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SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report
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SOURCING at MAGIC: A/W 2014-2015 Design Trend Report

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Design – whether it be for fashion, home or any lifestyle vertical – is built upon FORECASTING. As a result, we’ve built multi-million dollar businesses upon the ability to predict and tell designers, …

Design – whether it be for fashion, home or any lifestyle vertical – is built upon FORECASTING. As a result, we’ve built multi-million dollar businesses upon the ability to predict and tell designers, companies, and marketers what people want, before they consciously realize they want it.
 
Forecasting is FUTURECASTING and, as futurecasters, we’re interpreting and anticipating what consumers will want to purchase. We scan tens of thousands of images, look at historical purchase data and patterns, as well as look for predictive indicators of what’s coming next. It’s why every six months, we have fashion weeks and trades shows. Every six months, we show what’s coming next – though we have ideas of what’s coming two, three and even five years out.
 
There are still those who ask, “Where does it all start? Where is the source of inspiration for what comes down the runways and is available in your favorite department stores?”
 
This season, SOURCING at MAGIC partnered with WHY THIS WAY and Woodbury University's Fashion Marketing Department to research consumer behavior and its influence on textiles. From this collaboration, we’ve created a first of its kind trend report that highlights of what finished products will be comprised. We look at the elements that make up finished designs and trends aligned to current consumer purchase behavior to paint a picture of what’s coming next.
 
So, if you see how Mad Men has impacted consumers’ need for heritage and CRAFTSMANSHIP or how The Hunger Games is driving MODERN, don’t worry, that’s exactly what you’re supposed to see.
 
This concept report focuses on consumer interest for the next year (2014 – 2015). We not only highlight the materials (textiles, trims, treatments, but highlight the consumer needs and interests. We’ve introduced ‘Sources’ from vendors found at SOURCING at MAGIC that are offering the best of the materials to create these concepts for multiple markets. So whether you’re a car manufacturer, menswear designer or interior design company, this is applicable to you. We you enjoy the creative insights found within this CONCEPT REPORT.

For more information on SOURCING at MAGIC, visit: http://www.magiconline.com/sourcing-at-magic

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  • 1. A/W 2014 – 2015 Trend Concept Report
  • 2. Fall/Winter 2014 – 2015 Concept Report Design – whether it be for fashion, home or any lifestyle vertical – is built upon FORECASTING. As a result, we‟ve built multi-million dollar businesses upon the ability to predict and tell designers, companies, and marketers what people want, before they consciously realize they want it. Forecasting is FUTURECASTING and, as futurecasters, we‟re interpreting and anticipating what consumers will want to purchase. We scan tens of thousands of images, look at historical purchase data and patterns, as well as look for predictive indicators of what‟s coming next. It‟s why every six months, we have fashion weeks and trades shows. Every six months, we show what‟s coming next – though we have ideas of what‟s coming two, three and even five years out. There are still those who ask, “Where does it all start? Where is the source of inspiration for what comes down the runways and is available in your favorite department stores?” This season, SOURCING at MAGIC partnered with WHY THIS WAY and Woodbury University's Fashion Marketing Department to research consumer behavior and its influence on textiles. From this collaboration, we‟ve created a first of its kind trend report that highlights of what finished products will be comprised. We look at the elements that make up finished designs and trends aligned to current consumer purchase behavior to paint a picture of what‟s coming next. So, if you see how Mad Men has impacted consumers‟ need for heritage and CRAFTSMANSHIP or how The Hunger Games is driving MODERN, don‟t worry, that‟s exactly what you‟re supposed to see. This concept report focuses on consumer interest for the next year (2014 – 2015). We not only highlight the materials (textiles, trims, treatments, but highlight the consumer needs and interests. We‟ve introduced „Sources‟ from vendors found at SOURCING at MAGIC that are offering the best of the materials to create these concepts for multiple markets. So whether you‟re a car manufacturer, menswear designer or interior design company, this is applicable to you. We you enjoy the creative insights found within this CONCEPT REPORT.
  • 3. The Countries and Trends of Interest In February 2014, we surveyed 175 buyers, designers, media and press writers, and brand representatives to discover the trends and countries found within this report.
  • 4. TREND // MODERN + ORGANIC
  • 5. // CONSUMER ANALYSIS // The modern + organic concept is based on consumers‟ desire to balance technology and ecology; it represents cultural reactions of moving into the modern lifestyle while building multiple aspect of sustainability into it. This trend highlights the ideals of modern living by connecting them with the emotional aspects of the environment around them. It also represents the development of an aesthetic perception as a part of the reaction to organic influence in art and design. Organic in shape and form as opposed to organic materials. The modern component can be presented by experimenting with pleats (as seen with Issey Miyake). This concept is also based around irregular effects of a material that add organic (botany, flowers, vines) inspiration around the human body.
  • 6. This new way of introducing minimalists comes from the organic approach to design. The folds, darts, and pleats add points and angles to provide a new surface give a new geometry to the design. The organic materials are now being simulated into the design elements. Intangible Elements tied to Emotional Purpose: Modern Line Theory: one with nature and/or reclaiming materials Generation of innovators Elements that blur the lines between nature and modern design Space theory; Image-makers collaborate with multiple disciplines Convergence of sustainability Aware of the geometry of the human frame; use of geometry helps to generate forms and create a unique structure that can be transformed into a shape that mimics nature.
  • 7. Tangible Elements tied to Product Development: o Hollow airy yarns o Natural fiber (e.g. cork materials) o Cashmere – purity o Twist of vegetable fibers (organic in designs) o Rustic, Geometric, Organic o Geometrics - digital printing and micro-patterning o Pleats, Ruffles and Memory Folds Countries Sourced From: TAIWAN Coneco Pleats, LINK CHINA Pan-Think Footwear Co Ltd. Weiliang Zeng, info-pan-think@163.com Shanghai Qianzheli Clothing Co Limited, Elyson Wong, LINK MEXICO Aztex Trading, Patricia Medina, LINK
  • 8. TREND // COMFORT
  • 9. // Consumer Analysis // Consumers are looking for the chance to reconnect with themselves. The concept of comfort is based around the design elements that allow consumers to escape reality and transform not only their state of mind, but their surrounds with ease. Calming colors and serene elements of „touch‟ (tactile perception) are key. The design components are kept humble and give the consumer mobility to create a living design based on comfort and wellbeing. There are even international comfort zone movements such as the “Silence Room” by Selfridges in London, England. When founder Harry Gordon Selfridge opened the store in 1909, it included a “Silence Room” where customer could find respite. “No Noise” by agency 18 Feet and Rising and “The Quiet Shop” by architect Alex Cochrane is a translation of this into other retail settings.
  • 10. There are also ties to the movement in people becoming more mindful in the world through conscious thinking and actions. Comfort Zones links the desire for luxurious leisurewear and the ability to nestle up to indulge in comfort of leisure time. It is said that the greatest luxury of all is time and that is something that most consumers are lacking. Intangible Elements tied to Emotional Purpose: o Nesting / Cocooning o Holistic / Purist o Innocence o Sanctuary o Quiet, Gentle, Tender o Taking time for oneself o Comfort with the ability to offer it “To Go” o Stress & Hassle Free / Undisturbed o Overall emphasis on comfort
  • 11. Tangible Elements tied to Product Development: o SMART fabrics that are engineered around wearability (comfort) o Soft washes, tactile (surface texture) o Ultra pluh feel / handle o Multi-layering o Handspun yarns o Rust dyes o Fluid movement o Performance fabrics (breathability)
  • 12. Materials: Felts + Exaggerated Chunky Knits created with oversized gauge needles Natural whites without using optical bleach Non-chemical processing, greige goods (raw materials in their natural state) Slow dying process to preserve softness Tencel that ideal for sensitive skin Countries Sourced For Concept PERU Perumoda, LINK MONGOLIA Buyan Cashmere LLC, LINK Uguuj Shim LLC, www.uguujshim.com MEXICO Aztex Trading, Patricia Medina
  • 13. TREND // CRAFTSMANSHIP
  • 14. //CONSUMER ANALYSIS// Consumers are focusing on heritage of traditional handcraftsmanship. They are becoming more conscious of the „story of behind the brand‟ and also participating in the brand's ethos with their own experiences and reflection (intrinsic motivations). Consumers feel the need to communicate their integrity of design appreciation through their valued purchases. Craftsmanship and its unique attributes contribute to this motivation of purchase as consumers love to discover new artisans sharing their innovation through their design skillsets. The Craftsmanship trend is based on exploring cultural elements of heritage with which consumers connect.
  • 15. Intangible Elements tied to Emotional Purpose: o Handcrafted o One-Of-A-Kind o Integrity of design o Products with a story behind it o The idea of not compromising quality o Technically stimulating o Conceptually and visually inviting o Communicate its long- term loyalty and commitment to rare and unique o Appreciation by influential personalities and designers
  • 16. Tangible Elements tied to Product Development: o Details on products appear custom o Each and every detail is a tribute to our roots in traditional o Products with a Heritage Story o Unique attributes o "BESPOKE" describes a high degree of CUSTOMISATION, and involvement of the end- user, in the production of the goods.
  • 17. NOTES: Countries Sourced for Concept INDONESIA Leginayba, Sarah Beekmans, sarahdewi@leginayba.com Baguda Wear, LINK COLUMBIA Articulos De Cuero, Alejandro Mesa, iventas@articur.com MEXICO Aztex Trading, Patricia Medina, LINK
  • 18. 5 Countries and Vendors To Note As part of our first report, we‟ve included companies and manufacturers that enable designers to produce quality products from our trends. As an extension, we also like to highlight five manufacturers who deliver superior quality products and processes that can help designers produce products consumers will want.
  • 19. MEXICO Aztex Trading, Vallejo, Mexico, www.aztex.net Aztex Trading manufactures with “authenticity” for a one-of-a-kind appeal. They are known for their hand-stitched appliques made from scraps of fabric left behind and hand knitted knitwear. Each piece is made by a group of ladies who are sourced in the small town of Queretero, Mexico. Most of these women are working to support their families and this may be their only source of income. Aztex strives to bring manufacturing back to the Western Hemisphere and their “authenticity” and one-of-a-kind detailing is the best way to compete with competitors in Asia. They also are a part of Mexmakers: Concept to Consumer “Mexmakers is a coordinated specialized supply chain. A cluster of companies that create, develop and manufacture different types of products in order to offer creativity, variety, availability and flexibility.” Creating a sense of community really sets them apart from the rest and offers a unique approach to manufacturing that truly “tells a story.” USA Vapor Apparel, Charleston, SC, www.vaporapparel.com Vapor Apparel is the manufacturer of high quality performance apparel engineered for mass customization with sublimation. Founded in 2004, Vapor Apparel is the industry leader in Sublimation Certified™ blank and decorated apparel. As part the company‟s mission to protect the environment and reduce our carbon footprint, they operate in 100% efficient LEED certified facilities and support local environmental sustainability initiatives. About Sublimation: Sublimation printing is a form of digital printing that works only with polyester fabric and is like a “tattoo on the garment.” The dyes are infused directly into the fibers when the right amount of heat is added which makes a virtually permanent full color, high-resolution print that will not crack, fade or peel EVER!
  • 20. CHINA Merry Trade Limited, NINGBO, China, www.leapfashion.com Merry Trade offers a unique approach to dyeing their textiles. The company‟s process allows for dye application while still enabling fabrics (shirts) a soft, chambray style. Their specialty materials are colorfast organic and non-organic cotton. They have multiple dye processes that can include enzyme wash, over-dye, and pigment dyeing. They are currently experimenting with a new process called Snow Wash Dyeing, a process of adding the chemicals to give the textile shape, structure, and form while washing the shirt as a plain shirt. The dye spreads and allows for the style to be different for each one. INDIA NC John & Sons Pvt Ltd, www.ncjohn.com Founded in 1943 as a family business, this manufacturer is known for their 100% natural, eco- friendly fabrics and vegetable dyes derived from plants, invertebrates, or minerals. Some of the colorants include iron rust, alizarin, turmeric, harda, alum, and indigo. This company is also known in the home industry as a leader in natural fiber good. N.C. John and Sons Pvt. Ltd. is one of the premier exporters of natural floor coverings from Kerala. PERU Perumoda, www.perumoda.com The company represents Peru as a whole. They promote direct contact between themselves and buyers nationwide. Peru‟s specialty is their cotton. Using two different types of cotton “Pima and Tanguis cotton” provides the fabric with the perfect essentials to make the garment more delightful for the consumer. What is a memorable Peruvian equality is that they use alpaca fur. Alpaca is considered to be “Gods‟ fiber”, which Peru contains “80% of the alpaca‟s word production”. The alpaca fur is highly seen in the fashion industry for its coziness, and its ability to contain dye.
  • 21. Report Editorial Credits Editorial: Macala Wright, WHY THIS WAY Layout: Carlo Soriano, @HandDrawnLife Illustration: Carlo Soriano & Macala Wright Forecasting & Analysis: Professor Wendy Bendoni, Forecaster Woodbury University, Fashion Marketing Department Jennifer Olmscheid, Textile Consultant Photography: David Rayside, Australia Maryfaith Soriano & Ben Barbin, San Diego, California For more information on the tradeshow, visit: http://www.magiconline.com/sourcing-at-magic

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