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Libraries and social networks
 

Libraries and social networks

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Held in Helsinki, Finland.

Held in Helsinki, Finland.

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Libraries and social networks Libraries and social networks Presentation Transcript

      • Social networks
      • - (where) do libraries fit in?
      • Magnus Enger
      • collib.info
      • Helsinki 2008-04-17
  • Some questions to you
    • How many of you have created a profile on Facebook?
    • How many of you have been logged in to Facebook in the last week?
    • How many of you have created a profile on a social network other than Facebook?
  • Social - software or networks?
    • Social software
      • Social features, like the ability to define «friends» or «contacts», but the focus is on something else
      • Example: Flickr
    • Social networks
      • Networking is the main focus
      • Example: Facebook
  • My focus
    • Social networks in libraries
    • Or
    • Libraries in social networks
    • Social networks for librarians
    • Or
    • Social networks «for patrons»
  • Something to remember
    • Libraries should be present where the users are, right?
    • But...
    • «A big difference exists between being where our patrons are and being useful to our patrons where they are.» (Meredith Farkas, my emphasis.)
  • Diversity of social networks
  • Ning.com
    • Create your own social network
    • http://yournetwork.ning.com
    • 1.091 networks as of 2008-04-16, and growing...
    • One «Ning ID» across networks
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  • Facebook
  • Why Facebook?
    • It's the one I know best
    • Pioneered the concept of a «platform» for «applications»
      • Which is interesting in connection with «being useful to our patrons»...
  • Short history
    • Launched in 2004, for students at Harvard
    • Open to everyone from September 2006
    • «Facebook Platform» launched on May 24, 2007
  • Some numbers
    • Norway - network
      • 549.115 members
      • 4.737.200 population
      • 11,6 %
    • Norway - ads
      • 1.127.740
      • 23,8 %
    • Finland - network
      • 395.703 members
      • 5.255.580 population
      • 7,5 %
    • Finland - ads
      • 458.200
      • 8,7 %
  • Some more numbers for Finland
    • Total: 458.200
    • Men: 138.600, women: 204.420
    • 0-15: 2.200
    • 16-20: 74.220
    • 21-25: 157.060
    • 26-30: 121.300
    • 31-35: 58.820
    • 36-45: 32.480
    • 46- : 11.820
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  • Libraries in Facebook - options Profiles Groups Pages Applications
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  • Types of presence
  • Facebook: groups
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  • Facebook: pages
    • Feature probably added because lots of organizations were creating profiles for themselves
    • Works much the same way as a profile
    • Users become «fans», not «friends»
    • Pages can send notifications to fans
    • Fans can choose to receive notifications from pages
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  • Advantages to pages
    • Applications can be added to pages, but not to groups
  • Facebook: applications («apps»)
    • In the beginning
      • Pictures, The Wall
    • Then came the Facebook Platform
      • Made it possible for «third party developers» to create applications
    • Can be added to pages, as well as profiles
    • Examples
      • JSTOR
      • WorldCat
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  • Anatomy of an application
    • Facebook delivers most of the page
    • The application delivers content in a «window» on the page
    • To the user it looks like one, integrated page
    • The application «talks» to Facebook in the background, to get information about the user looking at the page
      • Friends, interests, favourite books – and information about the user's friends...
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  • Successfull applications
    • Spread «virally»
      • «Word of mouth»
      • Newsfeeds show new apps and interactions with apps
      • Built-in methods for recommending apps to friends
    • Emphasize social aspects
      • Interactions among your circle of friends
      • «Challenge your friends to take this quiz»
      • «Tell your friends about this book»
  • Library as conversation
    • (A lot of) people love to talk about books
      • Reviews
      • Discussions
      • Tagging
    • But they don't necessarily do it in the library
    • The Web is rife with book-conversations:
      • Blogs
      • LibraryThing
      • Facebook...
  • Some ideas for applications
    • New books from your library
    • Add books to a bookshelf
    • Tag books
    • Comment, discuss, write reviews, rate
    • «Others who liked this book also liked...»
    • Tell others about a book
    • Book-games
    • And let's not forget journals, articles, DVDs, music...
  • Not just one platform anymore...
    • Alternative platform: OpenSocial
    • Who's in?
      • Google
      • Yahoo!
      • MySpace
  • The war of the platforms? Source: http://www.programmableweb.com/social-platforms-scorecard
  • Focus on infrastructure
    • We need to get our «metadata» out of our systems in a structured way.
      • Feeds (e.g. RSS/Atom)
      • APIs (e.g. SRU)
    • And not just from our catalogues, but from all the services that make up our «collection»
    • We need an abstract «social thing», that can interact with, and collect data from, all sorts of social networks (and other interesting places).
  • Conclusion
    • Social networks are interesting «places» for libraries to provide services.
    • We need to experiment in order to determine what kinds of services can be built, and what our users will actually find useful.
    • We need an infrastructure that will allow us to present our own data in new places with a minimum of effort.
      • THE END
      • Kiitos!
      • [email_address]
      • collib.info
      • www.enger.priv.no