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IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)
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IP Management: Protecting Your Creative Ingenuity - Entrepreneurship 101 (2013/2014)

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Intellectual property (IP) is the lifeblood of every knowledge-based start-up or venture. In this lecture, learn how to identify and manage your intellectual property in a strategic way and examine …

Intellectual property (IP) is the lifeblood of every knowledge-based start-up or venture. In this lecture, learn how to identify and manage your intellectual property in a strategic way and examine how it fits in with your overall business model.

A large part of your competitive advantage depends on your ability to protect and properly exploit or commercialize your product or service innovations. IP law provides the framework for protecting and commercializing these innovations.We use some real-world examples, particularly in the IT/Web 2.0 space, where IP issues arise and discuss how to address them effectively.

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  • How many people in the audience have early-stage businesses?
    Something you see as strategically important … or an expense you just can’t afford?
    Use NDAs instead of getting protection?
    Story: Client called Mr. X
    Has a product – it is not on the market yet, and he tried to commercialize it with another guy, Mr. Y
    Let’s just assume the product is a baby bottle, and it is innovative because it prevents babies from spitting up – I have a 4-month-old right now and I have become something of an expert with bottle technology, and that would be a really useful innovation
  • Source: CIC Report – Rights & Rents
  • General
  • Patentability criteria
  • Patentable subject matter
  • Disclosure issues
  • Patent filing process
    PCT strategy stuff
  • Contrast vs. trade secret protection
  • Contrast vs. trade secret protection
  • General
  • General
  • Transcript

    • 1. IP  Management:     Protecting  Your  Creative  Ingenuity         November  20,  2013     Nathaniel  Lipkus,  Matthew  Powell  &  Ashlee  Froese  
    • 2. www.gilbertslaw.ca
    • 3. Overview     Sec$on  1  –  Overview  of  Intellectual  Property       Sec$on  2  –  Patents       Sec$on  3  –  Branding       Sec$on  4  –  Managing  Intellectual  Property    
    • 4. 1.  Overview  of  Intellectual  Property    
    • 5. What  is  Intellectual  Property?   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 6. The  Entrepreneur’s  Conundrum   vs.   Bootstrap   Invest  in  IP   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 7. Types  of  IP  Protection   Patent   Trade   Secret   Trademark   Your   Business   Design   Copyright   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 8. Canadian  IP:  By  the  Numbers   20   The  percentage  of  Canadian  science  or   technology  businesses  that  have  sought  IP   protection  of  any  kind   1.14   The  percentage  of  R&D  expenditures  by   Canadian  universities  that  are  captured  as   revenues  down  the  road  (compare  to  5%  for  the   United  States)   4.5   Billions  of  dollars  in  net  licensing  revenues  that   Canadian  entities  pay  to  foreign  entities  because   Canadians  are  buyers  not  sellers  of  IP   17   Canada’s  rank  out  of  24  developed  nations  on  an   OECD  innovation  scale  (despite  being  7th  in   R&D)   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 9. IP  =  Value  Capture   $12.5  Billion  ÷   17,000  Patents   $735K  per  Patent   $4.5  Billion  ÷   6,000  Patents   $750K  per  Patent   Brand  Value:   $77.8  million  (US)   Patents  afford  choices  at   a  dif[icult  time   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 10. 2.  Patents     www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 11. Patents   A  patent  is  used  to  defend  your  ability  to  be   unique  in  offering  a  feature,  service  or   other  advantage  resulting  from  invention.     Defend  by  forcing  competitor  to:   -­‐  Keep  advantage  out  of  their  offering;   -­‐  Provide  advantage  only  under  license;  or   -­‐  Develop  another  way  to  offer  advantage.   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 12. Eureka?     Invention  means:   -­‐   New,  useful,  non-­‐obvious  machine,   manufacture,  composition  of  matter,  art  or   process,  or  a  new  useful,  non-­‐obvious   improvement  in  one  of  these  things.     www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 13. The  Right  Stuff   Patentable   Not  Patentable   Computer  process  for  sharpening   A  camera  image  (See:  copyright).   blurry  camera  images.   Process  for  generating  nested   menus  for  display  on  a  smart   phone.   A  stylized  Rolex  logo  icon  on  a   smart  phone  app  (See:  trade   mark  or  industrial  design)   A  wide-­‐angle  video  camera  lens   for  [ilming  panoramic  scenes.   A  Clint  Eastwood  movie  with   panoramic  scenes  (See:   copyright)   Starbucks  coffee  cup  lid  with  drip   Attractive  Starbucks  mug  (see:   reduction  features.   industrial  design)   Sound  processing  software  for   professional  music  studios.   Professionally  produced  love   song  (See:  copyright)   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 14. Shhh  …   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 15. Patent  Preparation  and  Filing   1.  Understand  inventorship  and  ownership   •  Who  has  a  right  to  be  named  an  inventor?   •  Who  has  a  right  to  own  the  patent?     2.  Prepare  patent  application   •  Prepare  description,  drawings  and  claims.   3.  File  patent  application   •  Paperwork  +  patent  application  +  fees  in  each  country.   •  Use  fee-­‐deferral  techniques  when  patenting  in  more  than  one  country.   4.  Negotiate  With  Examiner(s)  (“Prosecution”)   •  Will  have  to  wait  awhile  to  hear  from  Examiners  (2-­‐3  years  sometimes).   •  Use  progress  with  one  Examiner  to  speed  up  examination  elsewhere.   5.  Receive  Granted  Patent   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 16. Should  I  Just  Keep  It  Secret?   Patent v. Trade Secret www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 17. Bootstrapping  Ideas   (Keeping Patenting Costs Under Control) www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 18. 3.  Branding     www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 19. Trade-­‐marks   Ultimately,  the  trade-­‐mark  represents  the   reputation,  quality  and  expertise  of  a   company.   Nike  Inc.   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 20. What  Could  Be  a  Trade-­‐mark?   Traditional  Trade-­‐marks   •  •  •  •  •  Single  word           Group  of  words         Group  of  numbers       Slogan                                         Design  (with  words)    SUBWAY                    BURGER  KING          967-­‐1111    DUDE  YOU’RE  GETTING  A  DELL   •  Design  (without  words)   Non-­‐Traditional  Trade-­‐marks   Three-­‐Dimensional   Colors     Distinguishing  Guise   Sound   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 21. The  Sword  and  the  Shield   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 22. The  Far  Reach  of  Non-­‐Traditional   Trade-­‐mark  Protection   Trade - mark: Owner: Registration No.: Category: Trade -mark: Owner: Application No.: Category: The Boeing Company 1,416,954 Category: Store front entrance Trade -mark: Owner: Company uniforms Colour configuration on plane Trade -mark: Owner: Application No.: Category: Build-A-Bear Retail Management, Inc. United Parcel Service of America, Inc. TMA528,999 Retail check out counter Abercrombie & Fitch Trading Co. 1,530,377 Category: Trade -mark: Owner: Sound Mark (Roaring lion sound) Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Lion Corp. www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 23. The  Good,  the  Bad  and   the  Forgettable   Suggestive Coined Generic Descriptive www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 24. How  to  Best  Protect  your  Brand   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Obtain  Trade-­‐mark  Registrations   Formalized  protection  of  business  asset   Increase  value  of  your  company   Registration  certi[icate  is  evidence  of  ownership   Exclusive  use   Rights  are  country-­‐wide   Renewable  registration  periods   Access  to  Federal  Court  judgments   Springboard  for  international  protection     Other  avenues  (domain  name  disputes,  social  media  etc.)   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 25. Registration  Process   Fact finding: client’s brand, use & searches Priority filing deadline Examiner’s Report: substantive v. formalities Use? Pleadings, evidence, argument, x-exam, hearings www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 26. The  Living  Brand   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Use  proper  marking  and  ownership  notices   Avoid  genericization   Use  trade-­‐mark  properly   Consistently  use  the  trade-­‐mark     Continue  to  use  trade-­‐mark  properly     License  properly   Police  vigilantly     Audit  the  wares/services   Renew,  renew,  renew   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 27. Ponder  this…   What  do:   escalator POST-IT ASPIRIN KLEENEX zipper plasticine BAND-AID have  in  common?   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 28. Let’s  Get  Social                       192  million  domain  names  registered   126  million  online  blogs   27.3  million  daily  tweets       350  million  people  on  Facebook         90  trillion  emails  sent  in  2009   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 29. The  Online  Assumption   Assumption   Brand  Inc.         BRAND.com   twitter/BRAND   Facebook/BRAND   Reality       .ca .eu .xxx   .net .uk www.gilbertslaw.ca   .us .jp   .info   .museum .mobi .co .me
    • 30. 4.  Managing  Intellectual  Property     www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 31. How  Not  to  Manage  IP   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 32. Good  Housekeeping   Know  Your  IP   •  Use  invention  disclosure  forms  to  capture  inventions  rather  than  rely  on   notebooks.   •  Use  spreadsheets  to  track  brands,  inventions,  patent  applications,  patents,   trademarks,  copyrights,  trade  secrets   Ensure  IP  Ownership   •  Ensure  IP  being  created  at  the  instruction  of  the  company  by  employees,   outside  contractors  etc.  is  owned  by  the  company   •  Establishing  formal,  written  agreements  early  reduces  costly  disputes  later   •  Maintain  a  repository  of  employment  agreements,  outside  contracts,   nondisclosure  agreements,  supply  agreements   Conduct  Periodic  IP  audits   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 33. IP  Hurdles  vs.  IP  Barriers   Survey  the  IP   Landscape   Avoid  barriers   Overcome  hurdles   Protect  your  own   IP  along  the  way   Who  owns    background  IP?   Act  early!   What  patents/designs   could  block  you?   Can  you  license?  Cross-­‐ license?  Partner?  Co-­‐exist?   What  businesses  are   branding  like  yours?   Can  you  invalidate   blocking  IP?   Any  big  players  to  plan  for?   Any  ways  to  insure?   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 34. Apple/Samsung   What’s  really  going  on?   Apple  and  Samsung  are  trying  to  take  a   bigger  %  pro[it  of  each  other’s  products   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 35. AIDS  in  Developing  Countries   IP   Gilead  had  developed  breakthrough  ARVs:  Viread,   Truvada  –  covered  by  patents  around  the  world   Problem   No  infrastructure  in  developing  world:  1,000-­‐paEent   penetraEon  (and  not  for  lack  of  trying)   Solu$on   15%  developing  country  license  to  Indian   manufacturers  /  discounts  to  wholesalers:  led  to   generic  penetraEon  of  2.9  million     1/3  of  HIV  pa$ents  treated  in  developing  world  take  a  Gilead   drug   www.gilbertslaw.ca  
    • 36. Thank  You    Nathaniel  Lipkus     Matt  Powell   Ashlee  Froese       www.gilbertslaw.ca     416.703.1100  

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