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Meredith Dezutter - Aligning New Care Models with the Patient of the Future
 

Meredith Dezutter - Aligning New Care Models with the Patient of the Future

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The patient of the past is not the patient of the future.

Mayo Clinic is currently engaged with the Center for Innovation in a multi-year initiative to redesign their outpatient practice, a necessary step for any large healthcare provider who hopes to be relevant and financially aligned with the future. The organizational and operational design of the current clinic has been influenced by the patient of the past and their medical needs. From our exploration, we hypothesize that today’s patient is significantly different from the patient of the past and new care models should better support the needs, goals, motivations, and emotions of these new patients. Additionally, we believe that the patient of today will continue to change, allowing us to consider a new paradigm of flexible, evolving care models that continue to adapt to the changing needs of patients.

The goal of this presentation will be to share how the current patient and patient of the future differs from the patient of the past and tie these findings to the on-going design explorations being conducted at Mayo Clinic.

Meredith DeZutter is a Senior Service Designer at the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation. Her work focuses on designing new healthcare services, products, and experiences across the clinic by understanding the intersection and connections between existing systems with disruptive landscape drivers.

In addition to her work at Mayo Clinic, Meredith has over 15 years of global consulting experience in identifying and developing innovative design solutions for both products and systems. Meredith has led design research and strategy efforts for project teams for organizations such as Kent Hospital, Becton Dickinson, Herman Miller for Healthcare, and Thoratec Corporation, among others. Additionally, she has delivered lectures and papers on new ideas and methodologies in design research and strategy to corporations, professional societies, and exhibitions.

Meredith has a BFA in Industrial Design from Carnegie Mellon University. Prior to working at Mayo Clinic, she was the Director of Research at Ximedica as well as the Director of Design Strategy at Insight, both design consultancies focused on healthcare service design and medical products.

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    Meredith Dezutter - Aligning New Care Models with the Patient of the Future Meredith Dezutter - Aligning New Care Models with the Patient of the Future Presentation Transcript

    • HEALTHCARE EXPERIENCE DESIGN CONFERENCE 2012Aligning New Care Modelswith the Patient of the FutureMeredith DeZutter Center for Innovation at Mayo Clinic
    • THE CENTER FOR INNOVATION- PLATFORMS The work at the Center for Innovation focuses on paradigm shifts in healthcare; we use PRACTICE human-centered, participatory REDESIGN research and design methodologies CARE AT A COMMUNITY DISTANCE HEALTH© 2012 MFMER
    • MISSION AND CORE VALUES “The needs of the patient come first” PRACTICE REDESIGN CARE AT A COMMUNITY DISTANCE HEALTH© 2012 MFMER
    • DEFINING THE PATIENT The health continuum highlights the patient perspective© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING FRAMEWORK: STEEP [M] The STEEP [M] methodology is used in forecasting work to understand the forces that surround people to understand trends and drivers Social Medical Technology Political Economic Environ.© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PAST: 1930’s Looking into the past, what external forces influenced the patient of the 1930’s…© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PAST: 1930’s Looking into the past, what external forces influenced the patient of the 1930’s…SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTALECONOMIC & POLITICAL Lifespan 62 • SS Act, New Deal for Great Depression economic recovery • Authoritarian• Unemployment regimens in Europe• Radio / some TV • 1939 WWII••TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL• New materials; • Some vaccinations nylon, synthetic Tuberculosis, measles, rubber polio• New machinery; • No antibiotics helicopter, jet • X-Ray engine • Physician solo expert © 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PAST - IMPLICATIONS What trends can we discern about the patient of the 1930’s based on this quick review? - A time of uncertainty; people allowed institutions / government to control their lives - Large institutions / government worked to standardize, one large system for all - Information lacking; many did not play an active role in making health and other personal decisions - Limited options for products and services - Experiences created and distributed by others© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Approximately 200 trends identified© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: One person delivering diagnosis  Crowdsourcing diagnosis on the NYT Well Blog of complex medical cases  All welcome to respond not just physicians  Also seen in the Slate posting “How Facebook Saved My Son’s Life”© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: Care, support, and information can only come from health care institutions and physicians  Social networking site  Members share conditions and treatments over time  Data collected can be powerful in the future© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: Large institutions have monopolies / control over people  Microloans or credit that people can provide to others; disruptive innovation in finance and healthcare  Often empower people who may not receive loans from banks  2009 estimated 74 million recipients© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: Health is only a medical condition; social and economic conditions are not related  Nonprofit embedded in hospitals in 6 cities  Connects low-income patients with basic resources (food, housing, or other resources) to be healthy© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: Access to systems have fixed locations  Delivery of computing as a service or utility rather then product  New system implications for EMR and other key healthcare systems such as ordering and billing© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: One person delivering diagnosis  Super computer as a diagnostic tool to complement care team  IBM currently working with WellPoint to diagnose and provide treatment options  At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Watson will be used as a decision support tool for clinicians© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: The ability to monitor your body at home and make decisions about health without consulting a physician  Wear at night to gather data on sleep patterns to improve sleep quality  Provides alarm clock that measures brain activity to wake user at optimal time© 2012 MFMER
    • FORECASTING RESEARCH: TREND CARDS Orthodoxy challenged: Physically seeing patients is the best and only way to provide diagnosis  Data is power – date mining allows us to discover new patterns from large data sets  Appropriate for predictive modeling and preventing acute conditions  Will challenge what information we capture in the future© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PRESENT & FUTURE How are these forces shaping the patient of today and the future?© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PRESENT & FUTURE How are these forces shaping the patient of today and the future? SOCIAL • Aver. Lifespan 78; aging population • Social media, communities connecting people and services • User-created content • On-demand entertainment, services, and media© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PRESENT & FUTURE How are these forces shaping the patient of today and the future? SOCIAL • Aver. Lifespan 78; aging population • Social media, communities connecting people and services • User-created content • On-demand entertainment, services, and media ECONOMIC • Global economy in recession • The rise of China and India • SS and gov’t healthcare unsustainable© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PRESENT & FUTURE How are these forces shaping the patient of today and the future? SOCIAL • Aver. Lifespan 78; aging population • Social media, communities connecting people and services • User-created content • On-demand entertainment, services, and media ECONOMIC • Global economy in recession • The rise of China and India • SS and gov’t healthcare unsustainable ENVIR. & POLITICAL • The “Occupy” movement • Arab Spring • Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [2010] • ACO’s© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PRESENT & FUTURE How are these forces shaping the patient of today and the future? SOCIAL TECHNOLOGICAL • Aver. Lifespan 78; aging population • Cloud computing • Social media, communities • Computer assisted decision- connecting people and services making (Watson) • User-created content • Portable diagnostics • On-demand entertainment, • Nanotechnology services, and media • Ubiquitous sensors ECONOMIC • Global economy in recession • The rise of China and India • SS and gov’t healthcare unsustainable ENVIR. & POLITICAL • The “Occupy” movement • Arab Spring • Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [2010] • ACO’s© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT OF THE PRESENT & FUTURE How are these forces shaping the patient of today and the future? SOCIAL TECHNOLOGICAL • Aver. Lifespan 78; aging population • Cloud computing • Social media, communities • Computer assisted decision- connecting people and services making (Watson) • User-created content • Portable diagnostics • On-demand entertainment, • Nanotechnology services, and media • Ubiquitous sensors ECONOMIC • Global economy in recession • The rise of China and India MEDICAL • SS and gov’t healthcare Chronic disease unsustainable Individualized medicine • Regenerative medicine ENVIR. & POLITICAL • Rise of retail clinics • The “Occupy” movement • • Arab Spring • • Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [2010] • ACO’s© 2012 MFMER
    • PATIENT COMPARISIONS How does the patient of the past align with the patient of the future? TRENDS: PATIENT OF TRENDS: PATIENT OF PAST PRESENT & FUTURE Institutions / government control; Questioning / rejecting large intuitions worked to standardize, one system and authority   for all Unaccepting of standardization Non-questioning of authority Ability to access information  Lack of health information Multiple options for products and   Limited options for products and services   services Create own experiences and choose  Experiences and information created when and where they occur  and distributed by others © 2012 MFMER
    • IMPACT TO MAYO CLINIC What do our learnings about the patient of the today and the future mean for health care?© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 1: One size does not fit all IMPACT TO MAYO CLINICDifferent patient types have different needs© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 1: One size does not fit all IMPACT TO MAYO CLINICMedical need is the foundation but not enough© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 1: One size does not fit all IMPACT TO MAYO CLINICIndividualized medicine will change processes© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 2: Power to the people IMPACT TO MAYO CLINICProviding care for people that aligns around their need andempowers them to make decisions1) Many not aligned with the needs of the patients; organizational structure represents the physician training2) Patients a critical part of care team; given information to make decisions3) Appointments and interactions should be arranged and scheduled around the patient not the availability of clinicians or access to departments© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 3: It takes a village IMPACT TO MAYO CLINIC© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 3: It takes a village IMPACT TO MAYO CLINIC© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 4: Build connections and IMPACT TO MAYO CLINICrelationships, not buildings© 2012 MFMER
    • Principle 4: Build connections and IMPACT TO MAYO CLINICrelationships, not buildings© 2012 MFMER
    • We need to keep FUTURE WORKmoving forward, atMayo Clinic we will:1) Continue to understand the needs of the patients through ethnographic research2) Experiment with new ideas within the practice; clinical lab opening this summer where we can experiment with new ideas© 2012 MFMER
    • LAST THOUGHT We are all patients and should create the system and experiences we want; what would you like to see?© 2012 MFMER