Awesense Media Coverage
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Ongoing media coverage has been secured in all major national and international news outlets in English and other languages, including the BC Business, Business Vancouver, Green Tech Media, Smart Grid ...

Ongoing media coverage has been secured in all major national and international news outlets in English and other languages, including the BC Business, Business Vancouver, Green Tech Media, Smart Grid News, Smart Planet , GigaOM, MIT Tech. Review and Huffington Post.

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Awesense Media Coverage Document Transcript

  • 1. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 1 1st Quarter Media Report “Awesense, a startup using wireless mesh tech and software, has launched to sell utilities energy theft-prevention. Didn’t know it was such a problem? A Canadian utility has said it’s losing $100 million a year to theft; in India about 30 percent of power is used illegally.” Katie Fehrenbacher GigaOM “Awesense first tested its system with utility Fortis BC, and while it hasn’t officially named BC Hydro as a customer, it did win a $40,000 sustainability prize from British Columbia’s biggest utility in 2011. The company is also working with unnamed advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) vendors to integrate its data into their systems, Steiner-Jovic said, though he didn’t name the partners involved. Both Fortis BC and BC Hydro are using Cisco and Itron for their smart meter deployments.” Jeff St. John Green Tech Media “The idea that an estimated $202.2 billion in electricity generated around the world each year is lost to energy theft or equipment failure may be hard to fathom. But a Vancouver, B.C. startup that develops technologies to reduce grid power losses puts it into more manageable scenarios. Liz Enbysk Smart Grid News “By selling its services rather than its equipment and software, Awesense can serve utilities that don't want to invest the capital or hire employees to manage the sensor and data collection.” Ucilia Renewable Energy World “The IP they have is the combination of the clamp sensor and the software analytics to spot potential theft. It is a relatively simple way to do that doesn't require a lot of upfront investment.” Martin LaMonica MIT Technology Review First quarter, Awesense announced the release of SenseNET service for economically reducing power losses due to theft and equipment failure. The announcement garnered twenty seven unique articles and 3,030, 220 online impressions. Articles were included in GigaOM, Green Tech Media, Renewable Energy World, Smart Grid news and local print and digital media Business Vancouver. January to March, 2013 27 3,030,220 Unique articles Online article impressions 184Tweets 200k Twitter impressions 200 + Unique Twitter users @greentechmedia Greentech Media Inc. Awesense Wireless and the Movable Smart Grid - The distribution power grid -- the part of the grid that carries medi... http://t.co/5otcCrqZ Katie Fehrenbacher katiefehren A startup emerges to use wireless mesh and the cloud to fight energy theft http://bit.ly/XSVkty Martin LaMonica @mlamonica Clamping Down on Energy Theft http://techre.vu/XvG6sa Startup's sensor detects power stolen from power lines (pot farms are big offenders) @smartgridman Steven E Collier Awesense: A new kind of distributed intelligent electronic devices to make the grid smarter.http://t.co/RYIV7qrU @j3juliano John J. Juliano .@Awesense puts a low-cost #powertheft sensing solution into initial usages in US, EU, Asia http://t.co/XHmcxxWm #utilities #smartgrid
  • 2. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 2 Summary: Unique Articles Date Media Name Article Author January 16, 2013 Part 2: Meet 6 more nominees for 2013 Smart Grid Companies to Watch January 21, 2013 Tech Socials: Jan 21 - feat. John Gray interview Awesense CEO John gray January 21, 2013 A startup emerges to use wireless mesh and the cloud to fight energy theft Katie Fehrenbacher January 21, 2013 Startup Clamps Down on Energy Theft Martin LaMonica January 22, 2013 Startup fights power thieves, pot growers Kirsten Korosec How a Startup Helps Utilities Spot Energy Theft Ucilia Wang January 22, 2013 The daily Energy January 22, 2013 Awesense Wireless and the Movable Smart Grid Jeff St. John January 22, 2013 A startup emerges to use wireless filigree and a cloud to quarrel appetite theft Chrish Owell January 23, 2013 A start-up fight energy theft and illegal connections to the electricity grid Bernard Neumeister January 23, 2013 Utilities no longer need to buy SenseNet to benefit from it January 24, 2013 Awesense Releases SenseNET Service for Economically Reducing Power Losses Due to Theft and Equipment Failure January 24, 2013 Awesense Announces Launch of its New SenseNET Service Shankar Pandiath
  • 3. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 3 Summary: Unique Articles Date Media Name Article Author January 25, 2013 Canadian Company Tests Electricity Theft Detecting Devices in Bulgaria Gergana Mihailova February 5, 2013 Canadian Digital Media Network Soft-Landing Program | Opportunities to Launch Outside Home Market February 11, 2013 Canadian startup puts a collection agency spin on stopping electricity theft Liz Enbysk February 12, 2013 Turkey prepares to hand $5bn to US biz for intelligent electricity Bill Ray February 12, 2013 Wavefront helping startups tap into $1.2 trillion M2M market Nelson Bennett February 12, 2013 Energy Theft Goes Global Sarah Battaglia February 15, 2013 Smarter power grids in Turkey! Zeynel A. Öztürk February 15, 2013 Turkey giant project! February 2013 Awesense’s Wireless Monitoring for Power Grids Goes International Jean Sorensen March 12, 2013 Minister Fast Launches New Start-Up Program to Help Canadian Companies Succeed Abroad March 5, 2013 3 Factors That Could Make or Break the Secondary Transformer Monitor Market Ben Kellison March 12, 2013 2013 Cleantech Emerging Rockets Geoffrey Hansen March 14, 2013 Federal promote overseas business plan 10 companies received assistance March, 2013 Awesense Launches new service offering
  • 4. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 4 Article: Part 2: Meet 6 more nominees for 2013 Smart Grid Companies to Watch Author: Editor Date: Jan 16, 2013 Smart Grid, smart grid companies, smart grid companies to watch, 2013 smart grid companies, Smart Grid News companies to watch Scroll down for the next six companies nominated for our 2013 Smart Grid Companies to Watch competition. (If you missed the first six, they are linked at the bottom.) Eventually we will get to 13 companies, but for now we're in elimination mode. We received so many thoughtful nominations this year that instead of SGN editors making the first cut as we've done in the past, we're asking you to do it. . How it works: In coming days we'll introduce you in random order to companies that were nominated this year. The only nominations you won't see are those received after the deadline and those that didn't follow the guidelines. From our reports store: "Smart Grid Business 2012 to 2017," published by Memoori, analyzes the smart grid market's size, technologies, finance and needed investments, demand forecasts and more. We will run only one nomination per company, even if more than one was received. And in many cases we will provide a condensed version of the nomination since many Smart Grid, smart grid companies, smart grid companies to watch, 2013 smart grid companies, Smart Grid News companies to watch folks had trouble limiting their nominations to a single paragraph. You should also know that we have not verified the accuracy of information contained in nominations. With each set of nominations – the playoffs, if you will – you'll have a chance to vote for the company you think most deserves to be in the final round of voting. Once we've featured all of the companies nominated, we'll take the 25 companies that receive the most votes and ask you to decide the final 13 Smart Grid Companies to Watch in 2013. The second batch of company nominations appear below. If you think one of them deserves to be in the final 25, be sure to vote in the quick poll. Note: Once you have voted the poll data will disappear. Also feel free to use the Talk Back comment form below to lobby on your choice's behalf. And finally, be sure to come back tomorrow to see who else has been nominated. Awesense Wireless has created a system that helps utilities solve one of the industry’s most persistent problems: unanticipated losses due to theft or equipment failure. Approximately 30 percent of India’s power gets illegally siphoned off. In Brazil, 10,000 new unauthorized connections appear every month. Even in established nations, bill fraud and meter tampering remain far-reaching problems. Unfortunately, utilities have historically lacked economical or practical means to combat the problem, relying instead on warnings, inspections, lock boxes and hope. Awesense changes the paradigm by giving utilities the ability to detect and anticipate problems over wide portions of a service territory through hardware, software and networking. The Awesense system also provides verification, ongoing monitoring and data analysis while minimizing field operations or installed infrastructure. While Awesense has already helped North American customers like Fortis BC and others recover tens of millions of dollars in losses, it has also begun to collaborate with ELO Sistemas Eletronicos to bring the technology to Latin America. Awesense Wireless>> Echelon -- I have known Echelon for many years and what continues to impress me is its ability to create solid products that resonate well with the smart grid market. The company combines its history and the current market needs to create the right solution for the needs of today while they are able to scale and expand their products for the future. They understand standards, trends and customers. I suggest you all take a good look at Echelon. Read their case studies. Echelon website>>
  • 5. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 5 GELI -- I really do think that we'll look back on 2013 as the year that the many capabilities and cost of energy storage finally reached the tipping point. GELI will be a big reason why. It's difficult to integrate and operate energy storage. GELI goes above and beyond that to optimize it across multiple value streams such as Demand Charge Management, TOU Energy Shifting, Demand Response -- much more than just backup power -- all in the context of the grid and the broader electricity market. GELI's core IP is what makes storage so compelling from a cost perspective, and its "interoperable by design" architecture ensures that any combination of storage and inverters can be used in virtually any scenario. Few companies are poised to be as disruptive as GELI. GELI website >> IUS Technologies -- At IUS Technologies, they are innovators. They develop groundbreaking smart sensors ideal for end of line monitoring, which will enable utilities to optimize to a more efficient electric grid. Their VS series of devices are like nothing else on the market today - both the VS 1000 and VS 3000 sensors streamline the use of utility radio bandwidth, reducing communication loads up to 95%, and with up to 0.3% accuracy. Although this in itself saves considerable time, bandwidth and resources - it is the precision, accuracy and cost which make IUS unique. There is no other sensor on the market that provides this level of accuracy with the low cost of ownership. It is this scale which will allow utilities to place sensors approximately every mile as necessary in order to create an extremely stable and reliable grid. Recently launched, IUS Technologies is a subsidiary of the Korean based Vitzro Group and headquartered in Alpharetta, GA. IUS Technologies website >> Power Analytics -- Continuing on the success of 2012, 2013 will be another banner year for Power Analytics. Power Analytics was just recently selected to provide the first managed cluster of microgrids in a military environment by ESTCP (DoD's environmental technology demonstration and validation program established in 1995 to promote the transfer of innovative technologies that have successfully established proof of concept to field or production use). 2013 will be the beginning of the microgrid cluster concept at three naval bases in San Diego, CA. Under new leadership of CEO Michael J. Nark, an aggressive marketing campaign will branch out into multiple market segments clamoring for smart grid technologies. Power Analytics plans to do even more with strategic partners and technology enabling companies this year. On a technical front, Power Analytics will continue to release enhanced versions of software. Power Analytics website >> Sensus is leading the way for a NEW smart grid: one for water. In a groundbreaking 2012 survey of more than 180 utilities, Sensus found utilities are losing $9.6 billion each year from leaked water and utilities worldwide can save up to $12.5 billion a year by implementing a smart water network. Sensus continues to lead with products and solutions to meet the crisis head-on and by identifying the opportunity and a path toward a solution to justify the investments by engaging a wide array of stakeholders to safeguard the supply of clean water – including utilities and municipalities, regulators, investors, industry associations, technology providers and academia.Sensus is certainly worth watching in 2013 as the world grapples with how to handle access to water. Sensus website >>
  • 6. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 6 Article: Tech Socials: Jan 21 - feat. John Gray interview w/ AWESENSE CEO Author: John Grey Date: January 21, 2013 Mischa, founder, President and CEO of Awesense Wireless. He holds a Diploma of Technology in Telecommunications from BCIT, and a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering from University of Victoria. Mischa brings product development and management experience in the embedded electronics, wireless, and industrial sectors. Development experience includes product development for start-up companies within a high-tech business incubator. Mischa also represents Awesense Wireless as a voting and participating member within the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP) led by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Mischa has helped initiate recycling programs in his community and is an avid advocate for energy efficiency. ABOUT AWESENSE Awesense is dedicated to providing utilities with intuitive, affordable tools to reduce losses from power theft, meter malfunctions and transformer overloading. The Awesense hardware/software solution includes easily deployed portable line monitors that can be placed when and where needed, to record power consumption and wirelessly communicate to remote gateway receivers. Detection, reporting and data management, is automated using the Awesense senseNET software services. Awesense solutions are in use today, helping utilities recover over 100 million dollars every year and growing. Awesense is the worldwide market leader in systems focused on bypass detection and confirmation, and currently markets internationally on four continents. John Gray John jumped into the Start-up world in early 2009, bringing his experience in business development and sales to companies creating new software products. He was co-founder and CEO of Mentionmapp, a visual analytics company that was acquired by OverInteractive Media in October 2011. Before that, he sold legal software and services (LexisNexis), medical devices (Auto Control Medical) and technical education for CAD/CAM software (Rand Worldwide). John’s also been a Vancouver Startup Weekend organizer. He’s now a full time freelance writer and storyteller. The Vancouver tech startup, design, and gaming community has no shortage of great stories waiting be told, and John’s looking forward to writing them. John has a B.Ap.Sc. in Communications and a B.A. in English, both from Simon Fraser University. John’s a single dad, trying to keep out of the way of two great young adults getting on with their lives.
  • 7. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 7 Article: A start-up emerges to use wireless mesh and the cloud to fight energy theft Author: Katie Fehrenbacher Date: January 21, 2013 Awesense, a startup using wireless mesh tech and software, has launched to sell utilities energy theft-prevention. Didn’t know it was such a problem? A Canadian utility has said it’s losing $100 million a year to theft; in India about 30 percent of power is used illegally. tweet this Utilities call energy theft — like when an indoor marijuana farm taps directly into a high voltage line for its super bright lights — a “non- technical loss” or a “commercial loss.” It’s a bizarrely mundane term to describe thefts which cost utilities billions of dollars in losses a year around the world. For example, Canadian utility BC Hydro has estimated that it’s losing a shocking $100 million each year from power theft. That security problem is what a young Canadian startup called Awesense has emerged to tackle. The company, founded back in late 2009, has developed a product that uses power line sensors connected through a wireless mesh network combined with a cloud-based application. Utility workers can use the combo to remotely monitor and learn details about how much power their companies are actually distributing, versus how much power is being measured by their billing systems. In other words, “how much revenue they’re losing,” as Awesense founder and CEO Mischa Steiner-Jovic explains it. Awesense’s technology is a mobile solution — utility workers clamp on the power line sensors wherever they suspect theft is happening, and if no theft is being detected they can simply move the network to another part of the grid. The sensor nodes create the ad-hoc mesh network amongst themselves (via the 915 band in North America, for all you wireless spectrum geeks out there). The capital expense of the networks are low enough that Awesense has now decided to start selling theft detection as a service. Awesense will install the technology for utilities for no upfront cost, and then take a cut of the revenue saved. Steiner-Jovic says over the past few years they’ve realized that there’s been a lot of interest from utilities for the theft-detection product, but that utility budgets are often times small and rigid. In addition to growing its theft detection-as-a-service this year, Awesense is hoping to grow its list of international customers, where energy theft is a massive issue. Currently it has customers (it’s not disclosing the names other than Fortis BC) in Canada, the U.S., and Latin America, and it’s looking to expand more into Latin America as well as Asia Pacific and Europe. India has some of the highest theft losses in the world, with close to 30 percent of the power in the country lost to theft (check out some photos of the crazy jerry- rigged power grids of Old Delhi). The former Soviet Union has almost 50 percent. Brazil is at 15 percent. To date, Awesense has been mostly bootstrapped, and just raised a “seven figure” round from angels last Summer. Steiner-Jovic says the company could be interested in raising a venture round in the future to grow its business. Applying IT tech to the power grid and clean energy is still an area where startups have been able to get funding from some venture capitalists, despite the difficult funding environment for most cleantech.
  • 8. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 8 Article: Startup Clamps Down on Energy Theft Author: Martin LaMonica Date: January 21, 2013 Awesense attaches clamps to power lines to pinpoint sources of electricity theft, which costs utilities billions of dollars a year. A clamp sensor is attached to a power line with standard power line tools and, through a cloud application, can help determine if electricity is being lost through theft. Credit: Awesense. Billions of dollars worth of electricity is pilfered every year, sending power to individual homes and businesses as well as more large operations, such as marijuana farms. A study from the Electric Power Research Institute in 2006 estimated that “non-technical losses,” or losses from theft or tampering, was $6.5 billion. That number is much higher in other countries where tapping into power lines is routine, both by people who can’t afford electricity as well as big companies and the well-to-do, according to the World Bank, which says energy theft is particularly severe in India, Brazil, and other parts of Latin America. Reducing energy theft is one of the justifications for advanced power meters because they are accurate and, since they continually send consumption data to utilities, can quickly spot unusual activity. In 2009, the World Bank published an analysis of energy theft and recommended that advanced meters be put in place because, among other reasons, theft raises the prices of electricity for others. Losses during distribution and transmission in India, for example, were as high as 38 percent in 1999, which was cut to under 20 percent by 2008 in large part by controlling theft, according the World Bank. But often thieves will simply tap power lines before they reach the meter or, for more sophisticated theives, draw power from high-voltage lines, says Mischa Steiner-Jovic, the CEO of Awesense, a company he founded three years ago to tackle energy theft. Its theft-detection method doesn’t require smart meters, offering a relatively simple and inexpensive way to pinpoint where power is being diverted illegally. Awesense sells a sensor that a line worker attaches to power lines. The battery-powered clamp measures the amount of current flowing through, calculates power consumption, and sends the data back to Awesense’s hosted application called SenseNET. By comparing actual consumption to billed electricity, the back-end software can determine if some theft is happening in that area, usually within a day, according to Steiner-Jovic. The clamp-on sensors are normally only in place temporarily and then moved to another spot. On Tuesday Awesense is announcing a managed service where it will do the work of attaching monitors and generated the data. Instead of having a utility buy the system, Awesense will be paid by sharing savings from throttling theft. The system has been used by a “handful” of utilities in North America and the Vancouver-based company plans to expand into Europe in the first quarter with pilot tests, Steiner-Jovic says. In its first trials, the company found theft can add between $50 to $200 in electricity bills a year. The company has been funded by a round from angel investors last year. It’s also a very dangerous to tap live power lines, which can cause shocks or fires, according to Michigan-based Consumers Energy which deals with 70,000 cases a year. “Not only is energy theft illegal it is also a safety threat - to those who tamper with electric utility equipment, to the general public and to utility workers who can be injured or killed by hazards left behind by the culprit,” said Chuck Walls, vice president of customer financial operations of ComEd in a release about its help in convicting a local man for stealing power.
  • 9. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 9 Article: Startup fights power thieves, pot growers Author: Kirsten Korosec Date: January 22, 2013 Billions of dollars worth of electricity is stolen each year by folks tapping into power lines to bring free energy into their homes, businesses and increasingly, to their indoor pot growing operations. It’s an incessant global problem that’s expected to get worse as demand for power grows. Awesense, a Canadian startup that has remained largely under the radar since its founding in 2009, has launched a service to help utilities curb power losses and recover revenue lost by theft, transformer overloads and other equipment failures. The company has developed a product called the SenseNET system, which combines hardware, data analytics, networking and advanced monitoring to pinpoint power losses from equipment failures and power diversion (aka theft) caused by meter tampering or wire “tapping.” How it works The heart of the system is the SenseNET Monitor, a networked sensor that clips onto transmission and distribution lines. Utility workers can attach a networked sensor in less than two minutes with a hot stick or a truck to wirelessly monitor that particular section of the grid via a laptop or tablet in real time. The sensors, which are connected through a wireless mesh network, can help the utility identify inefficiencies and power theft. Once the problem has been fixed, the utility can move the sensors to a different section of the grid. Canadian utility Fortis BC is using the sensor technology. An unnamed U.S. utility with about 34,000 meters and 1,800 miles of energized lines has deployed the SenseNET system under a service contract. Utilities in Malaysia, Turkey, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic also will begin trials of the service in the first quarter of the year. In the past, Awesense sold its technology as a turn-key system to utilities. Now, the company is selling it as a service that doesn’t require the utility to make an upfront capital investment. Once a utility signs on and begins using the service, Awesense is paid through a percentage of recovered revenue. Global problem Those recovered revenues could be substantial. In India alone, about 27 percent of the power generated gets siphoned off through theft, costing the nation’s distribution companies an estimated $16 billion a year, according to India’s Central Electricity Authority. Globally, $202 billion worth of electricity generated is lost each year due to technical failures or theft, according to World Bank estimates. Energy theft is a problem in developed nations as well. Energy diversion, like when an illegal pot growing operation taps into a power line, costs U.S. utilities an estimated $6 billion a year, making electricity the third most stolen commodity behind credit card information and cars, according to data provided by Awesense.
  • 10. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 10 Article: How a Startup Helps Utilities Spot Energy Theft Author: Ucilia Wang (Contributing Editor) Date: January 22, 2013 SAN FRANCISCO -- Stealing electricity costs not only utilities but also the consumers who help to pay for the costs of producing and transporting power. A startup called Awesense is using sensors and data analytics to help utilities detect energy theft and improve the efficiency of the grid. The company, founded in 2009 and located in Vancouver in Canada, recently signed up a U.S. utility that agreed to use Awesense's new sales model, said Mischa Steiner-Jovic, CEO ofAwesense. Instead of selling the equipment and software outright, Awesense can finance the equipment installation and data crunching and make money by getting a percentage of the revenue that comes from stopping the energy theft or charging a fee. Steiner-Jovic declined to disclose the name of the utility that has opted for the service contract. Power companies in Malaysia, Turkey, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic also plan to carry out trials of Awesense' technology starting this quarter, he added. Fortis BC in British Columbia is one of its customers. About $220 billion worth of electricity gets lost annually because of theft or technical problems with the grid, according to a report by the World Bank in 2009. Most of the losses aren't due to technical problems, though. Energy theft is a big problem in India: about 27 percent is diverted illegally, according to its government. Theft amounts to $6 billion per year in the U.S., according to the same report. "Most power thefts bypass the meters, so it's difficult for utilities to determine where they are occurring," Steiner-Jovic said. The startup's technology consists of portable sensors that are about 10-inches tall by 1-inch wide and 4-inches deep and weigh less than a kilogram each. Utility workers can clip them onto wires, where the sensors would measure the current and calculate the energy (in kilowatt-hours) that flows through the line. Through the startup's own wireless network, the data goes back to Awesense's data center for analysis and are accessible by its utility customers. The company has designed its technology for the distribution grid because that is where power theft most commonly takes place. The distribution grid also is less efficient than the transmission grid because it takes power from the high-voltage transmission lines, lowers the voltages along the way and sends the electricity to homes and businesses. The amount of sensors and how closely they are to one another depend on what a utility wants to accomplish. If it wants to simply monitor the energy flow to a line that serves, say, 100 homes, then it could install one sensor on that line. If it wants to pinpoint more precisely where energy losses are occurring, then it would move sensors around or add more of them to home in on the cause, which could be theft or technical problems. The data gives a utility good figures on how much energy flows through and is used in a particular area, Steiner-Jovic said. Otherwise they figure out overall losses based mostly on numbers that show how much power they've generated or bought and how much they have sold. Because Awesense's equipment takes stock of the energy flow and demand, it also could help utilities figure out where they need to add new distribution lines or install power generation equipment, such as solar energy systems, to feed the demand. By selling its services rather than its equipment and software, Awesense can serve utilities that don't want to invest the capital or hire employees to manage the sensor and data collection. It also reduces risk for utilities, which are known to take a while to adopt new technologies and would likely prefer to buy a service rather than invest in equipment from a startup that may not stick around long enough to provide maintenance and fulfill warranties. Awesense raised its first equity round last year, but Steiner-Jovic declined to say how much.
  • 11. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 11 Article: The Daily Energy Author: By Editors January 22, 2013 President Obama (above) began his second administration with a renewed call for dealing with climate change. Taking a swipe at climate skeptics, he said the country must renew the quest to replace fossil fuels with renewable energy. Environmentalists hailed the renewed emphasis but were still waiting to see more action. The most obvious test for the Administration will be the decision on whether or not to build theKeystone Pipeline. Canadians are growing more skeptical that approval will be forthcoming and Americans both pro and con are calling for a quick decision. Meanwhile, Gal Luft, writing on Foreign Policy, urged the President to “end the oil monopoly” by allowing fuels such as natural gas to power automobiles. The Al Qaeda attack on the Algerian gas outpost has claimed 85 dead, three Americans among them. Seven other Americans survived. The attack was apparently an inside job with a former driver at the complex providing information that gave the attackers full knowledge of the complex. Algeria is promising to beef up security but also points out that it was a Canadian citizen who coordinated the operation. Energy theft is becoming a leading world problem as hackers find it easy to steal electricity from power lines. USAID has promised to help Pakistan deal with the problem and both Indiahas launched a crackdown. Sri Lanka has managed to cut pilfering by imposing heavy fines. In the US, Awesense, a small startup, has invented a sensor that can help utilities locate places where power is being drained illegally. But just to top the utilities’ troubles, OilPrice reports amalicious software attack last October kept a major power plant offline for three weeks. Finally, Inside Climate News reports that tax credits for the wind industry have become so appealing that non-energy companies such as Sprint, Starbucks and Levi Strauss are looking to invest. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission reports that wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, hydro and tidal energy together added nearly half the new capacity in the US last year. Power Engineering says that renewables are still confined to niche markets, however, and a Vermont energy expert has told New Hampshire that wind works best in the Midwest and will get very little benefit to mountainous New England. One other item that shouldn't escape notice. Jerome Corsi, writing on WND Money, reports that the US is quietly easing the rules allowing Chinese ownership of oil and gas properties in the US. The reason? We're afraid that if we deny ownership, China might stop lending us money. As they say, you get what you pay for.
  • 12. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 12 Article: Awesense Wireless and the Movable Smart Grid Author: Jeff St. John Date: January 22, 2013 The distribution power grid -- the part of the grid that carries medium- and low- voltage electricity from substations to end users -- is mostly “dark” nowadays, with little in the way of sensors or data for utilities to use to map out just what problems those parts of the grid are facing, let alone how to fix them. Bringing light to that darkened distribution grid is the goal of the sensors, communications and control systems that make up distribution management and automation systems. DA is a big and growing business -- GTM Research predicts the U.S. market alone will grow from an annual $1.75 billion in 2012 to peak at just more than $3 billion in 2015. All of that gear is designed to sit out on the grid for decades, hopefully returning its value in improved grid efficiencies and new capabilities over time. But what if a utility could move its networked sensors from one section of the grid to another, testing each out, discovering its inefficiencies and fixing them, and then move on? That’s the idea behind Awesense Wireless, a Vancouver, Canada-based startup founded in 2009 that’s landed some significant utilities as customers, including hometown Fortis BC andBrazil’s ELO Sistemas Electronicos late last year. Awesense, which announced last month that it raised an undisclosed round of funding, has mainly deployed as a turnkey service to date, selling utilities its equipment and training workers to go out and deploy and manage the system. On Monday, it launched a service-based version of the business, which will allow utilities to pay for the deployment via a revenue-sharing agreement -- and, potentially, allow the startup to expand to customers that might be leery of investing in all the gear upfront. The company already has one U.S. utility with approximately 34,000 meters and 1,800 miles of lines using senseNET under just such a service contract, CEO Mischa Steiner-Jovic said in a phone interview. It’s also working with utilities in Malaysia, Turkey, Bulgaria, and the Czech Republic, which plan to begin trials in the first quarter of this year. “The distribution portion of the grid is the most inefficient portion of the grid,” Steiner-Jovic said. Today, utilities use antiquated methodology to find these losses, based on math that tries to get around the lack of data, he said. “We’ve automated the entire process for them, and added a lot of technology,” he said. “In one or two days, they can identify where the loss is occurring, as opposed to weeks and months of analysis.” Awesense’s senseNET system combines line sensor devices, which can be dropped onto distribution cables by utility workers using so-called “hot-stick” methods -- no climbing poles and rewiring grid circuitry required. A typical project might include several hundred such sensors, put out over the course of a few days and connected via the company’s own 900-megahertz band mesh networking. Once they’re up there, the devices self-network and draw back tons of data on power quality, which feeds into the senseNET software suite that helps identify key inefficiencies. Those can include technical losses, such as worn-out transformers or sections of current experiencing phase problems -- but it can also include so-called “non-technical” losses, which is a fancy term for power theft. Awesense first tested its system with utility Fortis BC, and while it hasn’t officially named BC Hydro as a customer, it did win a $40,000 sustainability prize from British Columbia’s biggest utility in 2011. The company is also working with unnamed advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) vendors to integrate its data into their systems, Steiner-Jovic said, though he didn’t name the partners involved. Both Fortis BC and BC Hydro are using Cisco and Itron for their smart meter deployments.
  • 13. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 13 Many of the utilities working with Awesense are rolling the costs into their grid operations and management budgets, he added -- a move that allows utilities to avoid having to make a rate case for capital investments. That’s a testament to the fact that deploying sensors to gather data, then moving them on to the next section of the grid, is a lot cheaper than installing a lot of permanent sensors on all those portions of the grid. Just how much cheaper, Steiner-Jovic didn’t say, though he described the cost as a fraction of what would be required for a full-blown DA deployment. It’s an interesting approach to a problem that utilities are only just beginning to tackle. The World Bank estimates that $202 billion worth of electricity generated is lost per year due to technical failures or theft. Some emerging economies, such as India and Brazil, can see those losses rise as high as 30 percent to 40 percent -- but North America, which has a minimal power theft problem in comparison, still loses about $6 billion a year to “energy diversion,” according to World Bank figures. British Columbia in particular suffers from power stolen to fuel illegal marijuana grow operations, with estimates of the resulting power loss ranging from $12 million in 2003 to $100 million in 2010. Interestingly, one key problem in proving such theft figures is the lack of data of the auditable quality that Awesense’s system delivers -- making the smart grid a tool in courts of law, as well as in the utility control room. Not surprisingly, however, Steiner-Jovic declined to comment on whether any of Awesense’s clients were using its capabilities to bust power-stealing pot grows or other illegal operations -- after all, thieves are on the lookout for utility workers who might be spying on their power use.
  • 14. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 14 Article: and a cloud to quarrel appetite theft Author: Chrish Owell Date: January 22, 2013 Utilities call appetite burglary — like when an indoor pot plantation taps directly into a high voltage line for a super splendid lights — a “non-technical loss” or a “commercial loss.” It’s a bizarrely paltry tenure to report thefts that cost utilities billions of dollars in waste a year around a world. For example, Canadian focus BC Hydro has estimated that it’s losing a intolerable $100 million any year from appetite theft. That confidence problem is what a immature Canadian startup called Awesense has emerged to tackle. The company, founded behind in late 2009, has grown a product that uses appetite line sensors connected by a wireless filigree network total with a cloud-based application. Utility workers can use a combo to remotely guard and learn sum about how many appetite their companies are indeed distributing, contra how many appetite is being totalled by their billing systems. In other words, “how many income they’re losing,” as Awesense owner and CEO Mischa Steiner-Jovic explains it. Awesense’s record is a mobile resolution — focus workers clamp on a appetite line sensors wherever they think burglary is happening, and if no burglary is being rescued they can simply pierce a network to another partial of a grid. The sensor nodes emanate a ad-hoc filigree network among themselves (via a 915 rope in North America, for all we wireless spectrum geeks out there). The collateral responsibility of a networks are low adequate that Awesense has now motionless to start offered burglary showing as a service. Awesense will implement a record for utilities for no upfront cost, and afterwards take a cut of a income saved. Steiner-Jovic says over a past few years they’ve satisfied that there’s been a lot of seductiveness from utilities for a theft-detection product, though that focus budgets are mostly times tiny and rigid. In further to flourishing a burglary detection-as-a-service this year, Awesense is anticipating to grow a list of general customers, where appetite burglary is a large issue. Currently it has business (it’s not disclosing a names other than Fortis BC) in Canada, a U.S., and Latin America, and it’s looking to expand some-more into Latin America as good as Asia Pacific and Europe. India has some of a top burglary waste in a world, with tighten to 30 percent of a appetite in a nation mislaid to burglary (check out some photos of a crazy jerry-rigged appetite grids of Old Delhi). The former Soviet Union has roughly 50 percent. Brazil is during 15 percent. To date, Awesense has been mostly bootstrapped, and only lifted a “seven figure” turn from angels final Summer. Steiner-Jovic says a association could be meddlesome in lifting a try turn in a destiny to grow a business. Applying IT tech to a appetite grid and purify appetite is still an area where startups have been means to get appropriation from some try capitalists, notwithstanding a difficult appropriation sourroundings for many cleantech.
  • 15. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 15 Article: A start-up fight thieves energy and illegal connections to the electricity network Author: Bernard Neumeister Date: January 23, 2013 Billions of dollars of electricity is stolen each year by people who draw on power lines to get free energy for their homes, businesses and more to their operations to their operations in pot of growing indoors. This is an ongoing global problem is expected to worsen as demand for energy grows. Awesense, a Canadian start-up that has remained largely unknown since its founding in 2009, has launched a service to help reduce the loss of energy utilities and recover revenue lost by theft, overloading of transformers and other failures equipment. The company has developed a system called the SenseNET, which combines hardware product, data analysis, networking and advanced monitoring to identify energy losses from equipment failures and power bypass (such as theft) caused by meter tampering or illegal connections to the son How does it work? The heart of the system is SenseNET monitor, a sensor network that clips on transmission lines and distribution. The public employees can establish a sensor network in less than two minutes with a hot stick or truck to wirelessly control this particular section of the electrical network via a laptop or tablet in real time . The sensors that are connected by a wireless mesh network can help the utility to identify inefficiencies and energy theft. Once the problem has been resolved, the utility can move the sensor to another section of the grid. The operator of Canadian utility Fortis BC uses sensor technology. A service of American public service anonymously about 34,000 meters and 2,900 km of power lines SenseNET deployed the system via a service contract. Public services in Malaysia, Turkey, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic will also begin testing the service in the first quarter of the year. In the past, Awesense sold its technology as a turnkey system for utilities. Now the company sells as a service that does not require for the public service to make a initial capital investment. Once the public service sign and begins to use the service, Awesense is paid via a percentage of revenue recovered. A global problem These revenues collected could be considerable. In India, about 27% of the electricity produced is "siphoned off" by the theft, which costs the distribution companies in the country, an estimated $ 16 billion per year total, according to the Central Electricity Authority in India. Globally, 202 billion dollars of electricity is lost each year due to technical failures or theft, according to estimates by the World Bank. Energy theft is also a problem in developed countries. Diversion of energy, such as illegal connection to a power line, cost U.S. utilities, an estimated 6 billion per year, which makes electricity, 3rd product after the most stolen card data credit and cars, according to data provided by Awesense.
  • 16. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 16 Article Utilities no longer need to buy SenseNet to benefit from it Author: Date: January 23, 2013 Awesense is offering a new service-based business model for its SenseNet product that helps utilities cut power losses and recover lost revenue from theft, transformer overloads and other problems. No upfront investment is needed, the Canadian firm added. British Columbia IOU Fortis BC is using the technology now, Awesense said. Utilities in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Malaysia and Turkey plan to start trials of the SenseNet service this quarter, it added, and an unnamed US utility with about 34,000 meters is deploying SenseNet under the service contract deal. Before adding the service-based approach, Awesense sold SenseNet to utilities. The new deal compensates the firm through a percentage of verified, recovered revenue or a fee. SenseNet is “a comprehensive, economical solution combining hardware, data analytics, networking and advanced power monitoring for identifying, characterizing and verifying power losses from equipment failures as well as power diversion caused by meter tampering or wire ‘tapping',” the firm said. The system serves as a planning tool for grid operators and power providers, helping customers pinpoint potential vulnerabilities before major losses or failures occur. The World Bank estimated $202 billion of power generated is lost per-year due to technical failures or theft, Awesense said, citing India as a prime example. In Ireland, power theft grew by 50% since 2009, the firm said. In the Brazilian capitol of Rio de Janeiro, some experts have said the power lost each year to theft “could provide power to 6.2 million homes,” Marcos Rizzo, VP of business development of ELO Sistemas Eletronicos, said in prepared remarks. ELO is collaborating with Awesense in Latin American markets, Awesense said. SenseNet monitors can characterize the power use at up to 100 locations with 99% accuracy, Awesense added.
  • 17. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 17 Article: Awesense Releases SenseNET Service for Economically Reducing Power Losses Due to Theft and Equipment Failure Author: Editor Date: January 24, 2013 Awesense has announced a new service offering based on its SenseNET solution that will help utilities curb power losses and recover lost revenue due to theft, transformer overloads and other problems without any upfront investment. The SenseNET system is a comprehensive, economical solution combining hardware, data analytics, networking and advanced power monitoring for identifying, characterizing and verifying power losses from equipment failures as well as power diversion caused by meter tampering or wire “tapping.” The company’s technology is currently in use helping North American customers like Fortis BC and others recover tens of millions of dollars in avoidable power losses. The SenseNET system also serves as a planning tool for grid operators and power providers, providing customers the opportunity to pinpoint potential vulnerabilities before major losses or failures occur. While Awesense to date has sold SenseNET technology systems to utilities, the new SenseNET Service will permit utilities to obtain the benefits of the technology through a managed service offering. Under the new program, Awesense will collaborate with utility customers on designing, implementing and managing loss reductions initiatives. Awesense will then be compensated through a percentage of verified, recovered revenue or through a fee. Utilities do not need to make independent capital investments or dedicate funds from operating budgets: the SenseNET Service effectively becomes a supplemental source of revenue. A U.S. utility with approximately 34,000 meters and 1,800 miles of energized lines has already begun to deploy the SenseNET system under a service contract. The utility loses an estimated 5 percent of its generated power to losses. Utilities in Malaysia, Turkey, Bulgaria, and the Czech Republic will begin trials of the SenseNET Service in the first quarter of 2013 while other utilities are beginning to evaluate the service offering. “Unanticipated power losses are a growing global problem. Utilities generate billions of dollars of power every year that they don’t get compensated for and that never gets to their customers,” said Awesense CEO Mischa Steiner-Jovic. “Unanticipated power losses and electricity theft also cause fires, power shortages, injuries among other problems. This is not a victimless crime.” The World Bank estimates that $202 billion worth of electricity generated is lost annually due to technical failures or theft. In India, approximately 27 percent of the electricity generated gets siphoned off through theft while the peak power demand on average exceeds supply by 9 percent, according to the Ministry of Energy. Equipment failures and power diversion are often the root cause of India’s chronic widespread blackouts, such as the power failures of August 2012 that left 640 million residents without power. Power loss cut India’s economic growth by an estimated 1.2 percent annually, according to government statistics. Even in the U.S. and Europe losses are staggeringly high: energy diversion costs U.S. utilities and their customers an estimated $6 billion a year in the U.S., making energy the third most stolen commodity, right behind credit card information and cars. The challenges in catching perpetrators—which can range from individuals to sophisticated marijuana growing operations–often prevents utilities and law enforcement from taking adequate steps to stop it. In Ireland, power theft has increased by 50 percent since 2009. SenseNET changes the dynamic by greatly reducing the capital, equipment and personnel needed to stop power losses while at the same time giving grid operators and utilities an enhanced ability to find power losses. The heart of the system is the SenseNET Monitor, a highly accurate, networked sensor that clips onto transmission and distribution lines. SenseNET Monitors can characterize the power consumption at up to 100 locations at the same time with a 99 percent plus accuracy. Field crews can attach one in less than two minutes with a hot stick or truck. SenseNET Monitors can also be deployed underground. TheSenseNET Suite is a complimentary software platform for analyzing data and managing ongoing operations. SensNET Prioritizer detects abnormalities and prioritizes loss recovery efforts: it mines field data along with data from meter data management and billing systems. SenseNET CORE, meanwhile, is employed to visualize data, generate reports, identify situations requiring immediate attention and exchange information with SenseNET Monitors, networking equipment and other components.
  • 18. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 18 “The electricity lost in Rio de Janeiro alone annually could provide power to 6.2 million homes by some estimates. Providing effective solutions to reduce losses and protect revenue is part of our strategy for Brazil and other Latin American countries,” said Marcos Rizzo, vice president of business development of ELO Sistemas Eletronicos, which is collaborating with Awesense in Latin American markets
  • 19. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 19 Article: Awesense Announces Launch of its New SenseNET Service Author: Shankar Pandiath, Date: January 24, 2013 Awesense, the leading provider of advanced technologies to economically reduce grid power loss, announced the launch of its new service based on the groundbreaking SenseNET solution. The latest SenseNET-based service offering will help utilities to prevent power loss due to transformer overloads, theft, or other problems, without any form of upfront investment. The SenseNET solution, on which Awesense’s new service offering is based, is a comprehensive yet economical system that combines the power of data analytics, hardware, networking and latest monitoring technology to identify, characterize and verify loss of power from equipment failure. The system also identifies and verifies power diversion caused due to wiretapping or meter tampering. Story continues below The SenseNET solution by Awesense is currently deployed in North America, helping clients like Fortis BC and others utilities to efficiently recover ten million dollars in “avoidable power loss,” due to theft or equipment failure. This revolutionary system by Awesense has also been designed as an effective planning tool for power providers and grid operators, enabling them to accurately identify the potential susceptibilities before any major failure or power loss occurs. Awesense has deployed SenseNET technology only to utilities till date, but the latest SenseNET service will allow the utilities to access the core benefits of this technology via “managed service offering.” Talking about power loss, Mischa Steiner-Jovic, the Chief Executive Officer of Awesense, stated that the unexpected power loss is fast emerging as a major problem. Despite investing billions of dollars in power every year, the utilities and power providers don’t get compensated for same as it never reaches the customers. There are increasing instances of power theft and electricity loss, in addition to other major problems such as power shortage, fire and injuries – “this is indeed a crime,” added Mischa. According to an estimate by the World Bank, almost $202 billion worth of power is lost every year due to theft or equipment failures. However, SenseNET solution will transformsthis dynamics by way of drastically reducing equipment, capital, and people needed to prevent power loss. SenseNET Monitor is a highly networked, accurate sensor that is clipped into distribution and transmission lines. It can characterize power consumption at up to 100 locations with more than 99% accuracy, and can also be used underground. Under the new service program, Awesense will partner with utilities and grid operators to design, implement, and manage power loss initiatives and reductions. The company will be compensated on a basis of a percentage of verified and recovered power revenue for the utilities or through a fixed amount of fee.
  • 20. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 20 Article: Canadian Company Tests Electricity Theft Detecting Devices in Bulgaria Author: Gergana Mihailova Date: January 25, 2012 Canadian start-up company Awesense plans to test run its sensors, communication and control system which would help detect and cut the percentage of electricity thefts in Bulgaria. Awesense, which announced last month that it raised an undisclosed round of funding, has mainly deployed as a turnkey service to date, selling utilities its equipment and training workers to go out and deploy and manage the system. On Monday, it launched a service-based version of the business, which will allow utilities to pay for the deployment via a revenue-sharing agreement -- and, potentially, allow the startup to expand to customers that might be leery of investing in all the gear upfront. The company already has one U.S. utility with approximately 34,000 meters and 1,800 miles of lines using senseNET under just such a service contract, CEO Mischa Steiner-Jovic said in a phone interview. It’s also working with utilities in Malaysia, Turkey, Bulgaria, and the Czech Republic, which plan to begin trials in the first quarter of this year, greentechmedia.com reported.
  • 21. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 21 Article: Canadian Digital Media Network Soft-Landing Program Expands Opportunities for Companies to Launch Outside Home Market Author: Editor Date: February 5, 2013 Waterloo Region, ON – February 5, 2012 – Companies from across Canada are establishing themselves in other markets thanks to the Soft-Landing Program supported by the Canadian Digital Media Network (CDMN) in partnership with its nodes across Canada. The CDMN announced today that 14 companies are participating in the most recent round of the Outbound Soft-Landing program under way now, following a successful pilot program in 2012. “Our Soft-Landing Program formula is working, enabling companies to hit the ground running in other geographies to increase their business opportunities,” said Kevin Tuer, CDMN Managing Director. “The pilot program realized an estimated $20 million in new opportunities and sales for participating companies, so we’re excited to see what 2013 brings for the companies announced today.” Applications opened October 15, 2012 for companies from across Canada looking to participate in soft-landings outside the country between January 2 and May 31, 2013. Companies applied through the 21 CDMN ‘nodes’ which then assisted in facilitating the application and mentorship of the enterprises. From the many applications received, the CDMN chose the select group of 14 companies. Ideal candidates to participate in the Outbound Soft-Landing Program are mature Canadian startups and small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that are generating revenue already and have goals of growing their customer base, opening a satellite office, or developing distribution channels or secure partnerships. Through this type of landing, Canadian companies looking to expand in foreign markets anywhere in the world can qualify for up to three months of residency in partner facilities equipped to support their growth, plus up to $4,000 for transportation and hotel costs. Here is the list of startups, the nodes they are working with, and where they will be ‘landing’ as part of the Outbound Soft-Landing Program: Startup Node Destination Authintic Analytics Technologies Digital Media Zone (DMZ) – Toronto New York City Ayogo Health Inc. Wavefront – Vancouver London and Birmingham U.K. Blacksquare Inc. (Blackboxx) TR Tech – Calgary Germany DLI.tools Communitech – Waterloo Melbourne, Australia Green Owl Mobile Communitech – Waterloo New York City Insightworks Learning and Development Sault Ste. Marie Innovation Centre – Sault Ste. Marie Bay Area, California Javelin Reality NGen – Hamilton Venice Beach, California Media Merchants Wavefront – Vancouver Brazil and Singapore Picatic MaRS – Toronto New York City Voices.com Communitech – Waterloo San Francisco, California Viafoura Digital Media Zone (DMZ) – Toronto Venice Beach, California
  • 22. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 22 Weblishpal MaRS – Toronto Singapore Wedding Republic Ottawa New York City Zighra Ottawa Dubai and Jordan, UAE Companies that have previously ‘landed’ outside Canada as part of the CDMN Soft-Landing Program include: Awesense www.awesense.com; CPS Parking CPS Parking; Cyborg Tradingwww.cyborgtrading.com; MAGNET www.magnetforensics.com; Mantry www.mantry.com; Tabillowww.tabillo.com; and Weever Apps www.weeverapps.com. CDMN also supports an Inbound Soft-Landing program for promising international companies looking to establish their businesses in Canada, and companies that have participated include Fluorologicwww.fluorologic.com; and Koning www.koningcorporation.com. There is also a Domestic Soft- Landing program that assists Canadian companies in furthering their growth across the country. For more information on the CDMN Soft-Landing Program, visit http://softlanding.cdmn.ca.
  • 23. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 23 Article: Canadian startup puts a collection agency spin on stopping electricity theft Author: Liz Enbysk Date: February 11, 2013 The idea that an estimated $202.2 billion in electricity generated around the world each year is lost to energy theft or equipment failure may be hard to fathom. But a Vancouver, B.C. startup that develops technologies to reduce grid power losses puts it into more manageable scenarios. According to Awesense:  Energy diversion costs U.S. utilities an estimated $6 billion annually – making energy the third most stolen commodity right behind credit card information and cars  Power loss and equipment failure are so out of control in India that government statistics suggest it cuts the country's economic growth 1.2% annually  The amount of electricity lost in Rio de Janeiro each year could provide power to 6.2 million homes by some estimates, says an ELO Sistemas Electronicos VP I talked with Awesense founder and CEO Mischa Steiner-Jovic, who uses words like "astronomical" and "almost unbelievable" when he describes the amount of money utilities – and their customers – lose each year. "Utilities generate billions of dollars of power every year that they don't get compensated for and never gets to their customers," he says. And those power losses are passed along, adding $50 to $200 to customer electricity bills each year. So as Steiner-Jovic puts it, "it's not a victimless crime," especially if you factor in the fires, power outages and injuries that can result. But catching culprits – who may be individuals trying to avoid high electric bills or sophisticated marijuana grow operations – can be challenging. And all of that is what intrigued the engineer in Steiner-Jovic, who founded Awesense Wireless in 2009 to solve the power loss problem. Awesense prototyped its SenseNET solution with Fortis BC in 2010 and then started selling it to other utilities. We told you last month in a story onenergy theft going from bad to worse about the company's partnership with ELO Sistemas in Latin America. SenseNET combines hardware, data analytics, networking and advanced power monitoring to identify power losses from both equipment failures and diversion caused by meter tampering or line tapping. Basically sensors are clamped onto distribution lines using a hot stick or truck and each sensor can monitor power consumption at up to 100 locations at the same time. So a utility might deploy several hundred sensors, which can then be moved around to cover a broad area. Communication is via a self-creating wireless mesh network. Steiner-Jovic will tell you that SenseNET is quick and easy to deploy, with rapid ROI. He points to one customer that achieved payback in a week. And now it gets even more interesting. Awesense recently announced a no-cost SenseNET-as-a-service offering that has the company collaborating with utilities to design, implement and manage loss reduction initiatives. Awesense is paid through a percentage of recovered revenue, sort of a collection agency model for utilities that don't have the budget or wherewithal to tackle the problem otherwise. Or as Awesense sees it, the SenseNET service becomes a "new" revenue source for utilities. One U.S. utility is already deploying it and Steiner-Jovic says trials are set to begin this quarter in Europe and Asia. SenseNET monitor
  • 24. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 24 Article: Turkey prepares to hand $5bn to US biz for intelligent electricity Author: Bill Ray Date: February 12, 2013 Turkey will spend $5bn over the next two years creating a smart grid to cope with increased energy consumption, and buying plenty of American kit with which to do it. The US consulate in Istanbul put out the figure, Bloomberg notes, as it promotes a two-day conference on the subject. The conference itself is sponsored by the US Trade and Development Agency, which will see US companies pitching intelligent networks to Turkish utilities, and government reps, as well as discussing the regulatory environment which will be necessary to meet Turkey's energy needs. This isn't just about Smart Meters, which only manage consumption in cloud-cuckoo land where everyone uses less power thanks to an LCD screen smiling at them: this is about generating power in the right place and delivering across the country at the right time, while making sure no one steals it en route. The latter is such a problem that a company like Awesense is now offering to trace thefts for free, in exchange for a cut of the saved revenue. Awesense is a US startup which uses clamps placed on electricity lines, measuring current flow by induction and capable of creating a dynamic mesh (in the ISM band at 915MHz) to get the data back to the office. Check the flow at two ends of a wire - and if the loss is higher than predicted, you've found a thief. Just move the clamps and you'll know where they are. Awesense is already involved in Turkey, but is typical of the way an intelligent electricity grid can be more efficient without relying on consumers to use less. Last year Turkish energy consumption rise by more than 5 per cent, while production only grew 4.2 per cent, so better solutions are needed. But creating a Smart Grid will mean working together, and the Istanbul skyline is (as far as your correspondent is aware) the only one in the world graced with multiple TV transmission masts, because the broadcasters couldn't come to a sharing agreement, which bodes badly for cooperative agreements. American companies will have high hopes of selling kit into Turkey, and following the historical route into the Middle East and beyond - Turkey will make an excellent showcase for what a smart grid can achieve, assuming it can achieve it. ®
  • 25. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 25 Article: Wavefront helping startups tap into $1.2 trillion M2M market Author: Nelson Bennett Date: February 12, 2013 Wavefront alumnus Mischa Steiner-Jovic developed SenseNET, used by power utilities around to world to detect power theft | Dominic Schaefer By Nelson BennettTue Feb 12, 2013 12:01am PST Power utilities around the world lose an estimate $200 billion annually to electricity theft and equipment failure. That might explain the growth of Vancouver startup Awesense, which developed a mobile sensor that power companies can connect to power lines to identify power losses on their grids. The company’s headcount has grown to 16 from two in 2009, and it has landed contracts with major power companies in Canada, the U.S. and South America. RewardLoop, which developed a QR-code based customer reward system, has seen similar growth. It has also struck a major partnership deal with Epson, which will embed RewardLoop in its next generation of printers for point-of-sales systems, 85% of which use the Epson printer language. The printers will be able to calculate sales and rewards, which the customer can collect by scanning a QR printed on the receipt. Awesense and RewardLoop are both alumni of an accelerator program at Wavefront, which is doing a bit of accelerating of its own. The wireless accelerator recently took on additional floor space at Guinness Tower on West Hastings Street to accommodate an expansion to allow for more high-tech startups to participate in its programs, like BC Innovation Council’s venture accelerator. The expansion opens up space for up to 175 entrepreneurs. Wavefront plans to graduate 50 startups over the next 30 months. The venture accelerator program at Wavefront provides participants with office space, mentoring and access to a wireless lab for testing a range of hardware and software. It also helps participants access foreign markets and connects them with investors. “What we got out of the program was a good path to commercialization,” said Awesense co-founder and CEO Mischa Steiner-Jovic, who spent a year in Wavefront’s accelerator program. “We were well on our way to closing deals here in Canada, but we had nothing in the pipeline. We didn’t know how we were going to expand. We are [now] an international company and have product in Canada, the U.S., South America and Brazil [and] we’ll be in Europe.” Because of Wavefront’s connections, investors take companies that have been referred to them by the organization seriously. “When we phone a targeted investor and make an introduction, it’s treated differently than when that small company calls directly,” said Wavefront CEO James Maynard. “It set us up for success,” said RewardLoop co-founder Nigel Malkin. “They made introductions that led to virtually all of our funding. They spend every waking hour trying to figure out how they can help us. We’ve raised over $1 million in financing.”
  • 26. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 26 Article: Energy Theft Goes Global Author: Sarah Battaglia Date: February 12, 2013 When you hear the phrase “electricity theft,” you may automatically picture places like India or Brazil where the number of power outages is astounding. Unfortunately, electricity thieves can be found in nearly every country across the globe, including the U.S. Whether it’s performing illegal hookups, tampering with meters, or stealing copper wire from substations, over $200 billion in electricity is lost each year due to equipment failure or electricity thieves. In the U.S. alone, this crime costs roughly $6 billion annually, which makes it the third most stolen commodity following credit card information and vehicles. Reducing, and eventually eliminating, this unlawful activity is one reason why utilities want to install more advanced power meters. Recording consumer data on a regular basis will assist utilities in detecting any unusual activity, therefore decreasing the amount of money utilities lose and abolishing additional price hikes for customers. Brazilian utilities are improving their smart meter technology and working to install these devices on the outside of homes or on top of electricity poles, as opposed to inside residents’ homes. Last year, a Bloomberg article covering this topic stated, “The meters can detect unusually heavy demand, which may signal an illegal hookup. They can also be used to shut off service to households and businesses that don’t pay their bills. The devices remove the human factor from the equation, so customers can no longer collude with dishonest meter readers to cheat the power company.” Awesense, a Vancouver-based company dedicated to confronting energy theft, is taking another approach to put an end to this crime. According to Mischa Steiner-Jovic, CEO of Awesense, “Utilities generate billions of dollars of power every year that they don’t get compensated for and never gets to their customers.” The company’s theft-detection system features a simple device that has the ability to identify where electricity is being diverted. A small sensor can be attached to power lines to measure the amount of current flowing through. The sensor will calculate electricity consumption and deliver the data back to Awesense through their application called SenseNET. Once a comparison of billed electricity and actual consumption is analyzed, the software can then determine if and where theft is occurring. The company is working with utilities located in Turkey, Bulgaria, Malaysia, and the Czech Republic, underlining the fact that electricity theft is becoming a global problem that continues to get worse. Recent incidents have been recorded in a number of different countries. Over the last three years, Ireland’s major energy supplier has noticed a 50 percent growth in offenders tampering with meter boxes. Last year, a man was sentenced to prison after stealing copper wire from a PECO substation. It took about two years for a woman in Connecticut to be caught stealing over $3,000 worth of electricity. Ninety people were suspected as participants of a scheme to help restaurants in Hong Kong lower their utility bills, which eventually cost the utility millions. These are just a few examples of how electricity thieves can be located all over the world and how extreme this type of crime can be. Aside from damage to utilities, electricity theft is a dangerous activity. Tampering with live power lines may result in severe shock, fire, and even death. “Not only is energy theft illegal, it is a safety threat- to those who tamper with electric utility equipment, to the general public and to utility workers who can be injured or killed by hazards left behind by the culprit,” stated Chuck Walls, vice president of customer financial operations of ComEd. Some may think electricity theft is a victimless crime, but judging by Walls’ statement and the effects on innocent customers, that cannot be farther from the truth. Sarah Battaglia Energy Curtailment Specialists, Inc.
  • 27. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 27 Article: Smarter power grids in Turkey! Aurthor: Zeynel A. Öztürk Date: February 15, 2013 This system is to be established in Turkey for 2 years, to solve the root of the problem through great! To take control of energy consumption, increasing Turkey in turned out to be introduced in the new smart grid system. According to reports, the system will be purchased from America, in addition to smart metering devices that produce energy in the right place, but also the power to prevent theft. Which is a new company based in the U.S. Awesense , thieves track for free (income is cut to a certain extent) to monitor the service is offered. Awesense advantage of clamps placed on the power lines, through the induction of electrical current calculates and sends this information back to the center. When the head of the line at the end of the control flow losses, greater than expected found the thief would be. To determine the exact location of the clamps is enough to change the location of the thief. The country's electricity consumption increased by 5 percent in 2012, whereas the increase in electricity production only 4.2 per cent level is increased. Bloomberg 'in Turkey according to the report, this smart line systems in the next two years, $ 5 billion in spending under control electricity consumption by will. In our country, this system will be established as an important model for the countries of the Middle East is expected to be established.
  • 28. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 28 Article: Turkey giant project! Author: Editor Date: February 15, 2013 Smarter power grids in Turkey! This system is to be established in Turkey for 2 years, to solve the root of the problem through great! Increasing energy consumption in Turkey to take control appeared to be introduced in the new smart grid system.According to reports, the system will be purchased from America, smart metering devices, additional will produce energy in the right place, at the same time to prevent the theft of electricity. Awesense is a new company based in the U.S., thieves track for free (income is cut to a certain extent) to monitor the service is offered. Awesense advantage of clamps placed on the power lines, electrical current through the induction of computing and sending the information back to the center. When the head of the line at the end of the control flow losses, greater than expected found the thief would be. To determine the exact location of the clamps is enough to change the location of the thief. our country's electricity consumption increased by 5 percent in 2012, whereas the increase in electricity production is only increased by 4.2 percent level. According to Bloomberg, Turkey, within the next two years by spending $ 5 billion for smart-line systems to control the power consumption. In our country, this system will be established as an important model for the countries of the Middle East is expected to be established.
  • 29. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 29 Article: Awesense’s Wireless Monitoring for Power Grids Goes International Author: Jean Sorensen Date: January / February 2013
  • 30. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 30
  • 31. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 31 Article: Minister Fast Launches New Start-Up Program to Help Canadian Companies Succeed Abroad Author: Editor Date: March 12, 2013 Business development initiative to accelerate growth of innovative cleantech small and medium-sized enterprises abroad March 12, 2013 - The Honourable Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway, announced today in New York City that 10 promising Canadian start-up companies have been selected as the inaugural class for a new Canadian Technology Accelerator (CTA) program for the clean technology (“cleantech”) sector. “Our government’s top priority remains jobs, growth and long-term prosperity,” said Minister Fast. “To support these efforts, we are committed to helping small and medium-sized enterprises succeed abroad. This new Canadian Technology Accelerator program—one of six such programs—brings innovators together with like-minded Canadian companies to accelerate the companies’ access to fast-growing, dynamic markets abroad and in turn create new high-value jobs at home.” Canada’s Canadian Technology Accelerator initiative provides Canadian start-up companies with access to unique resources and contacts that can help them grow internationally. The new program is the first CTA dedicated solely to the fast-growing clean technology sector. It is managed as a joint partnership among the Canadian consulates general in New York City and San Francisco, with the support of the Business Development Bank of Canada and Sustainable Development Technology Canada. By leveraging resources available in New York City and Silicon Valley, participating companies will develop business growth opportunities throughout the United States and globally through access to the global value chains and multinational corporations in these markets and the risk capital that flows through them. REGEN Energy Inc., an industry-leading wireless electrical energy management provider from Ontario, was selected to participate in this new program. “We are thrilled to be selected for the CTA cleantech program because of the impressive calibre of the participants and networks provided by the Canadian consulates general in New York City and San Francisco,” said Tim Angus, President and CEO of REGEN Energy. “We are grateful for this creative initiative and the hands-on assistance provided by Canada’s Trade Commissioner Service, which will help better position us in the competitive U.S. energy market.” Canada’s $10-billion clean technology industry consists of more than 700 technology companies, comprising primarily small and medium-sized enterprises operating in every region of Canada and directly employing more than 52,000 people. While in New York City, Minister Fast also marked the first anniversary of the New York City CTA (CTA@NYC) program for the digital media sector (see Harper Government Helps Launch Canadian Start-Ups in Dynamic New York City Market). “Since its launch in February 2012, the Canadian Technology Accelerator dedicated to the digital media sector has helped 29 high-growth Canadian digital media start-ups tap into the New York market,” said Minister Fast. “Many of these companies have been able to raise venture capital and close new deals—bringing high-value jobs and growth to Canada.” “Being selected by the Canadian government as one of the top technology companies in sports media was a great honour, and our experience in New York has been incredible,” said Greg Bobolo, CEO of SendtoNews and one of the participants in the program. “Our recent digital and broadcast rights negotiations with the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing and the Ladies Professional Golf Association were made easier by our involvement with CTA@NYC.” According to a report by the Information and Communications Technology Council, there are between 2,300 and 3,200 digital media firms in Canada, employing more than 52,000 people and with annual revenues of over $3.5 billion. To learn more about Minister Fast’s visit to New York City, please visit Minister Fast Travels to New York and Washington. A backgrounder follows. For further information, media representatives may contact: Rudy Husny Press Secretary Office of the Honourable Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway 613-992-7332 rudy.husny@international.gc.ca
  • 32. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 32 Trade Media Relations Office Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada 613-996-2000 Follow us on Twitter: @Canada_Trade Backgrounder - Canadian Technology Accelerator Initiative for Clean Technology Sector Participating Companies The following 10 start-up companies were chosen to participate in the launch of the first accelerator program dedicated exclusively to growing Canadian clean technology companies. Awesense Wireless Inc. (British Columbia), Mischa Steiner-Jovic, CEO Awesense Wireless offers a comprehensive and economical solution combining hardware, loss analysis, networking and advanced power monitoring to help utilities identify, characterize and verify power losses from equipment failures as well as power diversion. CarbonCure Technologies Inc. (Nova Scotia), Robert Niven, CEO Working toward carbon-negative concrete, CarbonCure has developed a technology that enables concrete producers to fabricate a greener and stronger concrete product. The technology permanently absorbs post-industrial carbon dioxide into concrete products, creating a unique green alternative for builders and specifiers without material or economic trade-offs for producers. eCAMION Inc. (Ontario), Carmine Pizzurro, CEO eCAMION solutions enable utilities to improve the utilization of electricity grid assets, defer capital expenditures and incorporate renewable energy into the grid. Looking ahead, eCAMION will support infrastructure for charging electric vehicles, as well as provide uninterruptible power and backup power for emergency situations. Effenco (Quebec), David Arsenault, Vice-President, Business Development Garbage trucks are the biggest energy consumers on the road. Effenco’s HEAD (Hydraulic Equipment Assisting Device) hybrid system improves truck fuel economy by 15 to 25 percent, reduces annual emissions of greenhouse gases by 19 to 28 tonnes per truck and increases brake life by 300 percent. Etalim Inc. (British Columbia), Ron Klopfer, CEO Etalim is developing a disruptive technology that uses thermoacoustic physics to generate electricity from any fuel or heat source (including waste heat, sunlight, natural gas, biogas or biomass) with extraordinary efficiency, simplicity and reliability. EnerMotion Inc. (Ontario), Jack MacDonnell, President and CEO EnerMotion has developed a revolutionary hybrid power and energy recovery (HYPER) unit that eliminates the energy-consuming diesel auxiliary power units currently used in heavy trucks. Use of the HYPER unit means that no additional fuel will be consumed or greenhouse gas emissions produced as a result of interior heating and cooling while the truck is in motion or at rest—truck idling during the day and overnight is eliminated. Greengage Mobile (Ontario), Lindsey Goodchild, CEO Ninety-five percent of the world’s largest companies report on sustainability efforts, yet only 12 percent of their employees “buy in” to sustainability goals. Greengage Mobile develops mobile applications that significantly raise employee engagement, while the firm’s robust web analytics platform collects data required for transparent reporting. Odotech Inc. (Quebec), Thierry Pagé, CEO Odotech provides odour-measurement and odour-monitoring systems for industrial sites. Its products include electronic noses, olfactometers, sampling materials and software. Quadrogen Power Systems Inc. (British Columbia), Alakh Prasad, CEO Quadrogen provides a biogas cleanup system that improves the purity of biogas derived from organic waste. By enabling more biogas to generate energy and lowering the incidence of reciprocating engine, turbine or fuel cell failure, the process increases renewable power generation and reduces the environmental impact of waste-to-energy developers. REGEN Energy Inc. (Ontario), Tim Angus, CEO REGEN Energy provides industry-leading wireless electrical demand management and automated demand response solutions to commercial and industrial facilities. The company offers a patented approach that is affordable, is easy to use and maintains the comfort of facility occupants. REGEN’s solutions drastically reduce energy costs while giving customers unprecedented access to load-level data. Canada’s Clean Technology and Digital Media Industries More than 80 percent of Canada’s clean technology companies are exporters. In 2011, export revenues were just over $5 billion, with the United States accounting for 56 percent of these revenues. Canada’s digital media sector is a vibrant, diverse and creative industry. Key Canadian strengths are in video and computer games, development tools, animation and visual effects. In 2010 and 2011, Canada’s video-game industry grew by 11 percent annually, and the growth rate is expected to be 17
  • 33. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 33 percent a year for 2012 and 2013. Between 2003 and 2011, the United States Patent and Trademark Office granted more than 1,000 multimedia-related patents—including more than 300 related to video gaming—to inventors based in Canada. Canadian Technology Accelerator Initiative The Government of Canada’s Canadian Technology Accelerator (CTA) initiative, led by the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service at Canada’s consulates general in San Francisco, New York City and Boston, provides Canadian start-ups in information and communications technologies, digital and social media, gaming, life sciences and clean technologies with access to unique resources and contacts that can help them grow internationally. There are currently five CTA programs, in addition to the one announced today: three located in California (at the Plug and Play Tech Center, Sunnyvale; at RocketSpace, San Francisco; and at the Quantitative Biomedical Center at the University of California, San Francisco’s Mission Bay campus); one in New York (at General Assembly, New York City); and one in Boston (at the Cambridge Innovation Center, Cambridge), which was officially launched on March 11, 2013. These CTAs provide Canadian companies with the opportunity to engage in business development to further their growth in key markets, in addition to accessing key venture funding and entrepreneurial resources available in San Francisco-Silicon Valley, New York City and Boston. More than 170 Canadian companies have benefited from CTAs since the inception of the initiative in San Francisco in 2009. Canadian Trade Commissioner Service Located in more than 150 cities worldwide and in cities across Canada, the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service, part of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, is Canada’s most extensive network of international business professionals. The Trade Commissioner Service helps companies that are looking to export, invest abroad, attract investment or develop innovation and R & D partnerships.
  • 34. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 34 Article: 3 Factors That Could Make or Break the Secondary Transformer Monitor Market Author: Ben Kellison Date: March 5, 2013 Despite rosy forecasts for secondary transformer monitors, major threats to adoption are on the horizon. GTM Research expects the market for secondary transformer monitors to expand rapidly starting in 2014, as technology pilots are concluded. Right now, secondary monitoring vendors are quickly inking public and private deals with other smart grid vendors to position their products for expected future growth -- enabled in part by the wide deployment of field area networks and the recent availability of cheaper AMI network interface cards. Some examples include: AMI vendors including Echelon, Itron, Landis+Gyr, and Silver Spring Networks are partnering with transformer monitoring vendors to ensure interoperability and increase the potential value for existing customers. Additional negotiation and at least one deal has been brought to our attention between monitoring vendors and transformer vendors to embed monitors within new secondary transformers. These enabling factors, coupled with increasing distributed generation penetration, the growing importance of asset management, and the expanding popularity of distribution automation applications, are providing the necessary elements for the secondary monitoring market to grow to more than a half billion dollars by 2018 before stabilizing in 2019. It all seems very rosy for players like Ambient/ABB, Current, Elster, Grid 20/20, GridSense, IUS Technologies, and newcomer Telliformer in the mid- to long-term. However, there are risks that could significantly change the prospects for this market. There are three factors that could create opportunity, threaten to significantly slow growth, or provide major opportunities for savvy vendors. 1. The current competition from other sensors (including AMI and line sensors). This first one is obvious, as the lines from the casual observer between LV and MV sensors often blur together as many of the high-level benefits are the same. The brewing low-voltage/medium- voltage sensor battle in the United States continues to heat up with new entrants like Awesense, Grid Sentry, and South Korean IUS Technologies entering the market over the last year. More than twenty vendors are currently competing to stake claim on a market that continues to lack answers to key questions, including the optimal penetration of sensors on a distribution line, the number of independent sensors that are required if the equipment on feeders is intelligent, and the amount additional value that can be generated from sensors that are more accurate, more precise, poll more frequently than a rival or include more powerful software or processing power. 2. Improving analytics from soft grid (e.g., GRIDiant), AMI (e.g., Silver Spring Networks), and MDMS (e.g., eMeter) providers can reduce the value of transformer monitors through the creation of virtual meters in the short and medium term. Virtual meters can estimate key health parameters at different points on the grid (such as the secondary transformer) to estimate the stress on an asset, the quality of power, the outage status of a device, and assist with identifying theft. Widespread acceptance of these applications rather than direct measures could strip potential marginal hardware sales from the market. 3. Competition or cooperation with combined solid-state monitoring and control devices in the medium and long term. The slow conversion of control equipment to solid-state components from wire-and-magnet equipment will begin to occur in the next five years. If demand develops for these devices to be deployed in a distributed fashion, the likely inclusion of monitoring and communications capabilities could provide an OEM opportunity for low-voltage sensor and communications manufacturers to gain market share. However, by opening up another revenue and value stream versus standalone sensors, it could shut them out altogether. Early indications point to Varentec and Gridco Systems challenging traditional players ABB, GE, and Siemens in this space. The secondary monitoring market is beginning to look promising, as IOUs are starting pilots with greater frequency and prices on economy vendor offerings have fallen to as low as $750 a unit. However, significant challenges from software vendors and disruptive 21st-century solid-state hardware vendors will continue to grow for a market expected to exceed $500 million annually in 2018.
  • 35. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 35 Article: 2013 Cleantech Emerging Rockets Author: Geoffrey Hansen Date: March 12, 2013 The 2013 selections for the Cleantech Emerging Rockets list are as follows: Awesense Wireless Inc. Axine Water Technologies Inc BioVessel Technologies Inc Cooledge Lighting Inc. Diacarbon Energy Inc Etalim Inc. Exro Technologies Inc General Fusion Inc. Kairama Inc Minesense Technologies Ltd Nanozen Inc. Prongineer Research and Development Ltd Article: Federal promote overseas business plan 10 companies received assistance Author: Editor (World News) Date: March 14, 2013 Minister of International Trade Feist on the 12th in New York City announced their ten most promising small and medium sized companies selected into the early days of science and technology to accelerate their projects (CTA) in clean technology projects and will assist them in overseas smoothly. Feist said the government is still the most current focus on creating jobs, improving the economy and long-term prosperity and development, in order to achieve the above objective, the Government must help SMEs overseas development, this project is the six science and technology to help accelerate the development of projects overseas one, so that innovators with like-minded local companies together to accelerate the company's growth, to enter foreign markets, thereby creating new high-value jobs. It is learned that science and technology can accelerate projects for small and medium enterprises to improve their rich and unique variety of resources to help them develop faster to the international arena, this project is by the Canadian Consulate in New York and in San Francisco consulate cooperation, together with with national sustainable development technology and support Business Development Bank of Canada made through the full use of existing resources, in New York City and Silicon Valley, the company will participate in global value chains and multinational companies to understand the market risk capital, which led to development of the company globalization. Was selected to participate in the new program REGEN Energy Inc., is a leading supplier of radio energy management, the company CEO Tim Angus said, "We are delighted to have been selected to participate in CTA clean energy projects, through this creative initiatives and national trade worker assistance will help us better in the competitive positioning of the U.S. energy market harvest. " country over one billion U.S. dollars in clean technology industry by the 700 technology companies, most of which are small and medium enterprises, and direct practitioners personnel more than 52,000 people. Feist also announced the same day, from the science and technology accelerate project since its launch in February 2012, the digital media sector has helped the early 29 digital media companies into the U.S. market, many companies have been able to raise venture capital and the completion of the new deal, and with to high-value jobs and economic growth in order to repay their home countries. Elected to accelerate the clean-tech ten technology companies are: Awesense Wireless, CarbonCure Technologies Inc, eCAMION Inc, Effenco, Etalim Inc, EnerMotion Inc, Greengage Mobile, Odotech Inc, Quadrogen Power System Inc, Regen Energy Inc.
  • 36. Awesense | 1st Quarter media Report | 36 Article: Awesense Launches new service offering Author: Editor Date: Feb- March, 2013 - End -