Strategies in job search process

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  • Key Concept: The facilitator should stress that the resume is highly personalized . There is no one correct way to organize a resume, and writers should never simply copy a resume format. Job applicants should think about what makes them qualified for the position they are seeking, and they should stress these qualifications throughout.
  • Rationale: This presentation addresses the major topics listed above. In some cases, it takes several slides to adequately cover a single topic.
  • Key Concept: Most employers will spend 35 seconds scanning a resume to determine whether to schedule an interview or to discard a resume. These general guidelines will help employers locate information quickly and easily on the resume. Rationale: Writers should try to keep their resume to one page, but should not fill that page completely with information. Using a 10 to 12 point font, adequate spacing, and large margins will ensure that employers can read the resume. Click mouse to reveal each item in the list.
  • Key Concept: It is very important that employers be able to reach the applicant at the address(es) and phone number(s) listed in the heading. If applicants are going through a time of transition and will be moving, they should make it clear on the resume where they will be on any given day. During transitional times, it is a good idea to include a permanent address where someone will always know the applicant’s whereabouts and can locate them.
  • Key Concept: An objective statement should basically include what the writer wants to get out of his or her job, while also suggesting what the writer can do for the company. It tells the employer concisely and quickly what the applicant’s goal is in applying for a position. Rationale: Objective statements are not required, but in general it is a good idea to include one. Defining a specific goal can help applicants target jobs that are closely related to that goal, and it can help employers determine right away whether the applicant’s experience and goal match up with the position the employer is trying to fill. Writers should customize the objective statement for the position and company to which they are applying. Writers can customize their objective statement based on their preliminary research of targeted companies and positions (slide 5). Doing so guarantees that the statement will match up with the company’s expectations. Click mouse to reveal each item in the list.
  • Examples : There are two major pitfalls writers should avoid when writing an objective statement. The first example, above, is so vague that employers cannot garner any information from the statement. Although this is a perfectly fine objective for someone to have, written this way it does not provide any specific information about what “knowledge and expertise” the applicant has or what “different areas” they would like, or are qualified, to work in. The second example, above, demonstrates the second pitfall to avoid. This example stresses only what the company can do for the applicant, rather than what the applicant can do for the company. The third example is the best choice of these three because the applicant is specific about how his or her qualifications could be utilized by the company. Click mouse to reveal each guideline and example.
  • Key Concept: An objective statement should basically include what the writer wants to get out of his or her job, while also suggesting what the writer can do for the company. It tells the employer concisely and quickly what the applicant’s goal is in applying for a position. Rationale: Objective statements are not required, but in general it is a good idea to include one. Defining a specific goal can help applicants target jobs that are closely related to that goal, and it can help employers determine right away whether the applicant’s experience and goal match up with the position the employer is trying to fill. Writers should customize the objective statement for the position and company to which they are applying. Writers can customize their objective statement based on their preliminary research of targeted companies and positions (slide 5). Doing so guarantees that the statement will match up with the company’s expectations. Click mouse to reveal each item in the list.
  • Key Concept: An objective statement should basically include what the writer wants to get out of his or her job, while also suggesting what the writer can do for the company. It tells the employer concisely and quickly what the applicant’s goal is in applying for a position. Rationale: Objective statements are not required, but in general it is a good idea to include one. Defining a specific goal can help applicants target jobs that are closely related to that goal, and it can help employers determine right away whether the applicant’s experience and goal match up with the position the employer is trying to fill. Writers should customize the objective statement for the position and company to which they are applying. Writers can customize their objective statement based on their preliminary research of targeted companies and positions (slide 5). Doing so guarantees that the statement will match up with the company’s expectations. Click mouse to reveal each item in the list.
  • Key Concept: An objective statement should basically include what the writer wants to get out of his or her job, while also suggesting what the writer can do for the company. It tells the employer concisely and quickly what the applicant’s goal is in applying for a position. Rationale: Objective statements are not required, but in general it is a good idea to include one. Defining a specific goal can help applicants target jobs that are closely related to that goal, and it can help employers determine right away whether the applicant’s experience and goal match up with the position the employer is trying to fill. Writers should customize the objective statement for the position and company to which they are applying. Writers can customize their objective statement based on their preliminary research of targeted companies and positions (slide 5). Doing so guarantees that the statement will match up with the company’s expectations. Click mouse to reveal each item in the list.
  • Key Concept: The summary of qualifications statement differs from the objective statement in that it is focused on the skills an applicant has developed rather than on their goal for a specific position. Some employers will always expect to see an objective statement on the resume, so applicants should only use a summary of qualifications statement to replace an objective statement if they are applying to a less traditional company. If an applicant is applying for an internship, a summary of qualifications statement might make more sense to include than an objective statement because the applicant is looking for any position in the company which will train them further, rather than for a specific opening in the company.
  • Example: The student who wrote the summary of qualifications statement above is seeking a summer internship with an aircraft manufacturer. The summary of qualifications statement allows the student to highlight the valuable skills he or she gained working on projects such as those they would work on during their internship. Even though the student may have gained these skills in a classroom or simulated environment, the skills translate into the work environment of the aircraft industry, and listing them helps the student to demonstrate their readiness for the workplace.
  • Key Concept : The education section highlights an applicant’s relevant education. This section may be placed before or after the work experience section of the resume, depending on the amount and quality of an applicant’s work experience. Recent college graduates will usually place this section immediately below their objective statement because it is their strongest qualification for a job. Applicants with substantial work experience may include a relatively brief education section.
  • Key Concept: Writers have several choices in presenting their GPA on the resume. They can leave the GPA off of the resume, although employers may automatically assume that it is lower than it really is. They can include only their “Major GPA,” or their GPA only for those classes required by their major, or they can include their overall GPA, perhaps in combination with the Major GPA. Some other information applicants might include in the education section of the resume if it is relevant are: * Their minor as well as the minor GPA * Academic honors such as the Dean’s List, Summa Cum Laude, etc. * Emphases or concentrations within the major * Special projects completed * Certifications * Special Training Completed * Funding * Relevant Coursework
  • Example: A management student, Terry, took the courses listed above in red to supplement his management degree. He would like to work in sales, and listing these classes helps Terry to support his claim that he has strong communication skills.
  • Key Concept : This section of the resume can go by various names, depending on a writer’s specific experiences and the job for which the writer is tailoring the resume. Some names that writers use are: Work Experience, Employment History, Professional Experience, Qualifying Experience, and Related Experience. Some writers include both volunteer and paid positions in the work experience section; other writers divide these into two sections, such as “Volunteer Experience” and “Employment History.” Writers should customize this section to reflect their strengths and experiences. For more information on customizing and presenting work experiences, see slides 22-29 which discuss several ways to organize information in the resume.
  • Key Concept: A writer’s descriptions should be easy to scan and should demonstrate the writer’s qualifications. Writers should use action phrases and parallel language to make their descriptions as clear as possible.
  • Key Concept: It is best if writers limit their discussion of activities and honors to those most recent, most important, or most relevant to the position for which they are applying. This section can easily be customized for specific positions since applicants will not include all their activities and honors but only those that make the resume stronger. This section can help applicants demonstrate their preparedness for the job for which they are applying, and it can help them demonstrate that their work has been recognized as of a high quality by others. Example: A recent college graduate with a degree in mechanical engineering wants to emphasize the academic honors she received. She includes: Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society General Motors Tuition Scholarship (4 years) Dean’s List (4 semesters) Another recent graduate with a degree in communications is looking for a position in public relations. This graduate wants to emphasize his leadership and organizational skills. Thus, on his resume he includes: Vice-President, Golden Key National Honor Society Copy Editor, Purdue University’s student newspaper Coach, local middle school soccer team
  • Key Concept: Like the activities and honors section of the resume, this section should be included only if the applicant has some significant skill in addition to those expected of the profession. If an applicant has a special skill, they can use this section to stand out from other applicants. Applicants should not include skills that are required or expected for applicants to have.
  • Key Concept: Many times job ads will specify whether or not employers want the names and addresses of applicants’ references included on the resume. Applicants should read job ads carefully to determine how to present their references for any given job. It is a good idea for applicants to compile a separate reference sheet that they can send out along with their resume if references are requested.
  • Key Concept: Applicants should not assume that someone is willing to serve as a reference for them, and they should definitely contact their references before including them on the reference sheet. It is also helpful for applicants to briefly describe how they know a reference on the reference sheet, so that the employer will know the kind of information a given reference can provide.
  • Key Concept: It is rare for any resume to conform strictly to the guidelines for only one resume style. Most resumes will incorporate different styles, and writers should feel free to modify and combine the styles to best highlight their unique qualifications and experiences.
  • Key Concept: This is the most traditional resume style and should be used for jobs which require a high degree of professionalism or by applicants with a long history of relevant work experience.
  • Example: Susan is looking for a supervisory position in the delivery services field, and her work experience in supervision and delivery service are her strongest qualifications. Because she has held relevant positions for a number of years and because there are no gaps during which Susan was unemployed, the reverse chronological style is ideal for her.
  • Key Concept: This is the most common resume style for recent college graduates because its flexibility allows applicants to stress those experiences that relate most to closely to their desired position.
  • Example: Michael, the student in this example, is looking for a consulting position in which he can utilize his research and organizational skills. Because he has performed functions which relate to the position he is seeking, he wants to highlight these functions rather than simply list his employment experience chronologically. Michael draws attention to his most prestigious and relevant experience, serving as a research assistant to a professor, by putting this experience first even though it is not the most recent experience he has had.
  • Key Concept: The skills resume style is ideal for the applicant who has not had very much experience related to the job for which they are applying. The skills resume style allows applicants to demonstrate what they can do and how all their experiences have helped them develop specific, relevant skills.
  • Example: Amy, in the example above, is a recent college graduate seeking a human resources position. Throughout college she worked as a cashier at Wal-Mart and as a volunteer at a local high school, serving as assistant coach and counselor. The skills that she has developed through these experiences are very relevant to her job objective, and the skills format allows her to highlight the related skills she has developed rather than the unrelated experiences she has had. The nature of the positions she has held and the award she won at Wal-Mart suggest that Amy really does possess the skills needed for the position.
  • Key Concept : This resume style can assume a variety of formats depending on the job an applicant is seeking, but it should be used only when an applicant knows that imagination and creativity are valued highly in the field and will be expected on the resume. These types of resumes vary from one another a great deal; consequently, no example of imaginative resume style is provided.
  • Strategies in job search process

    1. 1. Basic Business CommunicationChapter Nine Strategies in the Job-Search Process ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2007
    2. 2. 1-2 Steps in the Job Search Process Build a network of contacts Identify appropriate jobs Find your employer Prepare the application documents Continue job search activities
    3. 3. 1-3Building a Network of Contacts Broaden your circle of friends Get to know your professors Meet business executives Make contacts through internships Work with community organizations
    4. 4. 1-4 Identifying Appropriate Jobs Analyze Yourself -Education -Personal Qualities -Work Experience -Special Qualifications (languages, communications skills) Analyze Outside Factors -Where is the job you are seeking available? -Are you willing to move? -Does the location meet with your lifestyle needs?
    5. 5. 1-5 Finding Your Employer Career Centers (School career centers) Network of Personal Contacts Classified Advertisements Online Sources Employment Agencies Personal Search Agents Web Page Profiles Prospecting
    6. 6. 1-6Preparing the Application Documents The traditional resume The application letter The follow-up and close of the process Other job search letters Continued job search activities
    7. 7. 1-7 What is a resume? A resume is a personal summary of your professional history and qualifications It includes information about your career goals, education, work experience, activities, honors, and any special skills you might have Three types of resume: -Traditional Resume -Scannable Resume -Electronic Resume
    8. 8. 1-8 Resume Workshop General Guidelines Different Styles: Constructing traditional  Organizational Styles resume  Reverse Chronological Heading Style Objective Statement  Functional Style Education  Skills Style Employment Experience  Imaginative Style References
    9. 9. 1-9 General Guidelines Length Limit an entry-level resume to one typed page. Be as concise as possible in stating information Font Avoid fonts smaller than 10 point and larger than 12 point Paper Use 8 1/2” x 11” 20 lb paper. Print your resume with a laser or high quality ink-jet printer.
    10. 10. 1-10 Constructing the Traditional Resume Find out general job information Find out desired qualifications and skills Logically arrange the facts into groups Construct the headings and subheadings Include contact and objective information Present the data for best eye-appeal Organize for strength Write impersonally and consistently Make the form attractive
    11. 11. 1-11 Identifying Information Put your name, permanent and campus addresses, permanent and campus phone numbers, and email address prominently at the top of your resume Avoid using a nickname to identify yourself Consider including your URL address or fax number if you have one RICK NASON 1401-1094 Wellington Street Halifax, NS, Canada, B3H 2Z9 md290513@dal.ca (902) 405-9312
    12. 12. 1-12 Objective Statement 1-3 sentence summary of your area of expertise and career interest Write as complete sentences or as descriptive phrases with minimal punctuation Relate your existing skills directly to the job you are seeking Demonstrate what you can do for the company rather than what they can do for you.
    13. 13. 1-13 Objective Statement Avoid over generalized  Make the statement statements: as specific as -A position allowing me to possible: utilize my knowledge and expertise in different areas. -A position which allows me to apply my Avoid statements that background in focus only on what a engineering and high company can do for you: performance -A position where I gain computing to experience in working on biological problems. biological problems.
    14. 14. 1-14 Presenting InformationSome guidelines List the facts under headings Cover work experience with details Cover education with details When appropriate, show achievements Use action verbs to strengthen the appeal
    15. 15. 1-15 Presenting InformationSome guidelines Avoid information on race, sex, religion, marital status, pregnancy status, citizenship status, age etc Include information on activities and interests that tell about one’s personal qualities Get permission for using referee’s name Use a separate sheet for references Select references that cover your background
    16. 16. 1-16 Presenting InformationSome guidelines Use accurate mailing and email addresses List information without use of personal pronouns Use the same grammatical form for all equal-level headings Choose fonts carefully Use right paper
    17. 17. 1-17 Summary of Qualifications Statement This statement can replace or be used in addition to the objective statement. Write one short paragraph or a bulleted list of qualifications. Use a summary of qualifications statement to emphasize skills you possess that aren’t obvious from your past work experiences.
    18. 18. 1-18 Summary of Qualifications StatementSummary of Qualifications An MBA Major in Finance with expertise in the following areas: -Working as Chief Administrative Officer at Grameen Phone -Communicating with customers in project environments -Working as Associate Consultant with BRAC
    19. 19. 1-19 Education An important section for recent graduates seeking internships or summer jobs. Beginning with the highest level of educational achievement, include information such as university attended, degrees earned, major, minors, grade point average, date of program completion, and so forth.
    20. 20. 1-20 EducationDalhousie University, Halifax, NS, CanadaGraduation October 2007MBA Major in FinanceGPA: 3.98/4.3You do not have to include your GPA on the resume,but if it isn’t included, employers may assume that it islower than it really is.Always state the grade point scale your school is using.
    21. 21. 1-21 Relevant Courses List relevant courses that: -Help you stand out from the crowd -Have provided you with specific skills or knowledge Include this information in the education section: Spanish (4 semesters) Computer Science Business Writing Ethics Only include courses taken in addition to your major or minor Refer to the course by name rather than by number
    22. 22. 1-22 Employment Experience Include positions you have held which are related to the job you are seeking. These might be both paid and volunteer positions Be creative with this section by describing your experiences in the most relevant way possible
    23. 23. 1-23 Employment ExperienceHospitality Intern  Include information such as(May 1999-August 1999) company name and location,Mountain Jacks, HFx, NS job title, dates, and duties-Oversaw the planning, performedproduction, and promptdelivery of food  Make this section easy to read by using spacing and bullets-Assisted in training andretaining new and  Use action phrases toexperienced employees highlight the duties you have-Created a healthy performedatmosphere in restaurant
    24. 24. 1-24Activities and Honors  Include relevant activities and honors that you could discuss with your prospective employer or that have given you valuable experience or skills
    25. 25. 1-25 Specialized Skills Include skills that make you unique, such as computer skills, foreign language skills, or military service Be specific in describing your special skills; name computer programs you know, how long you studied a foreign language, or your dates of military service
    26. 26. 1-26 References In general, do not include the names and addresses of your references Better state that references are available upon request Choose professional references rather than character references
    27. 27. 1-27 Reference SheetDr. Anson  Include the names,Heavilon Hall, Room 226 addresses, and phonePurdue University numbers of your referencesWest Lafayette, IN 47907  Always ask permission(765) 494-3723 before you include any information on your-Dr. Anson is my current reference sheetacademic advisor in the  Consider giving yourCreative Writing and references a copy of your resume so they will beScience Fiction Program prepared to talk to employers
    28. 28. 1-28 Organizing Your Resume Organize your resume The most common to highlight your resume styles are: unique skills and strengths -Organizational style -Reverse chronological Use whatever -Functional combination of organizational styles -Skills you think best highlight -Imaginative your individual qualifications
    29. 29. 1-29Reverse Chronological Resume Style Present your This style is best if: education and work  Job experiences closely experience in parallel the positions chronological order,  There are no periods of beginning with your unemployment time most recent experiences between jobs
    30. 30. 1-30 Reverse Chronological Resume StyleWork Experience:1997-Present U.S. Postal Service, Indianapolis. Worked as a Station Manager, delivering mail, overseeing retail sales, planning delivery to new routes1994-1997 All Right Parking, Inc., Indianapolis. Worked as a Manager, handling customer relations, overseeing accounts, supervising twenty-five employees1992-1994 Indianapolis Star, Indianapolis. Worked as a District Sales Manager recruiting and training new e employees, managing crews of twenty-five carriers within nine counties, designing routes
    31. 31. 1-31 Functional Resume Style Organize experience  Ignore experiences by type of function that do not relate to performed. Under the job for which you each, give specific are applying examples Highlight  Place things in order experiences that of importance rather directly relate to the than chronological job you are seeking order
    32. 32. 1-32 Functional Resume StyleExperience:Research Assistant (May 1998-June 1999)- Purdue U.Assisted Professor Robert Thompson in: -updating statistical tables and charts -answering research questions via the Internet, library, and by establishing resources to provide the needed informationPresident, Sociology Club (January-May 2000) -Raised over $2,000 for club expenses and scholarships -Organized 10 activities for over 200 students -Designed and maintained club website
    33. 33. 1-33 Skills Resume Style Emphasize what you  Ideal style for can do rather than people who have where you have gained valuable worked skills from a variety Try to match your of unrelated skills to the position experiences for which you are applying
    34. 34. 1-34 Skills Resume StyleSkills:Communication Skills-Counseled teens in an anti-drug initiative at Jefferson High School-Received Employee of the Month Award for my work creating a positive environment at Wal-Mart while working as a cashier-Presented a semester-long project on choosing a major to a groupof prospective studentsTraining Skills-Trained new employees in cashier procedures at Wal-Mart-Served as assistant coach for a Scotia High School basketball team
    35. 35. 1-35 Imaginative Resume Style Acts like a mini-  Ideal style when a portfolio because it job demands demonstrates a creativity, such as combination of layout, graphic design graphics, text integration, and  Appropriate to use audience selection color graphics on an Make sure a company imaginative resume is open to this type of resume before submitting it
    36. 36. 1-36 Rick Nason 7431 Davenport Drive(512) 598-9693 Dallas, TX 75226 (512) 598-0017Objective: Administrative Assistant PositionEducation: Bachelor of Science in Office Administration Northern State University, 1991 GPA 3.0/4.0 Special Skills: Keyboarding at 90 wpm, WordPerfect, Word, Ami Pro, Excel and 1-2-3, Paradox and Access Relevant Courses: Business Communication Office Procedures Document Imaging Management
    37. 37. 1-37Experience: Secretary 1996-1998 Boatner King Insurance Company, Dallas Personal secretary to Mr. Carlos Boatner, President Data-entry Clerk 1993-1996 Thatcher Manufacturing Company, Dallas File Clerk 1992-1993 J. C. Douglas Wholesale Company, Dry CreekReferences: Will gladly provide personal and professional references on request.
    38. 38. 1-38 Scannable Resume Constructed to be read by a computer and retrieved when an appropriate position is being filled Can be scanned into a database and retrieved when a position is being filled Objective is to getting the resume reviewed in order to be re-interviewed
    39. 39. 1-39 Scannable ResumeProcedures for Scannable Resume Include industry-specific key words Choose precise nouns over verb actions Present information in a form read accurately by scanners
    40. 40. 1-40 Electronic Resume Enables you to use electronic technology Three basic formats: -ASCII or Text File: -Word Processor, RTF (Rich Text File) and PDF (Portable Document File) -Multimedia HTM File
    41. 41. 1-41 Electronic ResumeProcedures for Electronic Resume Use the electronic format the receiver specifies or prefers Remove all contact information except your email address Consider adding a last updated notation Extend the HTML format to include colors, graphics, video, and sound as appropriate
    42. 42. 1-42 Writing the Cover Messages Writing cover messages involve matching your qualifications with the job They are as good as sales letters Skillfully sell your abilities through them
    43. 43. 1-43Procedure of Writing the Cover Messages Study your product (you) and your prospect (the employer) and think out a strategy for presentation Begin with words that gain attention -begin applying for the job -set up the presentation of your sales point Adapt the tone and content to the job you seek Present your qualifications, fitting them to the job Choose words that enhance the information presented Derive for an appropriate actions (interviews)
    44. 44. 1-44 Handling the Interview Research the employer (company) to impress Make a good appearance through dress and grooming Anticipate questions and plan to answer -Standard, tough, illegal, critical thinking and behavioral questions Make a good impression by being at ease (calm, confident) Help bring out the questions that show your qualifications
    45. 45. 1-45 Preparing your answers helps you choose a strategyQuestion: What are your weaknesses?Possible Strategies: Present a weakness that’s really a hidden strength Cite a corrected weakness Recall a lesson learned Reveal a lapsed skill Use an unrelated skill Cite an objective Try humor Repeat your qualifications
    46. 46. 1-46 Writing Other Job Search Letters Thank-you letter Follow-up letter Job acceptance letter Job refusal letter Job resignation letter
    47. 47. 1-47 Continuing Job Search Activities Maintain your resume Read job ads/ professional journals

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