That Conference Date and Time

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That Conference Date and Time

  1. 1. DATE ANDTIME Odds, Ends, and Oddities
  2. 2. About Me www.maggiepint.com @maggiepint maggiepint@gmail.com
  3. 3. https://xkcd.com/1597/
  4. 4. Like Git: • Date and time is complicated • At first, we avoid learning date and time But also, like Git: • Date and time makes sense • Date and time can be fun
  5. 5. 5 O'clock Somewhere
  6. 6. PERSPECTIVE We all see dates and times from different angles
  7. 7. The GlobalTimeline 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Point in absolute time
  8. 8. Coordinated UniversalTime (UTC) • A perspective of the global timeline • Allows us to keep track of absolute time • Primary standard by which the world regulates clocks • Defined precisely by scientific community • Includes leap seconds • Has no relationship to geography • Basically the same as GMT, but GMT is not defined precisely by the scientific community
  9. 9. LocalTime • A local time is a perspective of time • It does not represent a point on the global timeline • It is usually not a contiguous timeline (DST)
  10. 10. UTC Time: 2016-04-09T14:17:47Z What we know • The point in absolute time • Whether this time is before or after another point in time What we don’t know • Whether it is morning or night • What day of the week it is
  11. 11. LocalTime: Saturday,April 9, 2016 9:11 AM We Know • It is Saturday • It is morning We Don’t Know • What point this is on the global timeline • Whether it is before or after a time from a different locality • What the time will be if we add one hour to this time
  12. 12. TIME ZONES Uniting Perspectives
  13. 13. Time Zone Basics • A time zone is a region that observes a uniform standard time • A time zone is defined by a set of offsets from UTC • Offsets are typically in one hour intervals, but not always • Nepal StandardTime is UTC +5:45 • Time zones frequently have multiple offsets • There are two main resources for time zones • Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) • WindowsTime Zones • IANA time zones are more widely used, and more accurate
  14. 14. Time Zone: America/Chicago
  15. 15. Politics • Time zones are inherently political • Governments change time zones regularly • Governments change time zones suddenly • Russia this year is an example of politicians causing time chaos • http://bit.ly/1SB9TvW • Morocco reverts to standard time during Ramadan • Assume nothing
  16. 16. IANATime Zone Libraries • JavaScript - MomentTimeZone • http://momentjs.com/timezone/ • .NET – NodaTime • http://nodatime.org/ • Java 8 + - java.time (native) • Java 7 - JodaTime • See Stack Overflow post for more exhaustive list • http://bit.ly/1RUYuuM
  17. 17. Time Zones are not Offsets! "2016-04-09T19:39:00-05:00“ This date could be in: • America/Chicago • America/Bahia_Banderas • America/Bogata • America/Cancun • America/Cayman • And more
  18. 18. ASSUMPTIONS Things we think we know
  19. 19. Assumption “If you just store everything in UTC, all your problems will be solved.”
  20. 20. ATableWith Everything in UTC
  21. 21. Show me all the messages for the business day of April 4th. I have users in London, and across the United States. In LondonApril 4th is between 2016-04-03 23:00:00Z and 2016-04-04 22:59:59Z In MinneapolisApril 4th is between 2016-04-04 05:00:00Z and 2016-04-05 04:59:59Z
  22. 22. Perspectives • When storing a date, consider the following perspectives • Absolute time • Time local to the date’s viewer • Time local to the date’s originator
  23. 23. 2016-04-09T20:18:48-05:00 ISO 8601 Format with Offset Local Date LocalTime Offset
  24. 24. Why use ISO 8601 format? • With offset, reflects both local and absolute perspective • Has unambiguous ordering • Compare this to 4/10/2016 • In the US this is April 10th • In the UK this is October 4th • Helps avoid having to compute local perspective from absolute during querying • Supported by nearly all modern databases • Databases will automatically order in absolute time
  25. 25. Assumption “If I just store everything in ISO 8601 with an offset, everything will be fine.”
  26. 26. Future Dates • Time zones change over time • In the future, the offset of a scheduled time could change • Store future dates in local time with a time zone
  27. 27. Assumption “There are 24 hours in a day, and 365 days in a year.”
  28. 28. moment('2016-03-12 12:00').add(1, 'day').format('LLL') "March 13, 2016 12:00 PM" moment('2016-03-12 12:00').add(24,'hour').format('LLL') "March 13, 2016 1:00 PM"
  29. 29. moment('2016-02-28').add(365, 'days').format('LLL') "February 27, 2017 12:00 AM" moment('2016-02-28').add(1, 'year').format('LLL') "February 28, 2017 12:00 AM"
  30. 30. As Seen on Stack Overflow var startHours = 8; var startMinutes = 30; var ed = new Date(); var endHours = ed.getHours(); var endMinutes = ed.getMinutes(); var elapsedMinutes = (endHours * 60 + endMinutes) - (startHours * 60 + startMinutes); console.log(elapsedMinutes);
  31. 31. Assumption “Time and date math work in the same way.”
  32. 32. moment('2016-01-01').add(1.5, 'hours').format('LLL') "January 1, 2016 1:30AM“ moment('2016-01-01').add(1.5, 'days').format('LLL') "January 3, 2016 12:00 AM"
  33. 33. Time Math vs Date Math Time math: • Refers to operations involving hours, minutes, seconds, milliseconds • Works by incrementing or decrementing the position on the global timeline by the number of units in question • Can use fractional units Date Math: • Refers to all operations larger than hours – days, months, years, quarters, etc. • Works by moving places on the calendar • Cannot be converted to time math • Cannot use fractional units
  34. 34. Assumption “All dates and times exist once in all time zones”
  35. 35. moment('2016-10-16').format('LLL') October 16, 2016 1:00 AM
  36. 36. Spring Forward in JavaScript
  37. 37. Fall Back in JavaScript
  38. 38. Samoa • Samoa is very close to the international date line • Samoa found itself trading more frequently with Australia than America • Samoa switched sides of the international date line • December 30 2011 does not exist in Samoan time
  39. 39. Assumption “The Date object in JavaScript works.”
  40. 40. var a = new Date('2016-01-01'); a.toString(); "Thu Dec 31 2015 18:00:00 GMT-0600 (Central StandardTime)" var a = new Date('1/1/2016'); a.toString(); "Fri Jan 01 2016 00:00:00 GMT-0600 (Central StandardTime)"
  41. 41. Known JavaScript Date Issues • DSTTransitions can go both directions • Months index from zero • No support for time zones other than user’s local time zone and UTC • Older browsers know only current DST rules • Parsing is implementation specific and basically completely broken • The spec is a disaster http://codeofmatt.com/2013/06/07/javascript-date-type-is- horribly-broken/
  42. 42. MOMENT.JS Quality Date andTime in Javascript
  43. 43. Parsing • Consistently parses date values according to your expectations • More than 100 languages supported • Thousands of options for parse-able formats • Parse multiple formats if necessary
  44. 44. moment('2016-12-21T13:25:22').format() "2016-12-21T13:25:22-06:00" moment('30/04/2016', 'DD/MM/YYYY').format() "2016-04-30T00:00:00-05:00" moment('February 25, 2016', 'MMMM DD, YYYY').format() "2016-02-25T00:00:00-06:00" moment('octubre 25, 2016', 'MMMM DD, YYYY', 'es').format() "2016-10-25T00:00:00-05:00"
  45. 45. Formatting • Highly configurable format options • Locale based formatting functions
  46. 46. moment().format('MM/DD/YYYY') "04/26/2016" moment().format('MMMM D, YYYY hh:mm a') "April 26, 2016 09:26 pm"
  47. 47. moment().format('LLL') "April 26, 2016 9:28 PM" moment().format('L') "04/26/2016" moment().locale('en-gb').format('L') "26/04/2016" moment().locale('ar').format('LLL') "٢٦‫أبريل‬ ‫نيسان‬٢٠١٦٢١:٣١"
  48. 48. Sane Math • Add and subtract any unit • StartOf/EndOf • Difference
  49. 49. var a = new Date(); a.setDate(a.getDate() - 5); moment().subtract(5, 'days');
  50. 50. var d = new Date(); var diff = d.getDate() - d.getDay() + (day == 0 ? -6:1); d.setDate(diff); d.setHours(0,0,0,0); moment().startOf('week')
  51. 51. var d1 = new Date(); var d2 = new Date(01/01/2016); var months; months = (d2.getFullYear() - d1.getFullYear()) * 12; months -= d1.getMonth() + 1; months += d2.getMonth(); var diff = months <= 0 ? 0 : months; moment().diff('2016-01-01', 'months');
  52. 52. RelativeTime moment().subtract(3, 'months').fromNow() "3 months ago" moment().subtract(2, 'seconds').fromNow() "a few seconds ago" moment().add(4, 'hours').locale('tlh').fromNow() "loS rep pIq" Over 100 locales.This is Klingon.
  53. 53. Time Zones (With MomentTimeZone) moment.tz('2016-04-25T02:30:00Z', 'America/Los_Angeles').format() "2016-04-24T19:30:00-07:00" moment.tz('2016-04-25T02:30:00Z', 'Europe/Berlin').format() "2016-04-25T04:30:00+02:00"
  54. 54. IN SUMMARY We all know what happens when you assume
  55. 55. CONSIDER ALL PERSPECTIVES
  56. 56. DISTINGUISH BETWEEN LOCAL AND ABSOLUTETIME
  57. 57. REMEMBER,TIME ZONES CHANGE RAPIDLY
  58. 58. STORE FUTURE DATES IN LOCALTIME
  59. 59. DISTINGUISH BETWEEN DATE MATH ANDTIME MATH
  60. 60. DON’TTRUST JAVASCRIPT DATE
  61. 61. USE A QUALITY LIBRARY
  62. 62. MAKE NO ASSUMPTIONS
  63. 63. Be like this guy:
  64. 64. Additional Resources • Date andTime Fundamentals – Matt Johnson, Pluralsight • https://www.pluralsight.com/courses/date-time-fundamentals • Matt Johnson’s Blog • http://codeofmatt.com/ • LauTaarnskov’s Blog • http://www.creativedeletion.com/ • NodaTime’s Documentation • http://nodatime.org/ • Time Programming Fundamentals – Greg Miller CPPCon 2015 • http://bit.ly/1SgO3E0 • Moment.js • http://momentjs.com/
  65. 65. About Me www.maggiepint.com @maggiepint maggiepint@gmail.com https://github.com/maggiepint

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