins With Self Knowledge Background knowledge for the presenter if needed. White Privilege Definition: In critical race theory, white privilege is a system of advantages that are believed to be enjoyed by the dominant culture, beyond those commonly experienced by people of color in the same social, political, or economic spaces. (from Wikipedia)
  • Read out loud. Discussion and/or share-out are optional.
  • Read out loud. Pronunciation of Pedro’s name: peh-droh no-ghe-raw Background info to be used, as needed: Pedro Noguera is the Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education at New York University.  Noguera is an urban sociologist whose scholarship and research focuses on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions in the urban environment. 
  • Before you read the cultural responsiveness characteristics, you can explain that this continuum is like a pendulum or a line that goes from left to right. Left being the least responsive and to the right the most responsive. Hand out the Cultural Responsiveness Continuum and read each description out loud.
  • Continue to read each description out loud.
  • Read over the instructions on slide 13 and allow pairs to work on the activity.
  • Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible Introduction to DVD: The video that we are going to view is based on powerful dialogue as a support for learning, change, and healing related to undoing race-based oppression. It features experiences of people who are social justice advocates. They have worked to gain insight into what it means, as White people, to challenge notions of race, racism, culture and White identity development in the United States. We will be watching sections of the DVD, followed by reflection time and dialogue about the content. View part I, stop after viewing “The Ground Shifts,” (approx. 12 min.) which is before “Thousand Little Cuts” section. Go to slide 15 Reflections…Round 1
  • Reflections…Round 1 Read the questions out loud, ask staff to respond to questions, allow 10 min. for sharing with elbow partner. GIVE STAFF 10 MIN. BREAK
  • Reflections…Round 2 View Part II which will include “Thousand Little Cuts, Sickness Within, Apology (approx. 10 min.) Stop after Apology section which is before “Labyrinth” section. Do Reflections…Round 2 (10 min)
  • Reflections…Round 3 Continue with Part III of the DVD – “Labyrinth, Conversations, and The Life I would Live” (approx. 25 min.) Do Reflections…Round 3 (10 min.)
  • Using Our Privilege for Social Justice Read over the slide, personalize as much as you can by making connections to your student population – It’s about the students. Remember what I said about going to an optometrist: My hope is that having completed this training, you can now view your students through different cultural lenses. Example: It’s like going to an optometrist and getting new glasses (give example of when optometrist is checking ones eyes and asks, “ is this one better, is this one better.”).
  • Final Thoughts…Live in the Questions Make connections to your student population and their needs.
  • Adjourn

Transcript

  • 1. Our greatest teacher leaders will be those who teach and reach a broad section of our students…including those students who do not look or live like them. Pedagogy For All 08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director, Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 2. Goals for this Session
    • Provide a “dangerously safe” place for you to engage in dialogue to examine the dominance of whiteness.
    • Internal Focus : Self-reflection activities to continue to deepen your understanding of your own racial identity and how it impacts your work.
    • External Focus : Understand and internalize the continuum of cultural proficiency and apply your learning.
    • Application : Develop a picture of powerful pedagogy in your classroom or worksite, and construct new lenses to see what may have been invisible…this will allow you to engage in more effective practices.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman Executive Director, Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 3. Assumptions of the Session
    • All of us are at different places on the journey to being culturally competent.
    • Two primary “isms” in school-systems that threaten social justice are classism and racism.
    • The new descriptor of a great teacher/educator has to have cultural competency at its core.
    • Adults learn in community and through dialogue.
    • No one has all the answers…All people have to grapple with issues of racism and classism…
    Ger 08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director, Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 4. Definitions 08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 5. “ When teachers do not understand the potential of the students they teach. They will under teach them no matter the methodology.” ---Lisa Delpit “ The very best practitioner in education will fail without the right attitude. Attitude underlies everything necessary in successful teaching.”—Linton & Singleton It Starts With Our Thinking 08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 6. The Journey to the Right Attitude Begins with Self
    • On a typical day, what percentage,
    • from 0 to 100%, does race impact your life? Illustrate on rectangles.
    • Why? Discuss with a partner.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 7. Reflect and Discuss
    • Are there students and adults I empathize with more than others? What accounts for this difference?
    • How do I react when racial issues come up in a conversation? Do I feel anxious? Defensive? Do I speak openly? Do my reactions differ if the group is the same race as I am?
            • 5 minutes
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affaris
  • 8. This Work Begins with Self-Knowledge White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack and examples of white privilege – time to reflect on what you read. Highlight any conditions that jump out at you.(3 min.) Discuss in pairs. (5 min.) McIntosh, P. (1990). White privilege: Unpacking the invisible knapsack. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College Center for Research. 08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 9. Education Redefined
    • 1 out of every 10 students in our the Puyallup School District are students of color
    • 5 out of every 5 students in our system has to function effectively in a dynamic world and as citizens of the world
    • Where we have been: I am a good educator/person and I am comfortable engaging students and families who look like me and who are from a culture similar to mine.
    • Where we need to be : Education and cultural competency are now tightly coupled. We can no longer say we are great educators, or even good educators if we are not committed to being culturally competent and skilled in the full engagement of all students and families in our school communities.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 10. “ When Race and Class cease to be predictors of achievement.” Pedro Noguera How Will We Know We Have Truly Great Schools? 08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 11. Cultural Responsiveness Continuum
    • Cultural destructiveness : negating, disparaging, or purging cultures different from your own.
    • Cultural incapacity : elevating the superiority of your own cultural values and beliefs and suppressing the cultures that are different from your own.
    • Cultural blindness : acting as if differences among cultures do not exist and refusing to recognize any differences.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 12. … Culturally Responsiveness Continuum
    • Cultural pre-competence : recognizing that lack of knowledge, experience, and understanding of other cultures limits your ability to effectively interact with them.
    • Cultural competence : interacting with other cultures in ways that recognize and value their differences, motivate you to assess your own skills, expand your knowledge and resources and ultimately, cause you to adapt your relational behavior.
    • Cultural responsiveness : honoring the differences among cultures, viewing diversity as a benefit, and interacting knowledgeably and respectfully among a variety of cultural groups.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 13. Real-World Connections…
    • Working in pairs (10 minutes)
    • Reflect on your own experiences. Generate a real-life example that illustrates each level on the continuum.
    • Provide examples using situations or events while refraining from using names and identifiers.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 14. Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible
    • Activity: Watch the video in three sections.
    • Jot down your reactions on paper.
    • Respond to reflective questions at the end
    • of each section.
    • Debrief with a partner.
    • (55minutes)
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 15. Reflections…Round 1
      • What moved you?
      • Who or what was easiest for you to identify with?
      • Who or what was the hardest?
      • What were the parts of the DVD that brought up feelings for you, such as shame, guilt, envy, anger, sadness, recognition, joy satisfaction, hope or other feelings?
      • Jot down your responses. Talk with a partner.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 16. Reflections…Round 2
      • How do stories from the video relate to your own life?
      • Why do you think they stood out for you?
      • Jot down your responses. Partner talk.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 17. Reflections…Round 3
      • How do the messages about race, culture, and privilege impact schools? Your work?
      • Jot down your responses. Talk with a partner.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 18. Using Our Privilege for Social Justice
    • Don’t just “try on” your new glasses, wear them all the time.
    • Once you fire the “bullet” and unveil white privilege you can’t undo it, you now know it…you either choose to ignore it, deny it or use this knowledge to create social justice.
    • Do something—act differently with your new knowledge.
    • Resist being preoccupied with worry about “doing it wrong” or making a mistake… lead with questions.
    • Dare to make people uncomfortable, including yourself.
    • Openly advocate for systems and practices that promote equity.
    • Seek out and foster cross-racial connections, conversations, and dialogue.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 19. Final Thoughts…Live in the Questions
    • Who are the students who are honored in our schools?
    • Is this honor and praise distributed equitably?
    • How do you decide which students are worthy of celebrations?
    • Do most of them look like you?
    • What will these students speak about you and your work?
    • Are all students visible, does every student have a voice, do they all matter?
    • Is your classroom or school a place of selection or development?
    • How are you engaging promise…the promise found in every single child who enters our classrooms and school?
    • Are you willing to be haunted…haunted to reflect, haunted to question your practice, your habits, haunted to change?
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 20. Our Students are Counting on Us!! 08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs
  • 21. References
    • Bolgatz, J. (2005). Talking race in the classroom . New York: Teachers College Press.
    • Delpit, L. (2006). Other people’s children . New York: The New Press.
    • Perry, T,. Steele, C., Hilliard, A. (2003). Young, gifted and black . Massachusetts: Beacon Press Books.
    • Greene S., Abt-Perkins. (2003). Making race visible . New York: Teachers College Press.
    • Lelyveld, J. (2001). How race is lived in America. New York: Times Books.
    • Lindsey, R.B., Robert, L.M., & Campbell/Jones, F. (2005). The culturally proficient school. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press.
    • Loewen, J. W. (1995). Lies my teacher told me . New York: Touchstone.
    • Singleton, G.E., Linton, C. (2006). Courageous conversations about race . California: Corwin Press, Inc.
    08/13/10 08:26 PM Gerald Denman, Executive Director Office of Diversity Affairs