General mechanism of muscle contraction

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General mechanism of muscle contraction

  1. 1. GENERAL MECHANISM OF MUSCLE CONTRACTION Sequential steps of initiation and execution of muscle contraction
  2. 2. MUSCLE CONTRACTION1. An action potential travels along a motor nerve to its endings on muscle fibers.
  3. 3. 2. The nerve secretes a small amount of the neurotransmitter substance – acetylcholine at each ending.
  4. 4. 3. The acetylcholine acts on a local area of the muscle fiber membrane to open multiple “acetylcholine –gated” cation channels through protein molecules floating in the membrane.
  5. 5. 4. Opening of the acetyl-gated channels allows large quantities of sodium ions to diffuse to the interior of the muscle fiber membrane . This causes a local depolarization that in turn leads to opening of voltage-gated sodium channels. This initiates action potential at the membrane.
  6. 6. 5. The action potential travels along the muscle fiber membrane in the same way that action potentials travel along nerve fiber membranes.
  7. 7. 6.The action potential depolarizes the muscle membrane, and much of the action potential electricity flows through the center of the muscle fiber. Here it causes the sarcoplasmic reticulum to release large quantities of calcium ions that have been stored within this reticulum.
  8. 8. 7. The calcium ions initiate attractive forces between the actin and myosin filaments, causing them to slide alongside each other, which is the contractile process.
  9. 9. 8. After a fraction of a second, the calcium ion are pumped back into the sarcoplasmic reticulum until a new muscle action potential comes along; this removal of calcium ions from the myofibrils causes the muscle contraction to cease.
  10. 10. MOLECULARMECHANISM OF MUSCLE CONTRACTION
  11. 11. Sliding Filament Mechanism of Muscle Contraction In contracted state, actin (thin) filaments have been pulled inward among the myosin (thick) filaments, so their ends overlap one another to their maximum extent.
  12. 12. Sliding Filament Mechanism of Muscle Contraction• Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism.• When action potential travels along the muscle fiber, sarcoplasmic reticulum release large quantities of calcium ions that rapidly surround the myofibrils.• Energy is needed for the contractile process to proceed. (ATP to ADP)
  13. 13. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• Myosin filaments is made up of 200 or more individual myosin molecules.
  14. 14. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments arm Cross-bridges hinges body
  15. 15. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• Body- bundled tails of myosin molecules.• Arm- extends the head outward from the body.• Head- globular polypeptide structure.• Cross-bridges- heads and arms together.• Hinges- flexible point of a cross-bridge.
  16. 16. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• The total length of each myosin filament if uniform, almost exactly 1.6 micrometers.• The distance between cross-bridges and body is 0.2 micrometers.• Myosin filament itself is twisted from the previous pair by 120 degrees ensuring that cross-bridges are extended in all directions around the filament.
  17. 17. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• Myosin molecule is composed of 6 polypeptide chains. – 2 heavy chains • Molecular weight of 200,000 each • Double helix • Tail – Ends: head – 4 light chains • Molecular weight of 20,000 each • Part of myosin head (2 at each head) • Help control the function of the head during muscle contraction.
  18. 18. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• ATPase activity of the Myosin Head – The myosin head functions as an ATPase enzyme.• Actin Filaments are composed of Actin, Tropomyosin, and Troponin. – The double stranded F-actin protein molecule • backbone of the actin filament • wounded in a helix • (each strand) is composed of polymerized G-actin molecules.
  19. 19. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• G-actin molecule has a molecular weight of about 42,000.• One molecule of ADP is attached to each of it.• Each actin filament is about 1 micrometer long.• The bases of the actin filaments is inserted strongly into the Z-discs.
  20. 20. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments
  21. 21. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• Each molecule of tropomyosin found in the actin filament has a molecular weight of 70,000 and a length of 40 nanometers.• These molecules are wrapped spirally around the sides of the F-actin helix.• In the resting stage, the tropomyosin molecules lie on top of the active sites of the actin strands.
  22. 22. Molecular Characteristics of the Contractile Filaments• Attached intermittently along the sides of the tropomyosin molecule is the troponin molecule.• There are three subunits: – Troponin 1: has strong affinity for actin – Troponin T: for tropomyosin – Troponin C: for calcium ions

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