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Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Ralph Waldo Emerson

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  • 1. RALPH WALDO EMERSON<br />BIOGRAPHY <br />
  • 2. Waldo Emerson is truly the center of the American transcendental movement, setting out most of its ideas and values in a little book, Nature, published in 1836, that represented at least ten years of intense study in philosophy, religion, and literature, and in his First Series of essays. <br />
  • 3. Born in 1803 to a conservative Unitarian <br />minister, from a long line of ministers, and a <br />quietly devout mother, Waldo was a middle son <br />of whom relatively little was expected.<br />
  • 4. His father died when he was eight, the first of many premature deaths which would shape his life--all three brothers, his first wife at 20, and his older son at 5.<br />
  • 5. Perhaps the most powerful personal influence on him for years was his intellectual, eccentric, and death-obsessed Puritanical aunt, Mary Moody Emerson.<br />
  • 6. His undergraduate career at Harvard was not illustrious, and his studies at the Harvard Divinity School were truncated by vision problems, but he was ordained a minister of the Second Church in Boston, shortly before marrying Ellen Tucker in 1829.<br />
  • 7. In 1835 he married Lydia Jackson; they lived in Concord and had four children while he settled into his life of conversations, reading and writing, and lecturing, which furnished a comfortable income.<br />
  • 8. His Essays (first series) were published in 1841.<br />His five-year old son Waldo died in 1842<br />in 1844 he had a new volume of essays prepared<br />In 1845 he began extensive lecturing on &quot;the uses of great men,&quot; a series that culminated with the 1850 publication of Representative Men<br />
  • 9. Through a career of 40 years, he gave about 1500 public lectures, traveling as far as California and Canada but generally staying in Massachusetts<br />
  • 10. In 1847 Emerson travelled to England, when he returned to Concord nine months later, he had a new approach to English culture, which he expressed in his lectures on the &quot;Natural History of Intellect&quot; and his 1856 book, English Traits.<br />
  • 11. The Emersons called their Concord home “Bush” and the front parlor was frequently filled with friends and family<br />
  • 12. He had become quite famous, a major figure in the American literary landscape, a celebrity which brought both adultation and satire.<br />In 1857 he wrote an essay on &quot;Memory&quot; but ironically, in his later years, his own memory would falter, especially after his beloved house burned in 1872. He died quietly of pneumonia in 1882.<br />
  • 13. NATURE BY RALPH WALDO EMERSON<br />
  • 14. NATURE BY RALPH WALDO EMERSON<br />Our age is retrospective. It builds the sepulchres of the fathers. It writes biographies, histories, and criticism. The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. <br />
  • 15. NATURE BY RALPH WALDO EMERSON<br />Embosomed for a season in nature, whose floods of life stream around and through us, and invite us by the powers they supply, to action proportioned to nature<br /> The sun shines to-day also. There is more wool and flax in the fields. There are new lands, new men, new thoughts. Let us demand our own works and laws and worship.<br />
  • 16. Undoubtedly we have no questions to ask which are unanswerable. We must trust the perfection of the creation so far, as to believe that whatever curiosity the order of things has awakened in our minds, the order of things can satisfy.<br /> Every man&apos;s condition is a solution in hieroglyphic to those inquiries he would put. He acts it as life, before he apprehends it as truth. In like manner, nature is already, in its forms and tendencies, describing its own design.<br />
  • 17. All science has one aim, namely, to find a theory of nature. We have theories of races and of functions, but scarcely yet a remote approach to an idea of creation. We are now so far from the road to truth, that religious teachers dispute and hate each other, and speculative men are esteemed unsound and frivolous. But to a sound judgment, the most abstract truth is the most practical. Whenever a true theory appears, it will be its own evidence. Its test is, that it will explain all phenomena. Now many are thought not only unexplained but inexplicable; as language, sleep, madness, dreams, beasts, sex.<br />
  • 18. The universe is composed of Nature and the Soul. Strictly speaking, therefore, all that is separate from us, all which Philosophy distinguishes as the NOT ME, that is, both nature and art, all other men and my own body, must be ranked under this name, NATURE. <br />
  • 19. But to a sound judgment, the most abstract truth is the most practical. Whenever a true theory appears, it will be its own evidence. Its test is, that it will explain all phenomena. Now many are thought not only unexplained but inexplicable; as language, sleep, madness, dreams, beasts, sex.<br />
  • 20. QUESTIONS<br />When was Ralph Waldo Emerson born and where?<br />What was Ralph Waldo Emerson known for?<br />How did Ralph Waldo Emerson die?<br />When did Ralph Waldo Emerson die?<br />Did Ralph Waldo Emerson have any children?<br />What was Ralph Waldo Emerson famous for?<br />What is the meaning of the poem from Nature?<br />
  • 21. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION<br />

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