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Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009
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Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009

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Selected architectural projects.

Selected architectural projects.

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  • 1. Mark S. HeSSelgrave, arcHitect
  • 2. curriculuM vitae Education University of New Haven, Connecticut Master of Architecture Lafayette School Renovation Yale School of Architecture, 1985 Elizabeth, New Jersey Bachelor of Science / Architecture Projects with Flad & Associates (2000 – 2002) California Polytechnical State University, 1980 Senior Year Abroad, Florence, Italy, 1979-1980 Connecticut Innovations Corporate Headquarters Rocky Hill, Connecticut Registration Marshak Building Renovation and Addition Registered Architect, State of Connecticut, 1990 City University of New York, New York Eli Lilly Building 88 Professional Societies & Activities Indianapolis, Indiana LEED AP 2009 , Honorable Mention, Michigan Vietnam Veterans Memorial, 1996 Projects with Cesar Pelli & Associates (1985 – 2000) Drawing Prize, Yale University, 1985 Taussig Cancer Center Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Cleveland, Ohio Teaching Lerner Research Institute Adjunct Professor, State University of New York / Purchase 1986-1987 Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Cleveland, Ohio Principal Teaching Assistant, Descriptive Drawing, Yale, 1984-1985 SRB2 / Luck Building Teaching Assistant, Descriptive Drawing, Yale University, 1983-1984 University of California, Los Angeles Humanities and Social Sciences Building Publications University of California-Riverside Retrospecta Journal, Representative of Koeter Studio Mathematics and Science building Retrospecta Journal, Representative of Drawing A-54 Trinity College; Hartford, Connecticut Archetype Magazine, Outhouse Competition, Citation Center for Molecular Medicine Yale University; New Haven, Connecticut Projects with Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects (2004 – 2009) Ley Student Center Transbay Transit Center Rice University; Houston, Texas San Francisco, California Math Institute and Lecture Hall Cooperative Arts & Humanities High School Institute for Advanced Studies; Princeton, New Jersey New Haven, Connecticut City Center Convention Center Technology Las Vegas, Nevada Mark is versed in AutoCad, having established tool palettes and CAD Private Residence standards for several of his projects. He has some experience with 3D cad Livermore, California and Sketchup. Mark is also proficient in Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, and Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts Acrobat Pro, as well as MS Word, Excel, Project, and Powerpoint. He is also Miami, Florida handy with a No. 2 pencil. Projects with Fletcher Thompson, Inc. (2002 – 2004) Brien McMahon High School & Center for Global Studies Norwalk, Connecticut Student Union Expansion
  • 3. repreSentative Work
  • 4. tranSbay tranSit center, San FranciSco, ca Mark was Quality Manager for the Transbay Transit Center, a large feder- ally funded transportation project in San Francisco. The building will take up more than 5 acres over 4 city blocks in the heart of the city. As Quality Manager for the project, Mark worked independently from, and paral- lel with, the project team. Consultant assigned Quality Representatives that reported directly to him. In his role as QM, Mark was instrumental in creating the Plan, developing measurable procedures that were true to the plan and to the design firms’ culture, and enforcing the procedures with the project team on an ongoing basis. Transbay Transit Center; View at Street Level Transbay Transit Center; Aerial View
  • 5. tranSbay tranSit center, San FranciSco, ca Transbay Transit Center; Quality Assurance Procedure Transbay Transit Center; Quality Assurance Form
  • 6. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct Mark was the Design Team Leader for the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School in New Haven, Connecticut. In that role, he coordinated and produced bid documents for this complex building, while developing final details that enhanced the design intent. Through construction completion, Mark lead the design team to meet a tight budget and aggressive schedule. New Haven’s Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School is a state-of-the-art facility for performance and education in the midst of the city’s bustling arts and entertainment district. It includes a full-sized public theater, a “black box” experimen- tal theater, and exhibition spaces and all of the elements of a traditional high school, including a gymnasium, cafeteria, and classrooms. To maintain a lively street presence, the building has retail stores on the ground floor and direct public access to the theater lobby and galleries. The heart of the school is a 350-seat theater, complete with orchestra and balcony seating, an orchestra pit, scene shop, costume storage, dressing rooms, and loading dock. The theater features a sprung stage with a full fly loft, professional theater lighting, and a projection and control booth. In addition, the school includes rehearsal rooms, a ceramic studio, a photography Coop High School; View from Northeast darkroom, a graphic lab, a score library, a keyboard lab, a film and lecture hall, and creative writing rooms. Coop High School; View from Southeast Coop High School; West Elevation
  • 7. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct Coop High School; First Floor Plan
  • 8. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct
  • 9. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct
  • 10. city center convention center; laS vegaS, nevada Mark was responsible for developing the design of the main facade of this 300,000 square foot convention center. Conceived as folded glass planes, the design solution eventually settled on architecturally exposed structural steel bow trusses to support the facade. The design went through several iterations, from vertical to horizontal trusses, each coordinated with the structural team to determine the best solution. The geometry was carefully mapped to insure the constructibility and cost-effectiveness of the form. City Center Convention Center; Aerial View City Center Convention Center; Rendering of Interior City Center Convention Center; Plan City Center Convention Center; View across Pool Podium
  • 11. city center convention center; laS vegaS, nevada City Center Convention Center; Study of Truss Connection City Center Convention Center; Study of Truss Connection City Center Convention Center; Study of Vertical Truss Option
  • 12. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Mark was the Technical Designer for the Livermore residence. In that role, he coordinated and produced bid documents for the building, while developing final details that enhanced the design intent. As with any small project, the details do much to form the character of the place. The Livermore Residence is a private family home located south of Livermore, California, approximately 45 miles east of the San Francisco Bay Area. Built atop a 20-acre site amidst 15 acres of Chardonnay grape vineyards, the house is oriented to maximize the principal views to the north towards the greater Livermore Valley and Mount Diablo in the distance. The main residence comprises a master bedroom, two children’s bedrooms, a great room, a dining room, a sitting room, a library/media room, a sew- ing room and a 3-car garage. The dining room and great room straddle a large trellised terrace. A sculptural guest house, referred to as the “Folly”, is a 2-story stone-clad structure with a cantilevered guest room overlooking the vineyard. Beneath the Folly is a large outdoor dining area. The residence’s form is a simple rectangle in plan that has been eroded by a combination of courtyards and terraces on both the north and south sides of Livermore House; View from southeast the house. The materials for the house have been selected to harmonize with the site and its surroundings. The roofing material is copper-clad shingles that will quickly patinate to a rich dark brown and ultimately to a green. The simple roof form is defined by a single ridgeline and is only punctuated by a single, massive stone chimney. Mahogany trellises cover the courtyards and terraces. The exterior of the facade facing south features integrally-colored cement stucco with deep-set mahogany windows; the north is predomi- nantly a mahogany and glass window wall system. The principal architectural expression of the residence draws from the home’s structural system of finely crafted millwork. The structure consists of exposed glue-laminated rafters, topped with wooden decking, and glue-laminated beams and columns. All structural millwork will be fabricated from Douglas Fir and be exposed throughout. The interiors are intended to be crisp and modern in design. Interior elements and finishes, while remaining comple- mentary to the larger wooden volume, will exist within and float free of the wooden jewelbox. Livermore House; Plan
  • 13. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Livermore House; View from northeast
  • 14. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Folly; Photo of South Facade Folly; Structural Axonometric Sketch
  • 15. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Livermore House; Interior Photo at Entry
  • 16. adrienne arSHt center For tHe perForMing artS, MiaMi, Florida Mark was Technical Architect on many critical components of this complex project. The 500,000 sf Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts (formerly the Carnival Center) is the premier performing arts center in South Florida and the second largest in the United States, after Lincoln Center. The Arsht Center con- sists of two main buildings – the Sanford and Delores Ziff Ballet Opera House and the John S. and James L. Knight Concert Hall – separated by the outdoor Plaza of the Arts. The Arsht Center is home to the Miami Ballet and the Florida Grand Opera and host to guest resident orchestras and traveling productions. The Ballet Opera House and the Concert Hall are each composed of a series of stepped masses clad in light-colored Sardinian granite. The forms, a modern interpretation of ancient stone ar- chitecture, project a sense of both permanence and excitement. The buildings are punctuated by large glass and steel curtain walls at their entries, adding to their contemporary, crystalline expression. The Plaza for the Arts, which is bisected by Biscayne Boulevard, contains colonnades, cascading garden terraces, and a paving Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts pattern based on Afro-Caribbean designs. A 1929 tower from a Sears store, the earliest example of Art Deco style in Miami, was preserved and incorporated into the Plaza design. In addition to its 2,480-seat main stage, the Ballet Opera House includes a 200-seat studio theater for smaller productions. In the main house, a dramatic “acoustic dome” hangs over the audience – a 40-foot convex disc covered with sound-reflective bumps that bounce sound throughout the space. In the 2,200-seat Concert Hall, a spiraling acoustic canopy is suspended over the stage. Rings of custom light fixtures accent the flowing form. In conjunction with the Miami-Dade Art in Public Places program, Pelli Clarke Pelli collaborated with five artists to create unique works that were incorporated into the architecture: Jose Bedia, Robert Rahway Zakananitch, Gary Moore, Anna Valentina Murch, and Cundo Bermudez. Site Plan
  • 17. adrienne arSHt center For tHe perForMing artS, MiaMi, Florida Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Aerial Photo
  • 18. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Mark was Senior Design Leader for this 320,000 square foot public high school. His responsibilities included primary contact with the Building Committee and all user groups to determine program requirements, room layouts, and classroom utilization calcula- tions. Mark generated the design options from conceptual design through design development, and presented the options as they were developed to the building committee. He coordinated the work of the design team in the office, and worked with the en- gineers to resolve placement of major equipment and primary distribution paths. The project began with program verification and a feasibility study to determine the most effective approach to the design. The work evolved into the full renovation of the existing school - 200,000 sf - and an addition of 120,000 sf. The renovation included a 900 seat auditorium, new entry lobbies, classrooms, and ad- ministration. An existing courtyard was enclosed to create a new double height media center. The addition holds new science labs, Existing Building; Second Floor cafeteria, and a magnet school, the Center for Global Studies. The constrained site, complex existing conditions, and multiple client groups made the success of this project particularly rewarding. Existing Building; Entry Existing Building; First Floor
  • 19. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Schematic Design Option D; Site and First Floor Plan Schematic Design Option D; Aerial Perspective Schematic Design Option C; Aerial Perspective Schematic Design Option B; Site and First Floor Plan
  • 20. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  • 21. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  • 22. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  • 23. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  • 24. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Section at Media Center; Design Sketch Section at Media Center; Construction Document
  • 25. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Plan Study at CGS Community Room Elevation Study at CGS Community Room
  • 26. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut Senior Design Leader for this 18,000 square foot student center housing offices for a variety of on-campus clubs. The building is an addition to an existing student union, in a prominent location on campus, and includes office space for club organizations and a large assembly space. The massing and materials of the design mediates between the modernist expression of the existing stu- dent union and the traditional Georgian campus architecture. University of New Haven; Lower Level Plan University of New Haven; First Floor Plan
  • 27. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut elevation - SoutH
  • 28. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut
  • 29. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut
  • 30. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Mark acted as Project Manager and Senior Designer for this 620,000 gross square foot academic science and research build- ing. The programming phase was recently completed under his direction. The feasibility study that was part of that phase concluded that the existing structure requires total renovation, including replacement of all MEP systems, reinforcement of the structure, and re-cladding of the facade. A new research wing of approximately 280,000 gross square feet will be added and con- nected to the existing building with an atrium. The gross area of the addition and the renovation combined totals 900,000 square feet, with an estimated budget of five hundred million dollars. The Marshak Tower is the major science and technology center for the City University system and houses offices, support spac- es, lecture halls, seminar and conference rooms, break areas, library, computer center, and the school’s athletic facilities in addition to the key research functions. The proposed building will be a state-of-the-art research facility incorporating some of the latest advances in technology and energy management systems. The project was put on hold late in 2001. City University of New York; Science Building Site Options Marshak Building; Photograph of Existing Facade
  • 31. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Marshak Building; First Floor Plan
  • 32. Marshak Building; Typical Science Laboratory Floor - Addition
  • 33. Marshak Building; Typical Science Laboratory Floor - Addition
  • 34. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Marshak Building; Typical Science Laboratory Floor - Addition
  • 35. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Marshak Building; Section through Existing Building and Addition
  • 36. Srb2/luck reSearcH building; ucla Mark was the Design Team Leader for this 225,000 square foot research building. He was responsible for all aspects of design during the site analysis, conceptual design, and schematic de- sign phases. Critical to the success of the design was maximizing efficiency, which was done through utilizing linear equipment rooms as circulation spaces. The facility houses generic wet labs, a vivarium, faculty offices, and administration offices. The UCLA Biomedical Sciences Research Building and Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center form a new center for research on the UCLA campus. The combined buildings house the Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, the UCLA AIDS Institute and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research Institute. Together, the two buildings house more than 450 scientists and staff, with 12 to 14 groups of scientists sharing four labs on each floor. The buildings are designed to encourage collaboration between researchers who may not ordinarily work together. Open laborato- ries are shared among departments and an open circular staircase connects the two buildings, allowing access across floors. The four Luck Building; View from Court of the Sciences above-grade floors of each building house laboratories, laboratory support, conference rooms and investigators’ offices. The vivarium and mechanical services are below grade. The buildings occupy a prominent site between the historic north campus, with the Court of Sciences to the west and the Sciences Center to the southwest. They face the Mathias Botani- cal Garden to the south and an important campus entrance from Hilgard Avenue to the east. The design reinforces the connection between the Medical Center to the south and the remainder of the campus to the north. An inviting pedestrian walkway forges a strong east-west link from the Hilgard campus entrance to the Court of Sciences. SRB/Luck Research Building; Site Plan
  • 37. Srb2/luck reSearcH building; ucla Luck Building; View from Court of the Sciences
  • 38. Srb2/luck reSearcH building; ucla 6.7° ° R3 6.7 R2 ° 6.7 ° R1.3 6.7 R1 ° 22'-2" 6.7 ° 7'-9 1/2 6.7 " 53'-11" 6.7° 11'- 2" ° 8'-0 1/2 18 17.5 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 6.7° 6.7 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 " 10'-4" 10'-4" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 32'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" A FD FD FD FD A 8'-0 1/2" Q. BREAK AHR AHR AHR AHR AHR AHR AHR AHR A.4 A.4 11'-11 1/2" 27'-0" Q. FD FD BREAK LOCKER " 1/2 FD FD AHR MEP ROOM '-0 A.8 LB-U01 AHR FD AHR FD A.8 AHR 16 R1 O. R. 7'-0" CARCASS AHR TO 97 F.O '- 0 PROC. RM. PROC. RM. . MAS " PROC. RM. ON B LOCKER RY B FD FD Q SURGICAL SCRUB ANIMAL 2" OFFICE NECROPSY PREP. PREP. PROC. RM. ANTE PROC. / AHR ANTE PROC. / AHR PROC. RM. AHR 1/ 22'-2" 22'-2" RM. RM. '-2 23 R-5 C C PROC JAN. LUCK SRB2 TOILET 11'-2" W. UP ELEVATOR ELEVATOR FEED PROC LOBBY P SEL-001 " SB-A01 '- 7 21'-5" STERILE 21 R5 DATA/ CLEAN ELEC. ELEVATOR 10'-3" ELEVATOR SEL-002 LB-U00 AHR SEL-003 AHR D D 2" 1/ SOILED -7 PROC 1' AHR O QUARANTINE " 10 UP '- 29'-9" 23 29'-9" PROC AHR AHR MEP ROOM LB-U02 ANIM. ANIM. RECEIVG. PROCESS. " /2 N PROC R3 AHR 1 E 1 AHR '- 4 2 R 2 O. M TO 0 5 ASO AHR F. PROC '- 0 NRY 22'-2" 22'-2" 1 /2 OFFICE PROC " AHR " /2 M 1 AHR 1 '- GOWN 4 PROC 2 F AHR F AHR 7'-0" AHR LOCKER F.2 2" F.2 1/ LOCKER -1 L ' MACHINE 24 AHR 27'-0" ROOM LB-U03 AHR 20'-0" H LOCKER 2" AHR 1/ '-1 24 AREAWAY K LB-U04 TOILET TOILET G G " 1/2 -1 I 24' J 1/2" 24'-1 24'-1 1/2" I 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 11'-4" 9'-4" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 32'-8" J H 16 15 R5 R4 13 12 11 10 9 18 17 14 K L SK-117 BASEMENT PLAN UCLA The Orthopaedic Hospital- J. Vernon Luck,Sr., M.D. Center and Health Sciences-Seismic Replacement Building 2 0 4 8 16 05 January 2001 Cesar Pelli & Associates, Inc Architects, GPR Planners Collaborative, Inc Copyright 2001 SRB2/Luck Research Building; Basement Vivarium Level
  • 39. Srb2/luck reSearcH building; ucla C.P. #1 R3 5° R2 6.7 E= R1.3 UL R1 M OD 22'-2" E A. 7'-9 1/2 " 53'-11" 11'- 2" 8'-0 1/2 18 17.5 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 " 10'-4" 10'-4" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 32'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" A A 8'-0 1/2" LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB L3-L01 L3-L02 L3-L03 L3-L04 L3-L05 L3-L06 L3-L07 L4-L08 L3-L09 L3-L10 S3-L01 S3-L02 S3-L03 S3-L04 S3-L05 S3-L06 S3-L07 S3-L08 S3-L09 S3-L10 S3-L11 S3-L12 S3-L13 S3-L14 A.4 A.4 11'-11 1/2" OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE S3-O00 S3-O00 S3-O00 27'-0" L2-O00 " 1/2 ADMINISTRATION/ OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE DRY LAB L2-O00 L2-O00 S3-O00 S3-O00 S3-O00 L2-A00 '-0 OFFICE A.8 L2-O00 A.8 16 7'-0" CORRIDOR CORRIDOR R1 S3-C04 S3-C00 TO 9 7 '- F.O 0 . MU " B LLIO B ADMINISTRATION/ LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB N WEST STAIR DRY LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT LVS-20B L2-A00 SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT EAST STAIR MECH. LST-001 L3-S06 S3-S01 S3-S02 S3-S03 S3-S04 S3-S05 S3-S06 S3-S07 S3-S08 S3-S09 S3-S10 L3-S01 L3-S02 L3-S03 L3-S04 L3-S05 L3-S07 SST-001 BREAK Q ROOM BREAK ROOM S3-A00 2" ADMINISTRATION LVS-20A L3-A00 MECH. WOMENS S3-A00 SVS-25 1/ MENS 22'-2" 22'-2" MECH. SVS-22 LVS-26 CONFERENCE S3-T00 MECH. MECH. ROOM S3-T00 '-2 L3-O00 23 CORRIDOR LINEAR EQUIPMENT ROOM LINEAR EQUIPMENT ROOM LINEAR EQUIPMENT ROOM CORRIDOR S3-C02 S3-Q01 L3-Q01 S3-Q03 S3-C13 LOBBY L3-A01 R-5 C OFFICE C S3-O00 19'-1 1 L3-U00 /2" 11'-2" ELEC. ELEVATOR S4-U00 ELEVATOR ELEC. ELEVATOR LOBBY MECH. LEL-004 SEL-001 SVS-14 P 19 S3-C03 ELEVATOR BREAK RM. '-1 LOBBY " 1/2 S4-P05 CORRIDOR '- 7 21'-5" S3-A01 S2-C10 " MECH. 21 R5 SVS-11B CORRIDOR CORRIDOR L3-C01 S4-C08 BREAK ROOM ELEVATOR DATA ROOM DATA ROOM 10'-3" 19 L3-A00 L3-U00 ELEVATOR SEL-002 S3-U04 MECH. '- SEL-003 MECH. 1 S 3 OM NG SVS-21 MECH. SVS-11A RO TI 1/ MEE MECH. 04 2" SVS-09 -A LVS-01A D D 2" CORRIDOR CORRIDOR CORRIDOR ON 1/ CORRIDOR ATI S3-C09 S3-C11 L3-C03 S3-C01 ISTR 00 -7 MIN 3 -O AD S 1' 19 O '- " LAV LVS-02A MECH. MECH. /2 1 JANITOR MECH. MECH. -O E ELECT. S3-T03 S 3 FFIC SVS-10 00 LAV. SVS-12B 1 1/ S3-U02 SVS-12C O L3-R00 MECH. SPILL REPSONSE S3-U01 1 EQUIP. ROOM 2" LVS-06 29'-9" 29'-9" '- CORRIDOR S4-C07 L4-U00 " 4 LAB ORT '- 4 2 CORRIDOR PP L4-C02 SU S 18 73 MECH. MECH. LVS-02C S 3- ICE 0 R LVS-02B OFF -O 0 S3 LAB ORT PP SU -S 17 19 CENTER STAIR S3 S4-U00 S4-U00 '-1 DATA SST-002 DATA IDOR FIRE CORR -H 02 " 1/2 S4 B S3-U03 ROOM LA 26 /2 N ENT -L EQUIPM LABORT S3 1 R3 LINEAR E " S3- Q02 1 SUPP 16 S3 -S '- CORRIDOR 4 LINEAR EQUIPMENT ROOM CORRIDOR 2 R 2 O. M L4-C05 L4-Q02 S3-C05 LAB T LAB 5 TO OR SUPP 15 L2 0 5 ASO S3 -S S 3- F. LAB RT '- 0 NRY SVS-24 SUPPO 4 MECH. 22'-2" 22'-2" S3 -S1 19'-1 1 1 /2 LAB MENS WOMENS LAB T LAB 4 LVS-00 LVS-23 OFFICE SUPPOR MECH. MECH. S3-T00 S3-T00 L2 S 3- " L4-O00 LAB T S3- S13 SUPPOR LAB S3-S 12 2" SUPPORT 1/ M /2" LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB SUPPORT S3-S1 1 -L 23 1 SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT SUPPORT S3-S10 S3 '- L3-S08 L3-S09 L3-S10 L3-S11 24 C.P. #2 F LAB F -L 22 S3 CORRIDOR 7'-0" S3-C06 LAB 1 S3 -L2 F.2 2" F.2 LAB 1/ '-1 OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE 0 L S3 -L2 24 S3-O00 S3-O00 S3-O00 27'-0" LAB S3- L19 LAB 20'-0" H LAB S3-L 18 LAB S3-L 17 LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB LAB 2" L3-L11 L3-L12 L3-L13 L3-L14 L3-L15 L3-L16 S3-L15 S3-L16 1/ '-1 24 K G G " 1/2 -1 I 24' J 1/2" 24'-1 24'-1 1/2" I 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 11'-4" 9'-4" 20'-8" 20'-8" 20'-8" 32'-8" J H 16 15 R5 R4 13 12 11 10 9 18 17 14 K L SK-120 THIRD FLOOR PLAN UCLA The Orthopaedic Hospital- J. Vernon Luck,Sr., M.D. Center and Health Sciences-Seismic Replacement Building 2 0 4 8 16 05 January 2001 Cesar Pelli & Associates, Inc Architects, GPR Planners Collaborative, Inc Copyright 2001 SRB2/Luck Research Building; Typical Research Floor Plan
  • 40. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Mark was Design Team Leader responsible for all aspects of the project’s design and management from conception through construction. He played a key role in developing a design that was both highly functional for the staff and welcoming for the patients and their families. The 168,000 square foot Taussig Cancer Center provides outpa- tient facilities for cancer patients at the Cleveland Clinic. Linked to the existing Cancer Center by a pedestrian bridge, the new building provides 44 treatment rooms and 56 exam rooms. Support facilities include a bone marrow transplant suite, labs for blood and x-ray diagnostics, and a linear accelerator suite. Patient Support Services include a library, vending cafeteria and family consulting. Doctors have offices on the third floor. A large lecture hall, also on the third floor, was designed for ac- commodating the staff’s daily grand round meetings, as well as providing sophisticated audio/visual equipment for telemedicine and continuing medical education. The building exterior is a continuation of the palette established by Cesar Pelli’s Crile Building, the primary outpatient facility at the Clinic. Both buildings are clad with a pale red granite, and their scale is modulated by subtle horizontal accents. However, where the Crile Building uses two species of granite to create its accents, the Cancer Center wraps the building with a silver metal reveal. The reveal is continuous, running between stones and through the window frame extrusion. The design of this sophisticated curtain wall was an aesthetic and technological achievement. The combination of warm granite and stainless steel relays to the patients and their families that this is a state of the art facility. The interior is designed with the intent of providing a comforting setting for the patients. In public areas, the walls are paneled with a light wood, paint colors are subtle but vibrant, and a slatted Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Context Plan wood ceiling with acoustical treatment provides a quiet envi- ronment. The clinical areas use practical and durable materials, with paint colors and natural light to soften them. The rooms are organized clearly and simply to facilitate both way-finding and the clinical operations.
  • 41. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Taussig Cancer Center; Rendering
  • 42. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Taussig Cancer Center; First Floor Plan
  • 43. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Taussig Cancer Center; Second Floor Plan
  • 44. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Taussig Cancer Center; Third Floor Plan
  • 45. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Taussig Cancer Center; Fourth Floor Plan
  • 46. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Taussig Cancer Center; First Floor Entry and Information Desk Taussig Cancer Center; First Floor Waiting Area Taussig Cancer Center; View Towards Bridge to Existing Cancer Center Taussig Cancer Center; Exam Floor Reception Desk and Waiting Area
  • 47. tauSSig cancer center, cleveland clinic Foundation Taussig Cancer Center; Interior Rendering
  • 48. lerner reSearcH inStitute, cleveland clinic Foundation Mark was Project Manager responsible for all aspects of the project, including oversite of technical details, construction docu- ments, and primary client contact and contractual negotiations. The 420,000 square foot Lerner Research Institute houses the continuing education and basic research programs for the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Ohio. Similar to the Mayo Clinic, the Cleveland Clinic is an internationally recognized hospital, supported by full research and education facilities. The Lerner Research Institute was a significant project for the Clinic. It was the second in a series of buildings designed by Cesar Pelli that would come to establish an architectural identity for the campus. Mark was the project manager for this job, maintaining primary client contact and team direction through the design documen- tation and construction phases. The Institute is composed of three wings that shelter a courtyard; a pedestrian bridge completes the quadrangle. Like a traditional campus, the courtyard is a gathering place, a focal point for the facility. The building’s West wing contains a 45,000 square foot medical Lerner Research Institute; View from Street library, classrooms, seminar rooms, and offices for the Cleveland Clinic Medical Education program. A building-wide network of video and data lines support the Clinic’s Distance Learning and Telemedicine programs. Finishes are commensurate with the Clinic’s status as a world class facility, with wood paneled walls and ceilings in the public areas of the building. The South and East wings contain 280,000 square feet of research laboratories, and are occupied by the Clinic’s basic research pro- grams, including Molecular Biology, Cancer Biology, Neuroscience and Immunology. Lerner Research Institute; Detailed View of Curtainwall
  • 49. lerner reSearcH inStitute, cleveland clinic Foundation Lerner Research Institute; Classroom Corridor Lerner Research Institute; Commons Dining Room Lerner Research Institute; Lecture Hall
  • 50. lerner reSearcH inStitute, cleveland clinic Foundation Lerner Research Institute; First Floor Plan
  • 51. lerner reSearcH inStitute, cleveland clinic Foundation Lerner Research Institute; Fifth Floor Plan
  • 52. HuManitieS and Social ScienceS building, univerSity oF caliFornia, riverSide Mark was the Project Manager for this 115,000 square foot building for University of California, Riverside, involved in both the design and management of the project. The building provides a new home for the departments of Humanities and Social Sciences. Seven academic departments, including History, English, and Romance Languages, were brought together in a single complex, sharing resources such as classrooms and seminar rooms. The early stages of design coordinated the requirements of these user groups, and built consensus among them. In subsequent design phases, specific departmental criteria was ad- dressed. Each department required their own reception area, and clarity of circulation and way-finding was an important design parameter. Also, the upper floors of the building would primarily house offices, with each office requiring a window. These requirements, along with the context shaped the building. The U.C. Riverside campus has a strong existing architectural style, with an equally strong group of project managers to see that new buildings relate to the old. Buildings on campus are typically long structures oriented East to West. Given the environment of this campus on the edge of the Southern California desert, buildings are detailed to prevent excessive solar gain to the interior. Many of the campus buildings incorporate deep roof overhangs and external sunscreens for the windows, and courtyards surrounded by two or three story buildings provide a shady respite. As the design for the Humanities and Social Sciences building brought these factors together, a solution emerged – a courtyard building with colonnades. Departments are entered from along the colonnade, easing way-finding. Public rooms, such as classrooms and seminar rooms, are also entered from the colonnades. Rooms requiring large column free space are located on the ground floor, while the narrow plan of the upper floors provides a window to each 125 square foot office. Exterior materials lighten as they rise vertically, from brick to stucco to metal panels. Aluminum sunscreens shade the windows on the South side, as does the deep roof overhang. UC Riverside; Schematic Design Rendering
  • 53. HuManitieS and Social ScienceS building, univerSity oF caliFornia, riverSide UC Riverside; First Floor Plan
  • 54. HuManitieS and Social ScienceS building, univerSity oF caliFornia, riverSide UC Riverside; View of South Facade and Tower
  • 55. HuManitieS and Social ScienceS building, univerSity oF caliFornia, riverSide UC Riverside; View of North Facade and Stairs UC Riverside; View into Courtyard
  • 56. inStitute For advanced Study, princeton, neW JerSey Mark was Project Architect for this 30,000 square foot Mathemat- ics building, helping develop the design while leading the team during documentation and construction phases. The building is part of a private campus devoted to pure research. Originally headed by Albert Einstein, the Institute for Advanced Studies continues to provide fellowships for today’s thinkers to continue their theoretical research. The client’s primary functional require- ment was to provide an environment conducive to that pursuit. The campus contains a range of architectural styles, from Geor- gian to Modern. The Mathematics building creates a courtyard with the Georgian Administration building, and so takes many of its architectural cues from it. The main materials are brick, limestone, and operable wood windows. Institute for Advanced Study; First Floor Plan The building itself is composed of two parts. The primary part is a block of offices with supporting functions. Each Fellow is pro- vided with a large office, carefully detailed to provide acoustical isolation from its neighbor. The building also contains a Common Room, where the Fellows gather daily for afternoon tea and to share ideas. Carefull use of wood and slate in public areas gives the interior a sense of richness without high cost. The smaller but more sculptural part of the complex is a recital hall. The recital hall provides a venue for lectures as well as musi- cal performances. This hall will be used for public events, and so received a higher budget for interior finishes. Acoustical proper- ties were also a primary design consideration. To “tune” the hall the design team used a combination of absorbative and reflective wall panels, curved to catch or reflect the sound. A fabric covered the curved panels, so that the acoustic treatment did not affect the room’s symmetry. Wood is used as an accent material on the side walls of the hall, with the stage and proscenium finished all in wood. We’ve been told by the client that the hall’s acoustical performance is superb. Institute for Advanced Study; Auditorium
  • 57. inStitute For advanced Study, princeton, neW JerSey Institute for Advanced Study; Exterior View of Auditorium and Common Room
  • 58. MatHeMaticS and Science building; trinity college, connecticut Mark was Project Architect for this 45,000 square foot Mathemat- ics and Science building in charge of producing construction documents as well as shepharding the project through construc- tion. The project provides a new classroom and faculty office building for Trinity College. The building stretches out to create a fourth wall for one of the Campus Greens. A rich exterior pallette of brick and sandstone relates the building to early 19th century buildings on the campus. Mahogany window frames offer very good thermal performance, and the wood brings another level of richness to the interior spaces. The program functions are divided by the central corridor. Class- rooms are on the South side of the building, faculty offices on the North. The ends of the building are expressed as towers; mechanical rooms are housed in the top floor. The towers also contain the building’s public spaces. These include large open stairways that serve as conversation areas as well as exit stairs. Across from the stairs at each floor are student lounges. The Institute for Advanced Study; First Floor Plan design of the lounges carries the mahogany of the windows into interior finishes, creating a comfortable club-like atmosphere. Institute for Advanced Study; Auditorium
  • 59. MatHeMaticS and Science building; trinity college, connecticut
  • 60. MicHigan vietnaM veteranS MeMorial; lanSing, MicHigan Mark’s design for the Michigan Vietnam Vet- eran’s memorial was awarded an Honorable mention from a field of 200 entries. The me- morial contains a reproduction of one soldier’s last letter home before he was killed in action. A pool holds a meditation platform at one end, and a bronze statue of a soldier in a poncho at the other. Water from the pool cascades down beside the memorial, echoing the sounds of the jungle, carrying memories of life and death. aerial vieW oF Model
  • 61. MicHigan vietnaM veteranS MeMorial; lanSing, MicHigan perSpective
  • 62. Holocaust MeMorial, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania The memorial is located in a park by the side of the Susquehanna River. On the river side of the memorial, the ground is dished slightly, and contains stone slabs that recall the fallen victims of the Holocaust. A bronze casting stands above the slabs; the side facing the street contains facts describing the event, while the side facing the river is a relief depicting living victims. Beside a pool that runs to the river is the inscription “Who will give us water to wash the dead?”. plan vieW
  • 63. HolocauSt MeMorial, HarriSburg, pennSylvania perSpective vieW FroM river
  • 64. Mark S. HeSSelgrave, arcHitect

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