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Data and Analytics in the Digital Age
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Data and Analytics in the Digital Age

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Using data to drive marketing and communications strategy

Using data to drive marketing and communications strategy

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  • I’m Roxanne Joffe – communications leadHow many people are using analytics and data to inform their decision making?Google analyticsSocial mediaHow many/ ‘Data is becoming more and more important in decision making in business. In fact the CMO’s[Harvard Business Review: Powerful strategies that derive from ability to exploit data]There’s hype – quotes from Harvard Business Review
  • However, combining insight and and vision with data is beyond poerful
  • As you can see – there is an overload of resources:Ways to listenWays to engageWays to measure
  • [THEME: CMOs will control larger portions of IT budget and need to learn how to work with CIOs]Big Data is forcing big business to evolve. Big Data is a transformative disruption that is forcing companies to adapt just as they did with the onset of the PC, the Internet and most recently social media and mobile. In fact, in the corporate world, it is now necessary for Chief Marketing Officers and Chief Information Officers to partner in order to connect with today’s consumers.According to IBM’s State of Marketing Report, CMOs are being asked to take on greater portions of the IT budget but are finding it difficult to figure out how to collaborate with IT departments.But what does this mean for Philanthropy?
  • [THEME: Data is well and good, but how does it work for me in Philanthropy?]Philanthropy is evolving, too, to find its own data sweet spot. Educates funders and investorsData can build bridges across foundation departments: Communications, Program, Knowledge/Evaluation (Vanessa will be sharing an example of how this was done at the Foundation Center in a few minutes)Data, when considered from the onset of projects and programs can help us create new ways of sharing social change and progressData in context can illustrate a story that shows the power of investments made in social good and social progress and help with public perception of what foundations do with their resourcesConnecting to grantees in real time and find out what’s meaningful to themHow would this look in your organization? What areas need to converge?Thinking beyond white papers and sharing data in more easily consumed, interactive forms (data visualization, interactive maps and apps)
  • [THEME: Data can help drive decision making, but no one said it was easy]What good is data if it can’t help us drive our decisions? Is this easy? No. Are the problems foundations target very complex? Yes. Using data to inform your decision making is probably a lot harder than the alternative. But the those up to the task are interested in doing the most “good” not simply getting by.Data takes out the guess work and adds validityDuring this session we’ll talk about how to foster an organizational culture that is open to data sharing and analysis Share how foundations and other organizations have taken baby steps to use data to drive communications strategy
  • [THEME: Data can help drive decision making, but no one said it was easy]What good is data if it can’t help us drive our decisions? Is this easy? No. Are the problems and social realities foundations target very complex? Yes. Using data to inform your decision making is probably a lot harder than the alternative. But the those up to the task are interested in doing the most “good” not getting by.During this session we’ll talk about how to foster an organizational culture that is open to data sharing and analysis Share how foundations and other organizations have taken baby steps to use data to drive communications strategyAngela Get into the nuts and bolts
  • Vanessa just shared a great way to educate staff and build a culture of data awareness. Now I’m going to take it a step further and talk about some ways we are using data and analytics to shape communications strategy at The Patterson Foundation. We’re mentioning Google Analytics a lot here because 1) it is free 2) because it is free and almost all of you have websites, it has the greatest reach 3) it gives you many opportunities to mine intel about your website – which is likely your communications centerpiece. What you see here is a screen shot of the first home page for The Patterson Foundation. The foundation launched in 2010 and was established with an unrestricted charter – meaning it has no issue or geographic focus and no grant cycles. But as many of you experience, your foundations aren’t the same (nor should they be) two years down the road.In 18 months the foundation was evolving and morphing so we decided to give it a user experience and design facelift using Google Analytics as our guide.
  • For any organization interested in improving its website, it’s a good idea to go through a quick and dirty checklist that will help you when you’re making sense of analytics.The first item is What’s the goal/what does this exist to do?Goal: For us it was driving people to “what’s new” This meant revamping the home page to bring a news and blog feed front and center, including social media to encourage people to interact with us. Your goal might be driving advocacy around a certain issue. What’s working and what isn’t: For us, we noticed people weren’t really going to our Inspire section and if they did, they weren’t staying long. We felt that people weren’t connecting with the links and content there, so we got rid of that page and started integrating “inspire” concepts into our blogs that were being fed on the home page
  • Today, the site does a better job of sharing what’s current – including the real-time lessons learned from our stable of regular bloggers – the people running and managing our partnership initiatives.As the team of consultants and initiative managers have grown and we realized that because our initiatives are so robust – sharing real time information through blogs. We needed to develop a strategy by looking at what blog posts are most relevant used it in our blogging strategy and that is reflected on our website now.
  • Earlier you heard anjula mention Kpis – Key Performance Indicators – Just wanted to spend a minute talking about KPIs in social media. It doesn’t have to be complicated in social media. KPIsare measures that help you track progress of your objectives. Engagement Conversational exchange through tracking mentions and comments Twitter and FacebookAdvocacy and AudienceTracking reach as an expression as size of network Determine your top referrers Content and Content AmplificationTwitter and Facebook as referral sources to website and landing pages Tracking shares and retweetsAttrition rate – if there are spikes – try to correlate it with activity on your page to understand why
  • Now that we’ve reviewed Kpis, Our next example is about using analytics and data to inform your content strategies. You might have seen the content hamburger before – it was adapted from a 6 layer social media content strategy done by Radian6. You see several layers to content strategyAudience – correlates to reachContent theme – correlates to engagement and content amplificationVoice and tone – also an engagement factor. Format/DeliveryBun – which acts as your channels – can create Kpis for each channel
  • After looking at our own insights, we wanted to focus on engagement and what content seemed to be producing highest engagement rates. We looked beyond likes and noticed spikes in shares occurred with purely visual posts.So we learned that our posting is more effective with visual content like drawing, cartoons, You can test a message and test a visual and see what has greater impact.Extracting meaning from this will help us test new messages – Are people responding to the visual aspect, the message or a combination? Maybe this means we take a more inspirational tone when communicating.
  • While some information you gather from Facebook is intuitive you can also access features like x.y.z that inform kpis. We’ve shared a lot of information about setting goals, extracting data and making meaning out of them. But what tools are going to help you do all of this?We’ll highlight a few here with the rest available on your handouts.
  • Hand back to Anjula or Vanessa

Transcript

  • 1. Analytics in a Digital Age: Using data to drive marketing and communications strategy#Comnetwork12 #datacom
  • 2. October 2012
  • 3. “Data’s power does not erase the need for vision orhuman insight.” - Harvard Business Review
  • 4. Educates funders and investors (What do we think vs. What do we know)Bridges departmentsInspires new ways of sharing and interactingDemonstrates power of social good investmentsEngages grantees in the design of programs
  • 5. Sound familiar?
  • 6. Spreadsheet Hell I need to make a new spreadsheetto keep track of all of my spreadsheets.
  • 7. Analytical Agility THINKSEE MODIFY
  • 8. Audience needs:Why are they here?• What are they attempting to do?How are they different from us?• What jargon do they know/not know?• How much time do they have?• What are their biases/hopes/dreams?If we are successful in communicating with them:• What questions can they answer?• What actions can they take?
  • 9. WHO WHAT WHEN HOW “BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE”
  • 10. Why does this website exist? Look at analytics quarterly to spot trends What’s working and what isn’t? Making sense of user* This is a Star Trek reference. Get it? behaviorNo? OK! I digress.
  • 11. Beyond likes:- Shares- CommentsTest messages in new formatsbased on trends in analytics:-Create our own branded visualinspiration- Share program data in contextas infographics instead ofcreating white papers
  • 12. Free Analytics ToolFeatures: Reach; Talking About; Engaged Users; ViralityFree Quick Analytics and Paid Custom VersionsFeatures: Top Referrers; Most Popular Links Free Analytics Tool Features: Reach, Viral Nature of Pins; Klout– like score
  • 13. Free Analytics ToolFeatures: Social Analytics; Content Analytics; Analysis Paid Tool Features: Heat maps let you see “what works” at a glance
  • 14. Free Community; Pay for Designers Features: World’s largest community of infographics and data visualization.Free Analytics Dashboard ToolFeatures: Create separate dashboards for everythingfrom Google Analytics to Twitter. Allows you to makecomparisons with data and create stories.