Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009

901 views

Published on

Selected architectural projects.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
901
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
12
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hesselgrave Portfolio - 2009

  1. 1. Mark S. HeSSelgrave, arcHitect
  2. 2. curriculuM vitae Education University of New Haven, Connecticut Master of Architecture Lafayette School Renovation Yale School of Architecture, 1985 Elizabeth, New Jersey Bachelor of Science / Architecture Projects with Flad & Associates (2000 – 2002) California Polytechnical State University, 1980 Senior Year Abroad, Florence, Italy, 1979-1980 Connecticut Innovations Corporate Headquarters Rocky Hill, Connecticut Registration Marshak Building Renovation and Addition Registered Architect, State of Connecticut, 1990 City University of New York, New York Eli Lilly Building 88 Professional Societies & Activities Indianapolis, Indiana LEED AP 2009 , Honorable Mention, Michigan Vietnam Veterans Memorial, 1996 Projects with Cesar Pelli & Associates (1985 – 2000) Drawing Prize, Yale University, 1985 Taussig Cancer Center Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Cleveland, Ohio Teaching Lerner Research Institute Adjunct Professor, State University of New York / Purchase 1986-1987 Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Cleveland, Ohio Principal Teaching Assistant, Descriptive Drawing, Yale, 1984-1985 SRB2 / Luck Building Teaching Assistant, Descriptive Drawing, Yale University, 1983-1984 University of California, Los Angeles Humanities and Social Sciences Building Publications University of California-Riverside Retrospecta Journal, Representative of Koeter Studio Mathematics and Science building Retrospecta Journal, Representative of Drawing A-54 Trinity College; Hartford, Connecticut Archetype Magazine, Outhouse Competition, Citation Center for Molecular Medicine Yale University; New Haven, Connecticut Projects with Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects (2004 – 2009) Ley Student Center Transbay Transit Center Rice University; Houston, Texas San Francisco, California Math Institute and Lecture Hall Cooperative Arts & Humanities High School Institute for Advanced Studies; Princeton, New Jersey New Haven, Connecticut City Center Convention Center Technology Las Vegas, Nevada Mark is versed in AutoCad, having established tool palettes and CAD Private Residence standards for several of his projects. He has some experience with 3D cad Livermore, California and Sketchup. Mark is also proficient in Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, and Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts Acrobat Pro, as well as MS Word, Excel, Project, and Powerpoint. He is also Miami, Florida handy with a No. 2 pencil. Projects with Fletcher Thompson, Inc. (2002 – 2004) Brien McMahon High School & Center for Global Studies Norwalk, Connecticut Student Union Expansion
  3. 3. repreSentative Work
  4. 4. tranSbay tranSit center, San FranciSco, ca Mark was Quality Manager for the Transbay Transit Center, a large feder- ally funded transportation project in San Francisco. The building will take up more than 5 acres over 4 city blocks in the heart of the city. As Quality Manager for the project, Mark worked independently from, and paral- lel with, the project team. Consultant assigned Quality Representatives that reported directly to him. In his role as QM, Mark was instrumental in creating the Plan, developing measurable procedures that were true to the plan and to the design firms’ culture, and enforcing the procedures with the project team on an ongoing basis. Transbay Transit Center; View at Street Level Transbay Transit Center; Aerial View
  5. 5. tranSbay tranSit center, San FranciSco, ca Transbay Transit Center; Quality Assurance Procedure Transbay Transit Center; Quality Assurance Form
  6. 6. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct Mark was the Design Team Leader for the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School in New Haven, Connecticut. In that role, he coordinated and produced bid documents for this complex building, while developing final details that enhanced the design intent. Through construction completion, Mark lead the design team to meet a tight budget and aggressive schedule. New Haven’s Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School is a state-of-the-art facility for performance and education in the midst of the city’s bustling arts and entertainment district. It includes a full-sized public theater, a “black box” experimen- tal theater, and exhibition spaces and all of the elements of a traditional high school, including a gymnasium, cafeteria, and classrooms. To maintain a lively street presence, the building has retail stores on the ground floor and direct public access to the theater lobby and galleries. The heart of the school is a 350-seat theater, complete with orchestra and balcony seating, an orchestra pit, scene shop, costume storage, dressing rooms, and loading dock. The theater features a sprung stage with a full fly loft, professional theater lighting, and a projection and control booth. In addition, the school includes rehearsal rooms, a ceramic studio, a photography Coop High School; View from Northeast darkroom, a graphic lab, a score library, a keyboard lab, a film and lecture hall, and creative writing rooms. Coop High School; View from Southeast Coop High School; West Elevation
  7. 7. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct Coop High School; First Floor Plan
  8. 8. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct
  9. 9. cooperative artS & HuManitieS HigH ScHool, neW Haven, ct
  10. 10. city center convention center; laS vegaS, nevada Mark was responsible for developing the design of the main facade of this 300,000 square foot convention center. Conceived as folded glass planes, the design solution eventually settled on architecturally exposed structural steel bow trusses to support the facade. The design went through several iterations, from vertical to horizontal trusses, each coordinated with the structural team to determine the best solution. The geometry was carefully mapped to insure the constructibility and cost-effectiveness of the form. City Center Convention Center; Aerial View City Center Convention Center; Rendering of Interior City Center Convention Center; Plan City Center Convention Center; View across Pool Podium
  11. 11. city center convention center; laS vegaS, nevada City Center Convention Center; Study of Truss Connection City Center Convention Center; Study of Truss Connection City Center Convention Center; Study of Vertical Truss Option
  12. 12. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Mark was the Technical Designer for the Livermore residence. In that role, he coordinated and produced bid documents for the building, while developing final details that enhanced the design intent. As with any small project, the details do much to form the character of the place. The Livermore Residence is a private family home located south of Livermore, California, approximately 45 miles east of the San Francisco Bay Area. Built atop a 20-acre site amidst 15 acres of Chardonnay grape vineyards, the house is oriented to maximize the principal views to the north towards the greater Livermore Valley and Mount Diablo in the distance. The main residence comprises a master bedroom, two children’s bedrooms, a great room, a dining room, a sitting room, a library/media room, a sew- ing room and a 3-car garage. The dining room and great room straddle a large trellised terrace. A sculptural guest house, referred to as the “Folly”, is a 2-story stone-clad structure with a cantilevered guest room overlooking the vineyard. Beneath the Folly is a large outdoor dining area. The residence’s form is a simple rectangle in plan that has been eroded by a combination of courtyards and terraces on both the north and south sides of Livermore House; View from southeast the house. The materials for the house have been selected to harmonize with the site and its surroundings. The roofing material is copper-clad shingles that will quickly patinate to a rich dark brown and ultimately to a green. The simple roof form is defined by a single ridgeline and is only punctuated by a single, massive stone chimney. Mahogany trellises cover the courtyards and terraces. The exterior of the facade facing south features integrally-colored cement stucco with deep-set mahogany windows; the north is predomi- nantly a mahogany and glass window wall system. The principal architectural expression of the residence draws from the home’s structural system of finely crafted millwork. The structure consists of exposed glue-laminated rafters, topped with wooden decking, and glue-laminated beams and columns. All structural millwork will be fabricated from Douglas Fir and be exposed throughout. The interiors are intended to be crisp and modern in design. Interior elements and finishes, while remaining comple- mentary to the larger wooden volume, will exist within and float free of the wooden jewelbox. Livermore House; Plan
  13. 13. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Livermore House; View from northeast
  14. 14. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Folly; Photo of South Facade Folly; Structural Axonometric Sketch
  15. 15. private reSidence, liverMore, ca Livermore House; Interior Photo at Entry
  16. 16. adrienne arSHt center For tHe perForMing artS, MiaMi, Florida Mark was Technical Architect on many critical components of this complex project. The 500,000 sf Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts (formerly the Carnival Center) is the premier performing arts center in South Florida and the second largest in the United States, after Lincoln Center. The Arsht Center con- sists of two main buildings – the Sanford and Delores Ziff Ballet Opera House and the John S. and James L. Knight Concert Hall – separated by the outdoor Plaza of the Arts. The Arsht Center is home to the Miami Ballet and the Florida Grand Opera and host to guest resident orchestras and traveling productions. The Ballet Opera House and the Concert Hall are each composed of a series of stepped masses clad in light-colored Sardinian granite. The forms, a modern interpretation of ancient stone ar- chitecture, project a sense of both permanence and excitement. The buildings are punctuated by large glass and steel curtain walls at their entries, adding to their contemporary, crystalline expression. The Plaza for the Arts, which is bisected by Biscayne Boulevard, contains colonnades, cascading garden terraces, and a paving Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts pattern based on Afro-Caribbean designs. A 1929 tower from a Sears store, the earliest example of Art Deco style in Miami, was preserved and incorporated into the Plaza design. In addition to its 2,480-seat main stage, the Ballet Opera House includes a 200-seat studio theater for smaller productions. In the main house, a dramatic “acoustic dome” hangs over the audience – a 40-foot convex disc covered with sound-reflective bumps that bounce sound throughout the space. In the 2,200-seat Concert Hall, a spiraling acoustic canopy is suspended over the stage. Rings of custom light fixtures accent the flowing form. In conjunction with the Miami-Dade Art in Public Places program, Pelli Clarke Pelli collaborated with five artists to create unique works that were incorporated into the architecture: Jose Bedia, Robert Rahway Zakananitch, Gary Moore, Anna Valentina Murch, and Cundo Bermudez. Site Plan
  17. 17. adrienne arSHt center For tHe perForMing artS, MiaMi, Florida Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Aerial Photo
  18. 18. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Mark was Senior Design Leader for this 320,000 square foot public high school. His responsibilities included primary contact with the Building Committee and all user groups to determine program requirements, room layouts, and classroom utilization calcula- tions. Mark generated the design options from conceptual design through design development, and presented the options as they were developed to the building committee. He coordinated the work of the design team in the office, and worked with the en- gineers to resolve placement of major equipment and primary distribution paths. The project began with program verification and a feasibility study to determine the most effective approach to the design. The work evolved into the full renovation of the existing school - 200,000 sf - and an addition of 120,000 sf. The renovation included a 900 seat auditorium, new entry lobbies, classrooms, and ad- ministration. An existing courtyard was enclosed to create a new double height media center. The addition holds new science labs, Existing Building; Second Floor cafeteria, and a magnet school, the Center for Global Studies. The constrained site, complex existing conditions, and multiple client groups made the success of this project particularly rewarding. Existing Building; Entry Existing Building; First Floor
  19. 19. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Schematic Design Option D; Site and First Floor Plan Schematic Design Option D; Aerial Perspective Schematic Design Option C; Aerial Perspective Schematic Design Option B; Site and First Floor Plan
  20. 20. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  21. 21. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  22. 22. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  23. 23. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct
  24. 24. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Section at Media Center; Design Sketch Section at Media Center; Construction Document
  25. 25. brien McMaHon HigH ScHool; norWalk , ct Plan Study at CGS Community Room Elevation Study at CGS Community Room
  26. 26. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut Senior Design Leader for this 18,000 square foot student center housing offices for a variety of on-campus clubs. The building is an addition to an existing student union, in a prominent location on campus, and includes office space for club organizations and a large assembly space. The massing and materials of the design mediates between the modernist expression of the existing stu- dent union and the traditional Georgian campus architecture. University of New Haven; Lower Level Plan University of New Haven; First Floor Plan
  27. 27. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut elevation - SoutH
  28. 28. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut
  29. 29. Student union addition; univerSity oF neW Haven, connecticut
  30. 30. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Mark acted as Project Manager and Senior Designer for this 620,000 gross square foot academic science and research build- ing. The programming phase was recently completed under his direction. The feasibility study that was part of that phase concluded that the existing structure requires total renovation, including replacement of all MEP systems, reinforcement of the structure, and re-cladding of the facade. A new research wing of approximately 280,000 gross square feet will be added and con- nected to the existing building with an atrium. The gross area of the addition and the renovation combined totals 900,000 square feet, with an estimated budget of five hundred million dollars. The Marshak Tower is the major science and technology center for the City University system and houses offices, support spac- es, lecture halls, seminar and conference rooms, break areas, library, computer center, and the school’s athletic facilities in addition to the key research functions. The proposed building will be a state-of-the-art research facility incorporating some of the latest advances in technology and energy management systems. The project was put on hold late in 2001. City University of New York; Science Building Site Options Marshak Building; Photograph of Existing Facade
  31. 31. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Marshak Building; First Floor Plan
  32. 32. Marshak Building; Typical Science Laboratory Floor - Addition
  33. 33. Marshak Building; Typical Science Laboratory Floor - Addition
  34. 34. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Marshak Building; Typical Science Laboratory Floor - Addition
  35. 35. MarSHak building; city univerSity oF neW york Marshak Building; Section through Existing Building and Addition
  36. 36. Srb2/luck reSearcH building; ucla Mark was the Design Team Leader for this 225,000 square foot research building. He was responsible for all aspects of design during the site analysis, conceptual design, and schematic de- sign phases. Critical to the success of the design was maximizing efficiency, which was done through utilizing linear equipment rooms as circulation spaces. The facility houses generic wet labs, a vivarium, faculty offices, and administration offices. The UCLA Biomedical Sciences Research Building and Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center form a new center for research on the UCLA campus. The combined buildings house the Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, the UCLA AIDS Institute and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research Institute. Together, the two buildings house more than 450 scientists and staff, with 12 to 14 groups of scientists sharing four labs on each floor. The buildings are designed to encourage collaboration between researchers who may not ordinarily work together. Open laborato- ries are shared among departments and an open circular staircase connects the two buildings, allowing access across floors. The four Luck Building; View from Court of the Sciences above-grade floors of each building house laboratories, laboratory support, conference rooms and investigators’ offices. The vivarium and mechanical services are below grade. The buildings occupy a prominent site between the historic north campus, with the Court of Sciences to the west and the Sciences Center to the southwest. They face the Mathias Botani- cal Garden to the south and an important campus entrance from Hilgard Avenue to the east. The design reinforces the connection between the Medical Center to the south and the remainder of the campus to the north. An inviting pedestrian walkway forges a strong east-west link from the Hilgard campus entrance to the Court of Sciences. SRB/Luck Research Building; Site Plan
  37. 37. Srb2/luck reSearcH building; ucla Luck Building; View from Court of the Sciences

×